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10-28-2014 - Agenda PacketPlanning Commission Regular Meeting City of Dublin October 28, 2014 City Council Chambers 7:00 P.M. 100 Civic Plaza 1. CALL TO ORDER & ROLL CALL 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG 3. ADDITIONS OR REVISIONS TO THE AGENDA 4. MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETINGS – August 26, 2014 5. ORAL COMMUNICATION - At this time, members of the public may address the Planning Commission on any non-agendized item(s) of interest to the public. In accordance with State Law, no action or discussion may take place on any item not appearing on the Planning Commission agenda. The Planning Commission may respond briefly to statements made or questions posed, or may request Staff to report back at a future meeting concerning the matter. Any member of the public may contact the Assistant Community Development Director regarding proper procedure to place an item on a future Planning Commission agenda. 6. CONSENT CALENDAR 7. WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS 8. PUBLIC HEARINGS 8.1 PLPA-2014-00051 Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program 8.2 PLPA-2014-00031 Amendments to Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapters 8.08 (Definitions), 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land), 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations), 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations), 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations), and 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) and the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) 8.3 PLPA-2013-00031 Housing Element Update (2015-2023) General Plan Amendment 9. NEW OR UNFINISHED BUSINESS 10. OTHER BUSINESS: Brief INFORMATION ONLY reports from the Planning Commission and/or Staff, including Committee Reports and Reports by the Planning Commission related to meetings attended at City Expense (AB 1234). 11. ADJOURNMENT This AGENDA is posted in accordance with Government Code Section 54954.2(a) and Government Code Section 54957.5 If requested, pursuant to Government Code Section 54953.2, this agenda shall be made available in appropriate alternative formats to persons with a disability, as required by Section 202 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. Section 12132), and the federal rules and regulations adopted in implementation thereof. To make a request for disability-related modification or accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office (925) 833-6650 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting. A complete packet of information containing Staff Reports (Agenda Statements) and exhibits related to each item is available for public review at least 72 hours prior to a Planning Commission Meeting or, in the event that it is delivered to the Commission members less than 72 hours prior to a Planning Commission Meeting, as soon as it is so delivered. The packet is available in the Community Development Department. (OVER FOR PROCEDURE SUMMARY) STAFF REPORT 1 82 PLANNING COMMISSION DATE: October 28, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING: PLPA-2014-00051 Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program (Legislative) Report prepared by Kristi Bascom, Principal Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Planning Commission will review City-initiated amendments to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance to extend the program to temporarily eliminate the parking standards in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Village Parkway District for an additional five (5) years. The existing program has been in effect since January 2013 and will expire in January 2015 unless renewed. The proposed amendments will also establish a parking standard for new commercial construction. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission: 1) Receive Staff presentation; 2) Open the public hearing; 3) Take testimony from the public; 4) Close the public hearing and deliberate; and 5) Adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance approving a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program. Submitted By ke ieWed By Principal Planner Assistant Community Development Director COPIES TO: File ITEM NO.: RL Page 1 of 6 G:IPA120141PLPA-2014-00051 Village Parkway Parking extensionlPC 10.28.141PCSR VPW Parking ZOA 10.28.14.docx DESCRIPTION: The overarching goal of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan (DDSP) is "to create a vibrant, dynamic commercial and mixed-use center that provides a wide array of opportunities for shopping, services, dining, working, living, and entertainment in a pedestrian-friendly and aesthetically pleasing setting that attracts both local and regional residents." I The DDSP established three distinct districts, each including its own set of design standards tailored to the envisioned uses. The Transit-Oriented District embraces the recent opening of the West Dublin BART station and is the district where a vast majority of the new residential development in Downtown Dublin is envisioned to take place. The Retail District includes much of the existing retail core and aims to stimulate infill development and redevelopment of aging buildings and large parking areas. The Village Parkway District embraces the existing successful service and retail uses along a "Main Street" corridor, and this district has the most potential to reutilize and re-tenant existing buildings with more intense uses such as restaurants, service retail, and other local-serving businesses. The Village Parkway District is the subject of the Pilot Parking Program, and a map of the District is provided below: Figure 1: Village Parkway District T1>1 - r • s `A Ar A 4. ti 5 t Since the adoption of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan in February 2011, City Staff have been working to implement the goals and policies of both the Specific Plan and the subsequent recommendations of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel report. One of the recommendations from the ULI report was to incentivize more commercial businesses in the 2 of 6 downtown by having greater flexibility in regulatory standards such as the City's parking requirements. In 2012, Staff brought a recommendation to the Planning Commission and City Council to test a Pilot Parking Program in the Village Parkway District for a period of two years. The recommendation was supported by the Planning Commission and an ordinance implementing the pilot program was approved by the City Council and became effective on January 4, 2013 (Ordinance 19-12). The Pilot Parking Program allows parking supply and demand to be managed by the property owners and tenants, and not regulated by the City. It has become the responsibility of the property owners, property managers, and businesses to lease tenant spaces to the right combination of users to ensure that there is sufficient parking to serve the businesses and their customers. With this Ordinance in effect, the requirement that new or expanding businesses in the Village Parkway District need to provide a certain amount of on- site parking was waived. The goal of the pilot program was to enable a wider variety of businesses to be established in the Village Parkway District without the encumbrance of parking requirements. During the time that this pilot program has been in effect, a brewpub restaurant has signed a lease to open on Village Parkway and several other fitness/personal service uses have been established. The allowed uses in the Village Parkway District have continued to be regulated by the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, but the typical parking requirements have not applied. The term of this pilot program was two years, and the program will expire in January 2015 unless extended by the City Council. Staff's recommendation is to extend the program an additional five years to allow more time to test this market-based approach to parking. ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT Ordinance 19-12 (Attachment 1), approved in 2012, modified Section 8.76.080.D (Parking Requirements by Use Type — Commercial) to add the following language (the modified text is underlined): Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as noted in the table below, with the exception of uses located on properties in the Village Parkway District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Uses in the Village Parkway District are not required to provide a prescribed number of parking spaces for any use that is permitted or conditionally permitted in the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. This modification is effective through January 4, 2015, after which it will revert back to the previous language, which requires all commercial uses in all areas to meet the parking required by their use. The proposed amendment is to extend the effective date of the modified language shown above for an additional five years, which will result in an expiration date of January 4, 2020. In addition to making the above language effective for five additional years, clarifying language will be added to provide a parking standard for new commercial construction in the Village Parkway District. The resulting language for Section 8.76.080.D will be as follows: Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as noted in the table below, with the exception of uses proposing to occupy existing buildings in the Village Parkway District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Uses 3 of 6 occupying existing buildings in the Village Parkway District are not required to provide a prescribed number of parking spaces for any commercial use that is permitted or conditionally permitted in the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. New buildings that are proposed to be constructed in the Village Parkway District are required to provide parking spaces at the rate of 1 space per 300 square feet of gross building area, regardless of the future commercial use of the building. All on-site parking spaces within the Village Parkway District shall be considered "required parking" for the purposes of administering Chapter 8.76 unless otherwise determined by the Community Development Director. OTHER DOWNTOWN PARKING CONSIDERATIONS The City Council held a Study Session on the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan on July 29, 2014. One of the topics covered during the course of the meeting was the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program, and the discussion covered the potential to extend the timeframe of the pilot program and possibly expand its reach to other districts in Downtown Dublin. Staff analyzed the need to adjust the commercial parking requirements in the Retail and Transit-Oriented Districts of the DDSP, and Staff's recommendation at this time is to extend the program in the Village Parkway District only. The Village Parkway District is unique in that due to the size and configuration of the parcels and the layout of the buildings, the area is unlikely to see a large amount of new development. In this District, the focus is primarily on reutilizing existing buildings for new and different uses. Easing the parking requirements is intended to help facilitate this transition. In contrast, development in the Transit-Oriented District will primarily be residential and mixed- use projects that will involve a wholesale reutilization of any site to a more intense use. Commercial parking requirements have, so far, not appeared to be a hindrance for development to occur. In the Retail District, many sites have an excess of parking, although several sites have other constraints including restrictive CC&Rs and/or lease agreements. Although Staff is not proposing any commercial parking standard modifications at this time, over the coming year Staff will reach out to property owners in the Retail District to discuss what parking challenges may exist (including the need for additional on-street parking and the need to consider alternative residential parking standards in the Retail District) and identify potential solutions. The proposed Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance approving a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program is included as Attachment 2 to this Staff Report, with the accompanying City Council Ordinance as Exhibit A to Attachment 2. CONSISTENCY WITH THE GENERAL PLAN, SPECIFIC PLAN AND ZONING ORDINANCE: The proposed amendments to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations) are consistent with the General Plan, Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, and the Zoning Ordinance in that the amendments are limited to relaxing the parking requirements for a temporary period of time for uses which are consistent with the General Plan, Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, and j Zoning Ordinance. The proposed amendments do not change any land use designations or zoning designations. i I i 4 of 6 NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH: City Staff held a Community Meeting on Friday, October 3, 2014 and invited all property owners and tenants in the Village Parkway District. Staff also solicited feedback on the Pilot Program via email. Three property owners provided feedback on the Pilot Program and all comments were in support of continuing the program for an additional period of time. In accordance with State law, a public notice was published in the Valley Times and posted at several locations throughout the City. A notice of this hearing was mailed to those requesting such notice ten days before the hearing and the Staff Report and attachments were made available for public review prior to the public hearing in accordance with Government Code Sections 65090 and 65091. A public notice was also sent to all tenants and property owners in the entire Village Parkway District and all tenants and property owners within 300 feet of the affected properties. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with the State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared. For this project, Staff recommends that the project be found exempt from CEQA in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3) because it can be seen with certainty that the amendments to Chapter 8.76 of the Dublin Municipal Code (Off-Street Parking and Loading) will not have a significant effect on the environment ATTACHMENTS: 1) City Council Ordinance 19-12. 2) Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance approving a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off- Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program, with the City Council Ordinance included as it Exhibit A. 5 of 6 GENERAL INFORMATION: APPLICANT: City of Dublin PROPERTY OWNERS: Various LOCATION: All properties in the Village Parkway District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ASSESSORS PARCEL NUMBERS: Various GENERAL PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan (Village Parkway District) SPECIFIC PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION: n/a SURROUNDING USES: LOCATION ZONING GENERAL PLAN LAND USE CURRENT USE OF PROPERTY North DDZD Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Residential (Village Parkway District South DDZD Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Office, Retail (Village Parkway District East DDZD Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Residential Villa a Parkway District Interstate 680, West n/a n/a Flood Control Channel I i 6 of 6 ORDINANCE NO. 19 — 12 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN AMENDING CHAPTER 8.76 (OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING) RELATED TO THE VILLAGE PARKWAY MARKET-BASED PARKING PROGRAM PLPA-2012-00033 WHEREAS, City Staff have been working to implement the goals and policies of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan and the subsequent recommendations of the Urban Land p g Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel report; and WHEREAS, one of the ULI report recommendations relates to allowing greater intensity of uses in Downtown Dublin; however the Village Parkway District is limited to achieve greater vibra nc y and intensity with the City's current parking standards combined with the existing building and development patterns in place; and WHEREAS, the proposed market-based parking program eliminating minimum parking standards would be implemented for a temporary period of two years and the parking supply w tenants and not regulated b the and demand would be managed b the roe owners and Y a 9 g Y property rtY City; and WHEREAS, Staff presented a report to the City Council on August 21, 2012 seeking their input on the market-based parking program concept and the City Council directed Staff to proceed with preparing an amendment to the Zoning Ordinance to temporarily suspend the parking standards in the Village Parkway District for a limited term of two years; and WHEREAS, a Community Meeting was held on September 21, 2012 soliciting feedback and businesses in the Village Parkway District' and from property owners g Y , p p Y WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hold a properly noticed public hearing on the Zonin g Ordinance Amendments on October 9, 2012 and adopted Resolution 12-37 recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance approving a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Parking Reduction Program; and WHEREAS, a properly noticed public hearing was held by the City Council on November 20, 2012; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 8.120.050,13 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council finds that the Zoning Ordinance Amendments are consistent with the Dublin General Plan and the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and use its independent judgment and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony hereinabove set forth. Page 1 of 3 ATTACHMENT 1 NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Dublin does hereby ordain as follows: SECTION 1. Compliance with California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA"): The City Council declares this Ordinance is exempt from CEQA per CEQA Guidelines Section 15601(b)(3). Section 15601(b)(3) states that CEQA applies only to those projects that have the potential to cause a significant effect on the environment. The adoption of this Ordinance is exempt from CEQA because the Ordinance does not, in itself, allow the construction of any building or structure, but it sets forth the parking regulations that shall be followed if and when a building or structure is occupied by a user. This Ordinance of itself, therefore, has no potential for resulting in significant physical change in the environment, directly or ultimately. SECTION 2. Thirty days following the adoption of this Ordinance, the first paragraph of Section 8.76.080.D (Parking Requirements by Use Type — Commercial) of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: D. Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as noted in the table below, with the exception of uses located on properties in the Village Parkway District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Uses in the Village Parkway District are not required to provide a prescribed number of parking spaces for any use that is permitted or conditionally permitted in the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. All other text in Section 8.76.080.D, and all other text in the remainder of Chapter 8.76, remains unchanged. SECTION 3. Two years following the effective date of this Ordinance, the first paragraph of Section 8.76.080.D (Parking Requirements by Use Type —Commercial) of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: D. Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as follows: remains All other text in Section 8.76.080.D, and all other text in the remainder of Chapter 8.76 unchanged. SECTION 4. Severa ill . The provisions of this Ordinance are severable and if an provision, clause, b p any sentence, word or part thereof is held illegal, invalid, unconstitutional, or inapplicable to any person or circumstances, such illegality, invalidity, unconstitutionality, or inapplicability shall not affect or impair any of the remaining provisions, clauses, sentences, sections, words or parts thereof of the ordinance or their applicability to other persons or circumstances. Page 2of3 SECTION 5. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect and be enforced thirty (30) days following its adoption. SECTION 6. Posting. The City lerk of the City of Dublin shall cause this Ordinance to be posted in at least 9 Y Y p three (3) public places in the City of Dublin in accordance with Section 36933 of the Government Code of the State of California. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED 41h day f December 2012, b the following Y Y 9 vote: AYES: Councilmembers Biddle, Hart, Hildenbrand, Swalwell, and Mayor Sbranti NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None Mayor ATTEST: 1 Z- City Clerk Ord 19-12,Adopted 12-4-12, Item 4.3 Page 3 of 3 RESOLUTION NO. 14 - xx A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 8.76 (OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING) RELATED TO THE VILLAGE PARKWAY PILOT PARKING PROGRAM PLPA-2014-00051 WHEREAS, City Staff have been working to implement the goals and policies of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan (DDSP) and the subsequent recommendations of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel report; and WHEREAS, one of the ULI report recommendations relates to allowing greater intensity of uses in Downtown Dublin; however, the Village Parkway District is limited to achieve greater vibrancy and intensity with the City's current parking standards combined with the existing building and development patterns in place; and WHEREAS, in 2012, the City Council approved Ordinance 19-12, implementing a Pilot Parking Program to eliminate the parking requirements in the Village Parkway District of the DDSP for a temporary period of two (2) years. The Ordinance expires on January 4, 2015 unless extended; and WHEREAS, after conducting outreach with the property owners and tenants in the Village Parkway District, Staff proposes to extend the Pilot Parking Program for an additional five (5) years; and WHEREAS, Staff further proposes to establish a parking standard for new commercial development within the Village Parkway District to clarify the administration of Chapter 8.76 of the Zoning Ordinance as it applies to this district;, and WHEREAS, the proposed amendments to the Zoning Ordinance are set forth in the Ordinance that is attached as Exhibit A to this Resolution; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hold a public hearing on the proposed modifications and considered a related staff report analyzing the proposal on October 28, 2014, for which proper notice was given in accordance with California State Law; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission at its October 28, 2014, meeting did hear and use its independent judgment and considered all said reports, recommendations, and testimony hereinabove set forth; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 8.120.050.6 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the Planning Commission finds that the Zoning Ordinance Amendment is consistent with the Dublin General Plan and all applicable Specific Plans; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission recommends that the project be found exempt ATTACHMENT 2 from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3) because the amendments to Title 8 (Zoning Ordinance) of the Dublin Municipal Code do not have the potential for causing a significant effect on the environment. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend that the City Council adopt the Ordinance attached hereto as Exhibit A. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 28th day of October 2014 by the following votes: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chairperson ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director G:IPAWN0 PLPA-2014-00051 Village Parkway Parking extensionlPC 10.28.140tt xx-Reso.DOC ,I I I � 2 it ORDINANCE NO. XX— 14 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN * * * * * * * * * * * * * * AMENDING CHAPTER 8.76 (OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING) RELATED TO THE VILLAGE PARKWAY PILOT PARKING PROGRAM PLPA-2012-00033 WHEREAS, City Staff have been working to implement the goals and policies of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan and the subsequent recommendations of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Technical Assistance Panel report; and WHEREAS, one of the ULI report recommendations relates to allowing greater intensity of uses in Downtown Dublin, however the Village Parkway District is limited to achieve greater vibrancy and intensity with the City's current parking standards combined with the existing building and development patterns in place; and WHEREAS, in 2012, the City Council approved Ordinance 19-12, implementing a pilot parking program to eliminate the parking requirements in the Village Parkway District of the DDSP for a temporary period of two (2) years. The Ordinance expires on January 4, 2015 unless extended; and WHEREAS, after conducting outreach with the property owners and tenants in the Village Parkway District, Staff proposes to extend the pilot parking program for an additional five (5) years; and WHEREAS, Staff further proposes to establish a parking standard for new commercial development within the Village Parkway District and to clarify the administration of Chapter 8.76 of the Zoning Ordinance as it applies to this district; and WHEREAS, a Community Meeting was held on October 3, 2014 soliciting feedback from property owners and businesses in the Village Parkway District; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hold a properly noticed public hearing on the Zoning Ordinance Amendments on October 28, 2014 and adopted Resolution 14-xx recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance approving a Zoning Ordinance Amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) related to the Village Parkway Pilot Parking Program; and WHEREAS, a staff report dated 2014 was prepared to analyze the j project for the City Council and a properly noticed public hearing was held by the City Council on , 2014; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 8.120.050.6 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council finds that the Zoning Ordinance Amendments are consistent with the Dublin General Plan and the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and use its independent judgment and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony hereinabove set forth. EXHIBIT A TO ATTACHMENT 2 NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Dublin does hereby ordain as follows: SECTION 1. Compliance with California Environmental Quality Act ("CEQA"): The City Council declares this Ordinance is exempt from CEQA per CEQA Guidelines Section 15601(b)(3). Section 15601(b)(3) states that CEQA applies only to those projects that have the potential to cause a significant effect on the environment. The adoption of this Ordinance is exempt from CEQA because the Ordinance does not, in itself, allow the construction of any building or structure, but it sets forth the parking regulations that shall be followed if and when a building or structure is occupied by a user. This Ordinance of itself, therefore, has no potential for resulting in significant physical change in the environment, directly or ultimately. SECTION 2. The first paragraph of Section 8.76.080.D (Parking Requirements by Use Type — Commercial) of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: "D. Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as noted in the table below, with the exception of uses proposing to occupy existing buildings in the Village Parkway District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Uses occupying existing buildings in the Village Parkway District are not required to provide a prescribed number of parking spaces for any commercial use that is permitted or conditionally permitted in the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. New buildings that are proposed to be constructed in the Village Parkway District are required to provide parking spaces at the rate of 1 space per 300 square feet of gross building area, regardless of the future commercial use of the building. All on-site parking spaces within the Village Parkway District shall be considered "required parking" for the purposes of administering Chapter 8.76 unless otherwise determined by the Community Development Director." All other text in Section 8.76.080.D, and all other text in the remainder of Chapter 8.76, remains unchanged. SECTION 3. Five years following the effective date of this Ordinance, the first paragraph of Section 8.76.080.D (Parking Requirements by Use Type — Commercial) of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: "D. Commercial Use Types. Commercial Use Types shall provide off-street parking spaces as follows:" All other text in Section 8.76.080.D, and all other text in the remainder of Chapter 8.76, remains unchanged. SECTION 4. n f this Ordinance are severable and if an Severability. The provisions o any provision, clause,p Page 2 of 3 sentence, word or part thereof is held illegal, invalid, unconstitutional, or inapplicable to any person or circumstances, such illegality, invalidity, unconstitutionality, or inapplicability shall not affect or impair any of the remaining provisions, clauses, sentences, sections, words or parts thereof of the ordinance or their applicability to other persons or circumstances. SECTION 5. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall take effect and be enforced thirty (30) days following its adoption. SECTION 6. Posting. The City Clerk of the City of Dublin shall cause this Ordinance to be posted in at least three (3) public places in the City of Dublin in accordance with Section 36933 of the Government Code of the State of California. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED BY the City Council of the City of Dublin on this day of 2014, by the following votes: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Mayor ATTEST: City Clerk G:\PA\2014\PLPA-2014-00051 Village Parkway Parking extension\PC 10.28.14\Att 2-Exhibit A-CC Ord.doc Page 3 of 3 OF Dp�l f� STAFF REPORT 2 PLANNING COMMISSION O�LIFOR��� DATE: October 28, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING: PLPA-2014-00031 Amendments to Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapters 8.08 (Definitions), 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land), 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations), 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations), 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations), and 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) and the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). Report prepared by Mamie R. Delgado, Senior Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Assembly Bill (AB) 1616 allows individuals to prepare and/or package certain foods in private- home kitchens referred to as "cottage food operations." The enactment of AB 1616 provides cottage food operators with the opportunity to operate a small scale food business from their private home and requires that cities and counties allow them. However, AB 1616 also permits the adoption of local ordinances to impose reasonable standards, restrictions and requirements concerning spacing and concentration, traffic control, parking and noise control. AB 1616 also requires that cottage food operators be registered or permitted by the local environmental health agency before commencing business. Staff is proposing that the Zoning Ordinance be amended to allow cottage food operations to be permitted by-right in residential areas subject to certain standards appropriate for a home based business and consistent with State law. Minor amendments to the existing Home Occupations Regulations are also proposed for clarity and internal consistency. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission: 1) Receive Staff presentation; 2) Open the public hearing; 3) Take testimony from the public; 4) Close the public hearing and deliberate; and 5) Adopt a Resolution recommending City Council approval of amendments to Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapters 8.08 (Definitions), 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land), 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations), 8.64 (Home Occupation Regulations), 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations), and 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) and the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). r, U�Y1ow►-�� Lam. ad-o � � Submitted By sewed By Senior Planner Assistant Community Development Director COPIES TO: File of ITEM NO.: Page 1 of 7 minimize parking and traffic impacts, Staff is proposing to limit the number of customers on-site to one (1) at any given time during the permitted hours of operation for on-site sales. On-site direct sales would not be permitted within the garage, an accessory structure or outside of the dwelling. • Hours of Operation for On-Site Direct Sales. While State law allows for on-site direct sales, it does not establish the hours that a cottage food operation may be open to the public. Staff is proposing that on-site direct sales be permitted between the hours of 7am and 9pm. • On-Site Dining. Under the existing home occupations regulations, a restaurant is a prohibited home occupation. Staff is proposing to also prohibit on-site dining associated with a cottage food operation. • Parking. While State law allows a cottage food operation to employ individuals who do not reside in the home and allows for on-site direct sales, it authorizes but does not specify parking requirements for employees or customers. Staff is proposing that a cottage food operation be required to provide off-street parking for an employee as well as a dedicated company vehicle, if applicable. Customers would be expected to utilize on-street parking or designated guest parking. • Company Vehicle. State law allows cottage food operations to sell their products off-site at farmer's markets and fairs, provide door-to-door deliveries or take their products to a third party retailer. These activities may require the use of a company vehicle. Under the existing home occupations regulations, a home occupation may park one company vehicle up to % ton in capacity at the residence. Staff is proposing a similar regulation for cottage food operations. One, off-street parking space, would need to be provided for a company vehicle; however, a company vehicle would not be permitted to occupy a required parking space for the dwelling unless it also served as the occupant's personal vehicle. • Minimum Separation. State law expressly allows cities and counties to impose reasonable spacing and concentration regulations for cottage food operations but does not set forth the exact parameters. Staff is proposing a minimum 300-foot radius separation between all cottage food operations, excluding multi-family dwellings designated High Density Residential in the General Plan. The 300-foot radius separation is consistent with the required spacing for large family day care homes and would avoid overconcentration of cottage food operations in a neighborhood thereby ensuring that the residential character of the neighborhood is maintained. For multi-family dwellings designated High Density Residential in the General Plan, Staff is proposing that up to 2% of the total number of units in the development be permitted to have cottage food operations. For example, a 300 unit apartment complex with a high density land use designation could have up to six cottage food operations. The 2% allowance for high density residential dwellings provides a reasonable number of cottage food operations per development and gives residents living in a higher density community equal opportunity to establish a cottage food operation than what would otherwise be allowed under the 300-foot radius separation requirement. Exceptions to the 300-foot radius separation or the 2% maximum could be considered through a Minor Use Permit process if it can be demonstrated that the exception is consistent with the intent of the cottage food operations chapter. • Fire Safety/Occupancy. The existing home occupations regulations restrict home occupations from changing the occupancy classification of a residence. Staff is proposing to include this regulation as part of the cottage food operations. 4of7 • Nuisances. The existing home occupations regulations prohibit home occupations from creating or causing nuisances (i.e. traffic, noise, etc.) beyond what is normal for a residential area. Staff is proposing a similar regulation as part of the cottage food operations. • Outdoor Storage/Display. The existing home occupations regulations prohibit the outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment, supplies, etc. Staff is proposing to include this regulation as part of the cottage food operations. • Signs. The existing home occupations regulations prohibit the display of signs advertising or otherwise identifying the home occupation. Staff is proposing to include this regulation as part of the cottage food operations. • Delivery Trips. The existing home occupations regulations limit the number of pedestrian, vehicular and delivery trips associated with a home occupation to no more than five pedestrian or vehicle trips per day and no more than two delivery trips per day. Additionally, deliveries are prohibited between the hours of 9pm and 8am. Staff is proposing a similar regulation that would limit delivery trips to two per day, no restriction on pedestrian or vehicular trips is proposed to be included. • Business License. All home occupations are required to obtain a Dublin Business License which must remain current throughout the duration of the business. Staff is proposing to include this regulation as part of the cottage food operations. • Rented Property. All home occupations require property owner authorization when the business is being operated on rental property. Staff is proposing to include this regulation as part of the cottage food operations. Staff is also proposing associated Zoning Ordinance amendments (Attachment 4, Exhibit A) to implement Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) and ensure internal consistency. Amendments are proposed to Chapters 8.08 (Definitions), 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land), 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations), 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations), 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations), and 8.116 (Zoning Clearance). The following discussion summarizes the proposed amendments to each of these chapters. Chapter 8.08 (Definitions) An amendment to Chapter 8.08 (Definitions) is proposed to add a definition for Cottage Food Operations as a specific use type. The proposed definition would read as follows: Cottage Food Operations (use type). The term Cottage Food Operations shall mean a home-based food business, established within a residential dwelling as an accessory use that is incidental and subordinate to the residential dwelling, where specific food products are prepared for sale to consumers consistent with the California Homemade Food Act and as further defined in Health and Safety Code Section 113758, as may be amended. Chapter 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land) An amendment to Chapter 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land) is proposed to add Cottage Food Operations as a permitted residential use type in the Agricultural and all Residential zoning districts subject to approval of a Zoning Clearance or Minor Use Permit. 5 of 7 Chapter 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations) An amendment to Chapter 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations) is proposed to include cottage food operations which are permitted residential accessory uses. As a clean-up item, Staff is also proposing that Large Family Day Care Homes be added to this section. Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations) An amendment to Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations) is proposed to establish an off-street parking requirement for cottage food operations as a residential use type. The proposed parking requirement would read as follows: RESIDENTIAL USE TYPES NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES REQUIRED Cottage Food Operations Provide the number of spaces required for the type of residential dwelling plus 1 space for an employee not residing in the home (if applicable) plus 1 space for a company vehicle (if applicable). A company vehicle that also serves as the day-to-day personal vehicle of the individual conducting the cottage food operation shall not require an additional parking space. Chapter 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) An amendment to Chapter 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) is proposed to add cottage food operations as a use requiring a Zoning Clearance permit. Amendments to this chapter are implementing measures of the proposed Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations) Staff is proposing that Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations) be amended to clarify that a cottage food operation, while considered a home-based business, would not be subject to the requirements of Chapter 8.64 but instead would be regulated by the proposed Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). As a clean-up item, Staff is also proposing to clarify that Large Family Day Care Homes be excluded from the Home Occupations Regulations chapter. Large Family Day Care Homes are regulated by Chapter 8.66 (Large Family Day Care Homes). Additionally, Staff has taken this opportunity to review the Home Occupation Regulations in its entirety and is proposing other amendments to clarify the existing regulations. Some of these clarifications are a result of implementing and enforcing the Home Occupations Regulations and others are in response to refinements resulting from the cottage food operations. For a redlined version of the proposed amendments, refer to Attachment 5. CONSISTENCY WITH THE GENERAL PLAN, SPECIFIC PLAN AND ZONING ORDINANCE: The proposed Zoning Ordinance Amendments, as outlined in this Staff Report and the draft City Council Ordinance included as Attachment 4, Exhibit A, are consistent with the Dublin General Plan and all applicable Specific Plans in that the Amendments relating to home occupations such as cottage food operations are consistent with applicable land use designations and general development policies. The other amendments propose procedural, clean-up and minor revisions and raise no inconsistencies with the General Plan or any specific plans. The amendments include minor revisions for internal consistency within the Zoning Ordinance. 6 of 7 NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH: A Public Notice was published in the Valley Times and posted at several locations throughout the City. The Public Notice was provided to all persons who have expressed an interest in being notified of meetings. The Staff Report for this public hearing was also made available on the City's website. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared. Pursuant to the CEQA, Staff is recommending that the project be found exempt in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3) because it can be seen with certainty that the amendments to Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code (Zoning Ordinance) will not have a significant effect on the environment. The adoption of the proposed Ordinance does not, in itself, allow the establishment of any use or the construction of any building or structure, but sets forth the regulations that shall be followed if and when a use is proposed to be established, or a building or structure is proposed to be constructed, or a site is proposed to be developed. This Ordinance of itself, therefore, has no potential for resulting in significant physical change in the environment, directly or ultimately. ATTACHMENTS: 1) California Department of Public Health Approved Cottage Foods (as of May 7, 2014). 2) Proposed Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). 3) Existing Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations). 4) Resolution recommending City Council approval of amendments to Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapters 8.08 (Definitions), 8.12 (Zoning Districts and Permitted Uses of Land), 8.40 (Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations), 8.64 (Home Occupation Regulations), 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations), and 8.116 (Zoning Clearance) and the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) with the draft City Council Ordinance attached as Exhibit A. 5) Redlined version of proposed amendments to Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations). 7of7 s�( Dill I Health Approved Cottage Foods Cottage food operations are allowed to produce certain non-potentially hazardous foods. These are foods that do not support the rapid growth of bacteria that would make people sick when held outside of refrigeration temperatures. The list of approved cottage food categories and their ethnic variations,which cottage food operations are allowed to produce, are listed below. The list will be maintained and updated by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) on its Internet website as necessary. CDPH may add to or delete food products from the approved products list. Notice of any change, reason for the change,the authority for the change, and the nature of the change to the approved food products list will be posted on the CDPH website and shall be become effective thirty (30)days after the notice is posted. Approved Food Products List (July 30,2014): (1) Baked goods,without cream, custard, or meat fillings, such as breads, biscuits, churros, cookies, pastries, and tortillas. (2) Candy, such as brittle and toffee. (3) Chocolate-covered nonperishable foods, such as nuts and dried fruits. (4) Dried fruit. (5) Dried pasta. (6) Dry baking mixes. (7) Fruit pies,fruit empanadas, and fruit tamales. (8) Granola, cereals, and trail mixes. (9) Herb blends and dried mole paste. (10) Honey and sweet sorghum syrup. (11)Jams,jellies, preserves, and fruit butter that comply with the standard described in Part 150 of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. *see below (12) Nut mixes and nut butters. (13) Popcorn., (14)Vinegar and mustard. (15) Roasted coffee and dried tea. (16) Waffle cones and pizelles. (17) Cotton candy. (18) Candied apples. (19) Confections such as salted caramel,fudge, marshmallow bars, chocolate covered marshmallow, nuts, and hard candy, or any combination thereof. (20) Buttercream frosting, buttercream icing, buttercream fondant, and gum paste that do not contain eggs, cream, or cream cheese. (21) Dried or Dehydrated vegetables. (22) Dried vegetarian-based soup mixes. (23)Vegetable and potato chips. (24) Ground chocolate. (25) Seasoning salt. ATTACHMENT 1 + 'Dill I Health *Jams,iellies, preserves,and fruit butter: Cottage food operations which produce jams,jellies,preserves,and other related products must be sure that their products meet the legal established standards of identity requirements for those products as set forth in 21 CFR Part 150. The purpose of the regulation is to maintain the integrity of the food product to ensure consumers consistently get what they expect. The product name and ingredients listed on the label must be factual and comply with the legal definitions and standards of identity or the product may be considered misbranded. Products made with other ingredients that are not defined in 21 CFR 150 cannot be produced by cottage food operations. Addition of other ingredients or alteration of ingredient profiles changes the chemistry of the food, which can allow the growth of various bacteria and toxins under the right conditions. For example, addition of peppers (i.e. jalapeno pepper) to make pepper jelly is not supported by 21 CFR 150 and the addition of this low acid ingredient could cause the formation of botulism toxin in the product if the proper controls are not used. COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS Chapter 8.65 CHAPTER 8.65 COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS 8.65.010 Purpose. The purpose of this Chapter is to provide for the establishment of Cottage Food Operations, where specific food products that do not require refrigeration are made or repackaged for sale to consumers, as an incidental and subordinate use within a lawfully established residential dwelling. 8.65.020 Intent. The intent of this Chapter is to: A. Establish a ministerial process for the review and approval of Cottage Food Operations. B. Establish development standards and regulations for Cottage Food Operations within the City. C. Ensure that Cottage Food Operations are compatible with surrounding residential uses and do not change the character of the surrounding residential area by generating more traffic,noise or visual impacts than would normally be expected in a residential zoning district. 8.65.030 Permitting Procedure. Any proposed Cottage Food Operation shall conform to the Development Standards and Regulations contained in this Chapter(Section 8.65.040)and shall be subject to a Zoning Clearance to be reviewed by the Community Development Director and processed in accordance with Chapter 8.116 (Zoning Clearance). 8.65.040 Development Standards and Regulations. An application for a Zoning Clearance to establish a Cottage Food Operation shall demonstrate compliance with the following development standards and regulations: A. Permitted within a Residential Dwelling. A Cottage Food Operation may be established within a residential dwelling as an accessory use that is incidental and subordinate to the residential dwelling. All activities associated with the Cottage Food Operation shall be conducted entirely within the dwelling. B. Appearance of the Residence.The Cottage Food Operation may not alter the exterior appearance of the residence so long as the alterations do not change the residential character of the home. C. Codes/Laws/Regulations. The Cottage Food Operation shall conform to all applicable codes, laws and regulations of the City,County, State and Federal governments. D. Employees. The Cottage Food Operation may have one full-time equivalent employee, excluding individuals who reside in the home. A maximum of one employee, full-time or part-time, excluding individuals who reside in the home, may be employed on-site at the residence of the Cottage Food Operation at any given time. E. On-Site Direct Sales to Customers. A Cottage Food Operation may conduct on-site direct sales to customers from within the dwelling. A maximum of one (1) customer may be on-site at any given City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 65-1 October 2014 ATTACHMENT 2 COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS Chapter 8.65 time during the permitted hours of operation for on-site direct sales (refer to Section 8.65.040.F below). Direct sales shall not take place within an attached garage, detached accessory structure or outside of the dwelling. F. Hours of Operation for On-Site Direct Sales.A Cottage Food Operation may only conduct on-site direct sales between the hours of 7:00am and 9:00pm. G. On-Site Dining.No on-site dining shall be permitted in conjunction with a Cottage Food Operation. H. Parldng. The Cottage Food Operation shall provide the amount of off-street parking required in Section 8.76.080 (Parking Requirements by Use Type) of the Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations. I. Company Vehicle. One company vehicle (a truck, van or automobile only) no larger than 3/4 ton in capacity, unless otherwise approved by the Community Development Director, and used in conjunction with the Cottage Food Operation, may be parked at the residence. A company vehicle shall not occupy a required parking space for the dwelling unless it also serves as the occupant's personal vehicle. J. Minimum Separation. Except as otherwise stated below, a minimum 300-foot radius separation is required between all Cottage Food Operations. For single family detached dwellings, second units and duplexes, the separation shall be measured from the property lines. For townhomes, apartments and condominiums, where the units are dispersed among multiple buildings, the separation shall be measured from the exterior walls of the building in which the Cottage Food Operation is proposed to be located. For apartments and condominiums with a High Density Residential General Plan Land Use Designation,the total number of Cottage Food Operations shall not exceed 2%of the total number of units within the development. No minimum separation shall be required. A fraction of.5 or greater shall be rounded up to the nearest whole number. Exceptions to the required minimum 300-foot radius separation or the 2%maximum may be granted pursuant to a Minor Use Permit if it can be demonstrated that the exception will not be contrary to Section 8.65.020.0 of this Chapter. K. Fire Safety/Occupancy. Activities conducted and equipment or material used as part of a Cottage Food Operation shall be restricted to residential occupancy classifications as set forth in the Building Code. The Cottage Food Operation shall not reduce the fire safety classification of a residence, or employ the storage of flammable, explosive, or hazardous materials unless specifically approved by the Alameda County Fire Department. L. Nuisances. No Cottage Food Operation shall create or cause traffic, noise, or other nuisances beyond those normal for a residential area or which may be perceptible at or beyond the lot line as determined by the Director of Community Development. M. Outdoor Storage/Display. There shall be no outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment,appliances,tools, materials, or supplies associated with the Cottage Food Operation. N. Signs.There shall be no advertising sign,window display,or other identification of the Cottage Food Operation on the premises other than a house number and nameplate as permitted by Section 8.84.140.D(House Numbers and Name Plates). City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 65-2 October 2014 COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS Chapter 8.65 O. Delivery Trips.No Cottage Food Operation shall generate more than two delivery trips per day.No deliveries shall be made between the hours of 9:00pm and 8:00am. P. Business License. A Business License is required and shall be obtained prior to establishing a Cottage Food Operation. The Business License shall remain current and valid throughout the life of the Cottage Food Operation. Q. Rented Property. If the Cottage Food Operation is to be conducted on rental property, written authorization from the property owner or property manager shall be obtained and submitted to the City when applying for a Business License. 8.65.050 Violation. Any violation of the regulations of this Chapter is subject to enforcement pursuant to Chapter 8.144 (Enforcement) and Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code. Any violation is cause for revocation of the Zoning Clearance pursuant to Chapter 8.96(Permit Procedures)of this Code. City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 65-3 October 2014 Chapter 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS http://wwwcodepublishing.com/ca/Dublin/DublinO8/DublinO864.h... Chapter 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS 8.64.010 Purpose. ''I'll"..,.... ......... ......... The purpose of this Section is to allow Home Occupations for the gainful employment of the occupant of a dwelling in a limited commercial activity,with such employment activity being incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. Intent.The intent of this Section is to ensure that Home Occupations are compatible with, and do not change the character of the surrounding residential area by generating more traffic, noise, odors,visual impacts, or storage of materials than would normally be expected in a residential zoning district. 8.64.020 Business License Required. Business licenses are required for Home Occupations which are permitted as accessory uses in all residential zoning districts. No Home Occupation may be conducted until a Business License is issued. 8.64.030 Limitations on Use. ......... A Home Occupation shall conform to the following limitations on use: A. Accessory Structure/Temporary Structure. No Home Occupation, except for detached offices, studios, or workshops used to cant'on administrative or artistic activities of a commercial nature, may be conducted within an Accessory Structure or a temporary structure. Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) B. Appearance of the Residence.The Home Occupation shall not alter the external appearance of the residence. C. Construction EquipmentlWork Vehicles. No construction equipment or work vehicles such as plumbing vans,electronic repair vans,or similar equipment or work vehicles(except a Company Vehicle permitted by Section 8.64.030.E below), as determined by the Director of Community Development, shall be stored which is used by the occupant of the residence or his/her employees in connection with a Home Occupation. Rev. Ord. 20-06(November 2006) D. Codes/Laws/Regulations.A Home Occupation shall conform to all applicable codes, laws and regulations. E. Company Vehicle. One company vehicle(a truck, van, or automobile only) no larger than 3/4 ton in capacity(whether or not marked with a company name or logo) may be parked in a residential zoning district and used by the occupant directly or indirectly in connection with a Home Occupation. Rev. Ord. 16-02 (October 2002) F. Emergency Shelters and Transitional Housing. No Home Occupations of any nature shall be permitted to operate in an established Emergency Shelter or Transitional Housing unit. Rev. Ord. 25-04(October 2004) G. Employees. No Home Occupation shall employ individuals who do not live in the residence. H. Equipment/Appliances/Storage of Materials of Non-Residential Nature.There shall be no installation of equipment or appliances or storage of materials, of a non-residential nature in a residence or Accessory Structure, as determined by the Director of Community Development. ATTACHMENT 3 1 of 3 10/18/2014 10:33 AM Chapter 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS http://wwwcodepublishing.com/ca/Dublin/DublinO8/DublinO864.h... I. Fire Safety/Occupancy.Activities conducted, and equipment or material used, as part of a Home Occupation shall be restricted to residential occupancy classifications as set forth in the Building Code. The Home Occupation shall not reduce the fire safety classification of a residence or an accessory structure, or employ the storage of flammable, explosive, or hazardous materials unless specifically approved by the Alameda County Fire Department. Rev. Ord. 1-04(January 2004) J. Incidental and Subordinate Use.A Home Occupation shall be incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. K. Indoors/Limited to one room.The Home Occupation shall be conducted indoors and shall be limited completely to one room located within the residence, an accessory structure, or the garage. Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) L. Merchandise For Sale Or Rent From the Premises. No merchandise or goods shall be sold, leased or rented from the premises if the sale, lease or rental requires the customer to visit the premises for delivery. M. Nuisances. No Home Occupation shall create or cause traffic, noise, dust, light,vibration, odor, gas, fumes,toxicthazardous materials, smoke, glare, electrical interference, or other hazards or nuisances beyond those normal for a residential area or which may be perceptible at or beyond the lot line as determined by the Director of Community Development. N. Outdoor Storage/Display.There shall be no outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment, appliances,tools, materials,or supplies associated with a Home Occupation. O. Parking. No vehicle used for a Home Occupation shall occupy a required parking space of a residence. No Home Occupation shall occupy a required parking space of a residence. One off-street parking space (other than in the driveway)shall be provided for a vehicle used for the Home Occupation. P. Rented Property. If the Home Occupation is to be conducted on rental property,the property owner's written authorization for the proposed use shall be obtained and submitted to the City prior to the application for a Business License. Rev. Ord. 1-04(January 2004) Q. Signs.There shall be no advertising sign,window display, or other identification of the Home Occupation on the premises other than a house number and nameplate as permitted by Section 8.84.140.D House Numbers and Name Plates. R. Storage.The storage of equipment, materials,wastes, and other items needed for, or produced by, the construction, landscaping, or service trades is prohibited. S. Students. No more than two students may be given instruction in music,academics, dance, swimming, or other subjects as determined by the Community Development Director in a residence at one time. No students may be given instruction between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. T. Vehicular Trips/Delivery Trips. No Home Occupation shall generate more than five additional pedestrian or vehicular trips in excess of that customarily associated with the zoning district in which it is located, or more than two delivery trips per day. No deliveries shall be made between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. Rev. Ord. 9-03(July 2003) 8.64.040 Prohibited Home Occupations. The following Home Occupations(and any additional Home Occupations, as determined by the Director of 2 of 3 10/18/2014 10:33 AM Chapter 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS http://wwwcodepublishing.com/ca/Dublin/Dublin08/DublinO864.h... Community Development),are in violation of the Purpose and Intent and/or the Limitations on Use of this Section, and are prohibited: A. Adult Businesses Establishments. B. Barber Shop or Beauty Shop. C. Carpentry or cabinet making. D. Dance or night club. E. Fortune telling. F. Grooming, breeding,training or raising of dogs,cats,or other animals. G. Medical and dental offices,clinics,and laboratories. H. Mini-storage. 1. Repair(body or mechanical)or reupholstering of vehicle not owned by the resident. (Note: painting of motorized vehicles or the repair and maintenance of any tractor trucks or semi-trucks is prohibited in any residential zoning district by Section 8.40.030.E.8,Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations. J. Repair Shops(of appliances,electronic equipment,furniture,and similar items as determined by the Director of Community Development), Fix-it shops,or plumbing shops. K. Restaurant. L. Welding and machining. 8.64.050 Violation. Any violation of the regulations of this chapter is cause for revocation of the Business License issued pursuant to Section 8.96.020 of this Code. Rev. Ord. 1-04(January 2004) The Dublin Municipal Code is current through Ordinance 16-14,passed September 2,2014. Disclaimer:The City Clerk's Office has the official version of the Dublin Municipal Code. Users should contact the City Clerk's Office for ordinances passed subsequent to the ordinance cited above. 3 of 3 10/18/2014 10:33 AM ORDINANCE NO. xx— 14 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN * * * * * * * * * * * * * * APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO DUBLIN ZONING ORDINANCE CHAPTERS 8.08 (DEFINITIONS), 8.12 (ZONING DISTRICTS AND PERMITTED USES OF LAND), 8.40 (ACCESSORY STRUCTURES AND USES REGULATIONS), 8.64 (HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS), 8.76 (OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS), AND 8.116 (ZONING CLEARANCE) AND THE CREATION OF CHAPTER 8.65 (COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS) EFFECTIVE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2014-00031 WHEREAS, Assembly Bill (AB) 1616 became effective on January 1, 2013 and allows individuals to prepare and/or package certain non-potentially hazardous foods in private-home kitchens referred to as "cottage food operations"; and WHEREAS, AB 1616 further requires cities and counties to allow cottage food operations in private residences but permits local ordinances that impose reasonable standards, restrictions and requirements concerning spacing and concentration, traffic control, parking and noise control; and WHEREAS, Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations) permits home occupations for the gainful employment of the occupant of a residential dwelling in a limited commercial activity subject to certain standards and regulations; and WHEREAS, the establishment of a cottage food operation in a residential dwelling would not be consistent with the current standards and regulations for home occupations and therefore the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) is proposed; and WHEREAS, Staff is also proposing associated Zoning Ordinance Amendments to: 1) define cottage food operations; 2) establish cottage food operations as a permitted use in agricultural and residential zoning districts; 3) establish cottage food operations as a permitted residential accessory use; 4) exclude cottage food operations from the home occupations regulations chapter; 5) establish a parking requirement for cottage food operations; and 6) require a zoning clearance permit for cottage food operations; and WHEREAS, Staff is also proposing amendments to the Home Occupations Regulations Chapter to clarify certain standards and regulations based on enforcement activity and the changing nature of home occupations in general; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a public hearing on October 28, 2014 and adopted Resolution 14-XX recommending City Council adoption of the proposed Zoning Ordinance Amendments; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted to the City of Dublin City Council recommending approval of the proposed Zoning Ordinance Amendments; and WHEREAS, the City Council held a public hearing on the project on , 2014, at which time all interested parties had the opportunity to be heard; and EXHIBIT A TO ATTACHMENT 4 WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the project. NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Dublin does ordain as follows: SECTION 1: Pursuant to Section 8.120.050.6 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council hereby finds that the Zoning Ordinance Amendments are consistent with the Dublin General Plan and all applicable Specific Plans in that the Amendments relating to uses such as cottage food operations are consistent with applicable land use designations and general development policies. The other amendments propose procedural, clean-up and minor revisions and raise no inconsistencies with the General Plan or any specific plans. SECTION 2: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared. Pursuant to the CEQA, the City Council hereby finds the project exempt in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3) because it can be seen with certainty that the amendments to Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code (Zoning Ordinance) will not have a significant effect on the environment. The adoption of the proposed Ordinance does not, in itself, allow the establishment of any use or the construction of any building or structure, but sets forth the regulations that shall be followed if and when a use is proposed to be established, or a building or structure is proposed to be constructed, or a site is proposed to be developed. This Ordinance of itself, therefore, has no potential for resulting in significant physical change in the environment, directly or ultimately. SECTION 3: Section 8.08.020 (Definitions (A-Z)) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following definition: "Cottage Food Operations (use type). The term Cottage Food Operations shall mean a home-based food business, established within a residential dwelling as an accessory use that is incidental and subordinate to the residential dwelling, where specific food products are prepared for sale to consumers consistent with the California Homemade Food Act and as further defined in Health and Safety Code Section 113758, as may be amended." SECTION 4: Section 8.12.050 (Permitted and Conditionally Permitted Land Uses) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add Cottage Food Operation as a Residential Use Type to read as follows: 2of10 RESIDENTIAL A R-1 R-2 R-M C-O C-N C-1 C-2 M-P M-1 M-2 USE TYPE Cottage Food ZC/ ZC/ ZC/ ZC/ - - - - - -Operations MUP MUP MUP MUP SECTION 5: Section 8.40.030.E.5 (Home Occupations) is hereby amended to read as follows: "Home Occupations, Cottage Food Operations, Large Family Day Care Homes. Home Occupations are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations), Cottage Food Operations are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) and Large Family Day Care Homes are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.66 (Large Family Day Care Homes)." SECTION 6: Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: "CHAPTER 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS 8.64.010 Purpose and Intent. The purpose of this Chapter is to allow Home Occupations for the gainful employment of the occupant of a dwelling in a limited commercial activity, with such employment activity being incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. The intent of this Chapter is to ensure that Home Occupations are compatible with, and do not change the character of the surrounding residential area by generating more traffic, noise, odors, visual impacts, or storage of materials than would normally be expected in a residential zoning district. 8.64.020 Business License Required. Business licenses are required for Home Occupations which are permitted as accessory uses in all residential zoning districts. No Home Occupation may be conducted until a Business License is issued pursuant to Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code. 8.64.030 Limitations on Use. A Home Occupation shall conform to the following limitations on use: A. Accessory Structure/Temporary Structure. No Home Occupation may be conducted within an Accessory Structure or a temporary structure, except for detached offices, studios, or workshops used to carry on administrative or artistic activities of a commercial nature. B. Appearance of the Residence. The Home Occupation shall not alter the external appearance of the residence. C. Construction Equipment/Work Vehicles. No construction equipment or work vehicles such as plumbing vans, electronic repair vans, or similar equipment or work vehicles (except a 3of10 Company Vehicle permitted by Section 8.64.030.E below), as determined by the Director of Community Development, shall be stored which is used by the occupant of the residence or his/her employees in connection with a Home Occupation. D. Codes/Laws/Regulations. A Home Occupation shall conform to all applicable codes, laws and regulations of the City, County, State and Federal governments. E. Company Vehicle. One company vehicle (a truck, van, or automobile only) no larger than 3/4 ton in capacity, unless otherwise approved by the Community Development Director, may be parked in a residential zoning district and used by the occupant directly or indirectly in connection with a Home Occupation. The company vehicle may have a company name and/or logo adhered to it. The company name and/or logo shall not exceed 9 square feet per side of the vehicle and shall not be used as a sign platform for the sole purpose of advertising, or attracting people to, the Home Occupation. F. Emergency Shelters and Transitional Housing. No Home Occupations of any nature shall be permitted to operate in an established Emergency Shelter or Transitional Housing unit. G. Employees. No Home Occupation shall permit employees who do not reside in the home to gather at, or work from, the home. H. Equipment/Appliances/Storage of Materials of Non-Residential Nature. There shall be no installation of equipment or appliances or storage of materials, of a non-residential nature in a residence or Accessory Structure, as determined by the Director of Community Development. I. Fire Safety/Occupancy. Activities conducted, and equipment or material used, as part of a Home Occupation shall be restricted to residential occupancy classifications as set forth in the Building Code. The Home Occupation shall not reduce the fire safety classification of a residence or an accessory structure, or employ the storage of flammable, explosive, or hazardous materials unless specifically approved by the Alameda County Fire Department. J. Incidental and Subordinate Use. A Home Occupation shall be incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. K. Indoors/Limited to one room. The Home Occupation, with the exception of swimming instruction, shall be conducted entirely indoors. The Home Occupation shall be limited completely to one room located within the residence, an accessory structure, or the garage so long as the Home Occupation does not occupy a required parking space of the residence. L. Merchandise For Sale, Lease Or Rent, or Services Provided. No merchandise or goods shall be sold, leased or rented from the premises if the sale, lease or rental requires the customer to visit the premises for delivery. No services shall be provided from the premises if the service requires the customer to visit the premises for the service provided (except Students permitted by Section 8.64.030.S). M. Nuisances. No Home Occupation shall create or cause traffic, noise, dust, light, vibration, odor, gas, fumes, toxic/hazardous materials, smoke, glare, electrical interference, or other hazards or nuisances beyond those normal for a residential area or which may be perceptible at or beyond the lot line as determined by the Director of Community Development. 4of10 N. Outdoor Storage/Display. There shall be no outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment, appliances, tools, materials, or supplies associated with a Home Occupation. O. Parking. No vehicle used for a Home Occupation shall occupy a required parking space of a residence unless the vehicle also serves as the day-to-day personal vehicle of the individual conducting the Home Occupation. One off-street parking space shall be provided for a vehicle used exclusively for the Home Occupation. P. Rented Property. If the Home Occupation is to be conducted on rental property, written authorization to conduct the home occupation on the premises shall be obtained from the property owner or property manager and submitted to the City when applying for a Business License. Q. Signs. There shall be no advertising sign, window display, or other identification of the Home Occupation on the premises other than a house number and nameplate as permitted by Section 8.84.140.D House Numbers and Name Plates. R. Storage. The storage of equipment, materials, wastes, and other items needed for, or produced by, the construction, landscaping, or service trades is prohibited. S. Students. No more than two students may be given instruction in music, academics, dance, swimming, or other subjects as determined by the Community Development Director in a residence at one time. No students may be given instruction between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. T. Vehicular Trips/Delivery Trips. No Home Occupation shall generate more than five additional pedestrian or vehicular trips per day. No Home Occupation shall generate more than two delivery trips per day and no deliveries shall be made between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. 8.64.040 Prohibited Home Occupations. The following Home Occupations are in violation of the Purpose and Intent and/or the Limitations on Use section, and are prohibited: A. Adult Businesses Establishments. B. Personal Services (excluding tutoring). C. Carpentry or cabinet making. D. Dance or night club. E. Fortune telling. F. Grooming, breeding, boarding (day or night), training or raising of dogs, cats, or other animals. G. Medical and dental offices, clinics, and laboratories. 5 of 10 H. Mini-storage. I. Repair (body or mechanical) or reupholstering of vehicle not owned by the resident. (Note: painting of motorized vehicles or the repair and maintenance of any tractor trucks or semi-trucks is prohibited in any residential zoning district by Section 8.40.030.E.8, Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations. J. Repair Shops (of appliances, electronic equipment, furniture, and similar items as determined by the Director of Community Development), Fix-it shops, or plumbing shops. K. Eating and Drinking Establishments. L. Welding and machining. M. Other. Any other Home Occupations, as determined by the Director of Community Development, as being in violation of the Purpose and Intent of this Chapter or the Limitations of Use section. 8.64.050 Exclusions. The following uses are excluded from regulation under this Chapter. A. Cottage Food Operations. Cottage Food Operations are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). B. Large Family Day Care Homes. Large Family Day Care Homes are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.66 (Large Family Day Care Homes). 8.64.060 Violation. Any violation of the regulations of this chapter is subject to enforcement pursuant to Chapter 8.144 (Enforcement) and Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code." SECTION 7: Section 8.76.080.13 (Residential Use Types) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add Cottage Food Operations as follows: "RESIDENTIAL USE TYPES NUMBER OF PARKING SPACES REQUIRED Cottage Food Operations Provide the number of spaces required for the type of residential dwelling plus 1 space for an employee not residing in the home (if applicable) plus 1 space for a company vehicle (if applicable). A company vehicle that also serves as the day-to-day personal vehicle of the individual conducting the cottage food operation shall not require an additional parking space." 6of10 SECTION 8: Section 8.116.020 (Applications Requiring a Zoning Clearance) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following subsection: "J. Cottage Food Operations. Cottage Food Operations that meet the standards specified in Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations)." SECTION 9: Section 8.116.030 (Application) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following subsection: "J. Cottage Food Operations. If the Zoning Clearance is for a Cottage Food Operation, the Applicant shall submit a "Zoning Clearance for Cottage Food Operations" application form provided by the Community Development Department with such information requested on said form." SECTION 10: Section 8.116.040 (Approval) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following subsection: "J. Cottage Food Operations. All Cottage Food Operations shall be reviewed for compliance with Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). The Zoning Clearance approval for a Cottage Food Operation shall be a completed "Zoning Clearance for Cottage Food Operations" application form and any pertinent attachments as required on the form with the date and signature of the Community Development Director or his/her designee." SECTION 11: Section 8.116.050 (Expiration) of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following subsection: "J. Cottage Food Operations. A Zoning Clearance issued in conjunction with a Cottage Food Operation shall expire when the use is no longer operational." SECTION 12: Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code is hereby amended to add the following Chapter: "Chapter 8.65 Cottage Food Operations 8.65.010 Purpose. The purpose of this Chapter is to provide for the establishment of Cottage Food Operations, where specific food products that do not require refrigeration are made or repackaged for sale to consumers, as an incidental and subordinate use within a lawfully established residential dwelling. 8.65.020 Intent. 7of10 The intent of this Chapter is to: A. Establish a ministerial process for the review and approval of Cottage Food Operations. B. Establish development standards and regulations for Cottage Food Operations within the City. C. Ensure that Cottage Food Operations are compatible with surrounding residential uses and do not change the character of the surrounding residential area by generating more traffic, noise or visual impacts than would normally be expected in a residential zoning district. 8.65.030 Permitting Procedure. Any proposed Cottage Food Operation shall conform to the Development Standards and Regulations contained in this Chapter (Section 8.65.040) and shall be subject to a Zoning Clearance to be reviewed by the Community Development Director and processed in accordance with Chapter 8.116 (Zoning Clearance). 8.65.040 Development Standards and Regulations. An application for a Zoning Clearance to establish a Cottage Food Operation shall demonstrate compliance with the following development standards and regulations: A. Permitted within a Residential Dwelling. A Cottage Food Operation may be established within a residential dwelling as an accessory use that is incidental and subordinate to the residential dwelling. All activities associated with the Cottage Food Operation shall be conducted entirely within the dwelling. B. Appearance of the Residence. The Cottage Food Operation may not alter the exterior appearance of the residence so long as the alterations do not change the residential character of the home. C. Codes/Laws/Regulations. The Cottage Food Operation shall conform to all applicable codes, laws and regulations of the City, County, State and Federal governments. D. Employees. The Cottage Food Operation may have one full-time equivalent employee, excluding individuals who reside in the home. A maximum of one employee, full-time or part- time, excluding individuals who reside in the home, may be employed on-site at the residence of the Cottage Food Operation at any given time. E. On-Site Direct Sales to Customers. A Cottage Food Operation may conduct on-site direct sales to customers from within the dwelling. A maximum of one (1) customer may be on- site at any given time during the permitted hours of operation for on-site direct sales (refer to Section 8.65.040.F below). Direct sales shall not take place within an attached garage, detached accessory structure or outside of the dwelling. F. Hours of Operation for On-Site Direct Sales. A Cottage Food Operation may only conduct on-site direct sales between the hours of 7:00am and 9:00pm. 8of10 G. On-Site Dining. No on-site dining shall be permitted in conjunction with a Cottage Food Operation. H. Parking. The Cottage Food Operation shall provide the amount of off-street parking required in Section 8.76.080 (Parking Requirements by Use Type) of the Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations. I. Company Vehicle. One company vehicle (a truck, van or automobile only) no larger than % ton in capacity, unless otherwise approved by the Community Development Director, and used in conjunction with the Cottage Food Operation, may be parked at the residence. A company vehicle shall not occupy a required parking space for the dwelling unless it also serves as the occupant's personal vehicle. J. Minimum Separation. Except as otherwise stated below, a minimum 300-foot radius separation is required between all Cottage Food Operations. For single family detached dwellings, second units and duplexes, the separation shall be measured from the property lines. For townhomes, apartments and condominiums, where the units are dispersed among multiple buildings, the separation shall be measured from the exterior walls of the building in which the Cottage Food Operation is proposed to be located. For apartments and condominiums with a High Density Residential General Plan Land Use Designation, the total number of Cottage Food Operations shall not exceed 2% of the total number of units within the development. No minimum separation shall be required. A fraction of .5 or greater shall be rounded up to the nearest whole number. Exceptions to the required minimum 300-foot radius separation or the 2% maximum may be granted pursuant to a Minor Use Permit if it can be demonstrated that the exception will not be contrary to Section 8.65.020.0 of this Chapter. K. Fire Safety/Occupancy. Activities conducted and equipment or material used as part of a Cottage Food Operation shall be restricted to residential occupancy classifications as set forth in the Building Code. The Cottage Food Operation shall not reduce the fire safety classification of a residence, or employ the storage of flammable, explosive, or hazardous materials unless specifically approved by the Alameda County Fire Department. L. Nuisances. No Cottage Food Operation shall create or cause traffic, noise, or other nuisances beyond those normal for a residential area or which may be perceptible at or beyond the lot line as determined by the Director of Community Development. M. Outdoor Storage/Display. There shall be no outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment, appliances, tools, materials, or supplies associated with the Cottage Food Operation. N. Signs. There shall be no advertising sign, window display, or other identification of the Cottage Food Operation on the premises other than a house number and nameplate as permitted by Section 8.84.140.D (House Numbers and Name Plates). O. Delivery Trips. No Cottage Food Operation shall generate more than two delivery trips per day. No deliveries shall be made between the hours of 9:OOpm and 8:OOam. 9of10 P. Business License. A Business License is required and shall be obtained prior to establishing a Cottage Food Operation. The Business License shall remain current and valid throughout the life of the Cottage Food Operation. Q. Rented Property. If the Cottage Food Operation is to be conducted on rental property, written authorization from the property owner or property manager shall be obtained and submitted to the City when applying for a Business License. 8.65.050 Violation. Any violation of the regulations of this Chapter is subject to enforcement pursuant to Chapter 8.144 (Enforcement) and Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code. Any violation is cause for revocation of the Zoning Clearance pursuant to Chapter 8.96 (Permit Procedures) of this Code." SECTION 13: Effective Date and Posting of Ordinance This Ordinance shall take effect and be in force thirty (30) days from and after the date of its final adoption. The City Clerk of the City of Dublin shall cause this Ordinance to be posted in at least three (3) public places in the City of Dublin in accordance with Section 39633 of the Government Code of California. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED BY the City Council of the City of Dublin on this _ day of , 2014, by the following votes: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Mayor ATTEST: City Clerk 10 of 10 RESOLUTION NO. 14-XX A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING CITY COUNCIL APPROVAL OF AMENDMENTS TO DUBLIN ZONING ORDINANCE CHAPTERS 8.08 (DEFINITIONS), 8.12 (ZONING DISTRICTS AND PERMITTED USES OF LAND), 8.40 (ACCESSORY STRUCTURES AND USES REGULATIONS), 8.64 (HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS), 8.76 (OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS), AND 8.116 (ZONING CLEARANCE) AND THE CREATION OF CHAPTER 8.65 (COTTAGE FOOD OPERATIONS) EFFECTIVE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2014-00031 WHEREAS, Assembly Bill (AB) 1616 became effective on January 1, 2013 and allows individuals to prepare and/or package certain non-potentially hazardous foods in private-home kitchens referred to as "cottage food operations"; and WHEREAS, AB 1616 further requires cities and counties to allow cottage food operations in private residences but permits local ordinances that impose reasonable standards, restrictions and requirements concerning spacing and concentration, traffic control, parking and noise control; and WHEREAS, Dublin Zoning Ordinance Chapter 8.64 (Home Occupations Regulations) permits home occupations for the gainful employment of the occupant of a residential dwelling in a limited commercial activity subject to certain standards and regulations; and WHEREAS, the establishment of a cottage food operation in a residential dwelling would not be consistent with the current standards and regulations for home occupations and therefore the creation of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations) is proposed; and WHEREAS, Staff is also proposing associated Zoning Ordinance Amendments to: 1) define cottage food operations; 2) establish cottage food operations as a permitted use in agricultural and residential zoning districts; 3) establish cottage food operations as a permitted residential accessory use; 4) exclude cottage food operations from the home occupations regulations chapter; 5) establish a parking requirement for cottage food operations; and 6) require a zoning clearance permit for cottage food operations; and WHEREAS, Staff is also proposing amendments to the Home Occupations Regulations Chapter to clarify certain standards and regulations based on enforcement activity and the changing nature of home occupations in general; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the CEQA, Staff is recommending that the Planning Commission recommend that the City Council find this project exempt in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15061(b)(3) because it can be seen with certainty that the amendments to Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code (Zoning Ordinance) will not have a significant effect on the environment; and ATTACHMENT 4 WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted to the City of Dublin Planning Commission recommending City Council approval of the proposed Zoning Ordinance Amendments; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a public hearing on said application on October 28, 2014; and WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hear and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend that the City Council adopt the Ordinance attached hereto as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 28th day of October 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chair ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director 2 of 2 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS Chapter 8.64 CHAPTER 8.64 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS 8.64.010 Purpose and Intent. The purpose of this Seetion—Chapter is to allow Home Occupations for the gainful employment of the occupant of a dwelling in a limited commercial activity, with such employment activity being incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. intent. intent of this Seetien Chapter is to ensure that Home Occupations are compatible with, and do not change the character of the surrounding residential area by generating more traffic, noise, odors, visual impacts, or storage of materials than would normally be expected in a residential zoning district. 8.64.020 Business License Required. Business licenses are required for Home Occupations which are permitted as accessory uses in all residential zoning districts. No Home Occupation may be conducted until a Business License is issued pursuant to Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code. 8.64.030 Limitations on Use. A Home Occupation shall conform to the following limitations on use: A. Accessory Structure/Temporary Structure. No Home Occupation may be conducted within an Accessory Structure or a temporary structure, except for detached offices, studios, or workshops used to carry on administrative or artistic activities of a commercial nature. may be eendueted within an n eeessery S...,,,..,,,.e e a temp,,,.afy ';Irue . Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) B. Appearance of the Residence. The Home Occupation shall not alter the external appearance of the residence. C. Construction Equipment/Work Vehicles. No construction equipment or work vehicles such as plumbing vans, electronic repair vans, or similar equipment or work vehicles (except a Company Vehicle permitted by Section 8.64.030.E below), as determined by the Director of Community Development, shall be stored which is used by the occupant of the residence or his/her employees in connection with a Home Occupation. Rev. Ord. 20-06 (November 2006) D. Codes/Laws/Regulations. A Home Occupation shall conform to all applicable codes, laws and regulations of the City County, State and Federal governments. E. Company Vehicle. One company vehicle (a truck, van, or automobile only) no larger than 3/4 ton in capacity, unless otherwise approved by the Community Development Director, (whether r'Ee ith a company n°m° �may be parked in a residential zoning district and used by the occupant directly or indirectly in connection City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 64-1 August 2014 ATTACHMENT 5 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS Chapter 8.64 with a Home Occupation. The company vehicle may have a company name and/or loco adhered to it The company name and/or logo shall not exceed 9 square feet per side of the vehicle and shall not be used as a sign platform for the sole purpose of advertising, or attracting_people to,the Home Occupation. Rev. Ord. 16-02 (October 2002) F. Emergency Shelters and Transitional Housing. No Home Occupations of any nature shall be permitted to operate in an established Emergency Shelter or Transitional Housing unit. Rev. Ord. 25-04 (October 2004) G. Employees. No Home Occupation shall permit employees who do not reside in the home to gather at, or work from, the homee-p1ey individuals• o do not live in the=esiaen H. Equipment/Appliances/Storage of Materials of Non-Residential Nature. There shall be no installation of equipment or appliances or storage of materials, of a non-residential nature in a residence or Accessory Structure, as determined by the Director of Community Development. I. Fire Safety/Occupancy. Activities conducted, and equipment or material used, as part of a Home Occupation shall be restricted to residential occupancy classifications as set forth in the Building Code. The Home Occupation shall not reduce the fire safety classification of a residence or an accessory structure, or employ the storage of flammable, explosive, or hazardous materials unless specifically approved by the Alameda County Fire Department. Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) J. Incidental and Subordinate Use. A Home Occupation shall be incidental and subordinate to the residential use of the property. K. Indoors/Limited to one room. The Home Occupation, with the exception of swimming instruction, shall be conducted entirely indoors. The Home Occupation— shall be limited completely to one room located within the residence, an accessory structure, or the garage so long as the Home Occupation does not occupy a required parking space of the residence. Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) L. Merchandise For Sale, Lease Or Rent, or Services Provided From 4he Premises. No merchandise or goods shall be sold, leased or rented from the premises if the sale, lease or rental requires the customer to visit the premises for delivery. No services shall be provided from the premises if the service requires the customer to visit the premises for the service provided(except Students permitted by Section 8.64.030.S). M. Nuisances. No Home Occupation shall create or cause traffic, noise, dust, light, vibration, odor, gas, fumes, toxic/hazardous materials, smoke, glare, electrical interference, or other hazards or nuisances beyond those normal for a residential area or which may be perceptible at or beyond the lot line as determined by the Director of Community Development. City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 64-2 August 2014 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS Chapter 8.64 N. Outdoor Storage/Display. There shall be no outdoor storage or display of merchandise, equipment, appliances, tools, materials, or supplies associated with a Home Occupation. O. Parking. No vehicle used for a Home Occupation shall occupy a required parking space of a residence unless the vehicle also serves as the day-to-day personal vehicle of the individual conducting the Home Occupation. No Rome Oecupatio„ shall oeeup requir-e a par-king °page-of afesidenee. One off-street parking space (other than in the dfiveway) shall be provided for a vehicle used exclusively for the Home Occupation. P. Rented Property. If the Home Occupation is to be conducted on rental property, the written authorization to conduct the home occupation on the premises f r the propose' °° shall be obtained from the property owner or property manager and submitted to the City prior- to the application applying for a Business License. Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) Q. Signs. There shall be no advertising sign, window display, or other identification of the Home Occupation on the premises other than a house number and nameplate as permitted by Section 8.84.140.1) House Numbers and Name Plates. R. Storage. The storage of equipment, materials, wastes, and other items needed for, or produced by, the construction, landscaping, or service trades is prohibited. S. Students. No more than two students may be given instruction in music, academics, dance, swimming, or other subjects as determined by the Community Development Director in a residence at one time. No students may be given instruction between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. T. Vehicular Trips/Delivery Trips. No Home Occupation shall generate more than five additional pedestrian or vehicular trips per day. in exeess of that tsto ,,,-ily a a+°a with the - this iet in whieh it is leeatea No Home Occupation shall generate more than two delivery trips per day and no—. N-o deliveries shall be made between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. Rev. Ord. 9-03 (July 2003) 8.64.040 Prohibited Home Occupations. The following Home Occupations d any additional Home OeeupatioHsasrdetef ifled by t c Di of Community Development) are in violation of the Purpose and Intent and/or the Limitations on Use of this and are prohibited: A. Adult Businesses Establishments. B. Barber Shop or Beauty ShoptPersonal Services (excluding tutoring). C. Carpentry or cabinet making. City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 64-3 August 2014 HOME OCCUPATIONS REGULATIONS Chapter 8.64 D. Dance or night club. E. Fortune telling. F. Grooming, breeding, boarding (day or night), training or raising of dogs, cats, or other animals. G. Medical and dental offices, clinics, and laboratories. H. Mini-storage. I. Repair (body or mechanical) or reupholstering of vehicle not owned by the resident. (Note: painting of motorized vehicles or the repair and maintenance of any tractor trucks or semi-trucks is prohibited in any residential zoning district by Section 8.40.030.E.8, Accessory Structures and Uses Regulations. J. Repair Shops (of appliances, electronic equipment, furniture, and similar items as determined by the Director of Community Development), Fix-it shops, or plumbing shops. K. Resfa-uran-tEating and Drinking Establishments. L. Welding and machining. M. Other. Any other Home Occupations, as determined by the Director of Community Development, as being in violation of the Purpose and Intent of this Chapter or the Limitations of Use section. 8.64.050 Exclusions. The following uses are excluded from regulation under this Chapter. A. Cottage Food Operations. Cottage Food Operations are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.65 (Cottage Food Operations). B. Large Family Day Care Homes. Large Family Day Care Homes are subject to the provisions of Chapter 8.66 (Large Family Day Care Homes). 8.64.0-59060 Violation. Any violation of the regulations of this chapter is eause for subject to enforcement pursuant to j Chapter 8.144 (Enforcement) and Chapter 4.04 (Business Registration) of the Dublin Municipal Code. . Rev. Ord. 1-04 (January 2004) City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance 64-4 August 2014 OF Dp��� rn 1 a2 STAFF REPORT 19 .� PLANNING COMMISSION 0411�� DATE: October 28, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING: PLPA-2013-00031 Housing Element Update (2015- 2023) General Plan Amendment EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The State of California requires local governments to adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City. The Housing Element is one of seven State-mandated elements of a General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community. State law requires that Housing Elements be updated and adopted within 120 days of January 31, 2015. The Planning Commission is being asked to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and recommend City Council adoption. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission: 1) Receive Staff presentation; 2) Open the public hearing; 3) Take testimony from the public; 4) Close the public hearing and deliberate; 5) Adopt a Resolution recommending City Council adoption of a Negative Declaration for the 2015- p 9 Y p 9 2023 Housing Element; and, 6) Adopt a Resolution recommending City Council adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element Update. i i Submitted By U keviewekVBy Senior Planner Assistant Community Development Director COPIES TO. File �.. ITEM NO.: 803 _ Page 1 of 5 DESCRIPTION: Background At the May 13, 2014 Planning Commission meeting, Staff presented the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element (Attachment 1). The Planning Commission reviewed the draft Element and adopted a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft Element to the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review (Attachment 2). On June 17, 2014, the City Council reviewed the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and the Planning Commission's recommendation and adopted a Resolution directing Staff to submit the draft Element to HCD for review (Attachment 3). Staff submitted the draft Element to HCD on June 18, 2014 for a streamlined review process. HCD Streamlined Review In December 2012, the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) published their Housing Element Update Guidance to assist local governments with a streamlined update of their Housing Elements and a streamlined review by HCD. The Update Guidance is designed to create efficiencies and clarity in the housing element update process; reduce the number and scope of housing element submittals per jurisdiction; and provide for a 60 day review with priority given to jurisdictions utilizing the streamlined review process. Staff utilized the streamlined review process and on August 18, 2014 HCD issued a determination that the draft Housing Element meets the requirements of State housing element law (Attachment 4). This means that the draft Element will be certified by the State following adoption by the City. ANALYSIS: The 2015-2023 Housing Element is substantially the same as the previous 2009-2014 Housing Element. The goals and polices remain the same and many of the programs remain unchanged (refer to Attachment 1). Some of the more notable changes to the Housing Element that occurred during the revie w process with HCD include: 1 a greater emphasis on addressing the needs of extremely low income households and persons with disabilities; 2) establishing more defined timeframes and objectives for certain programs; 3) reviewing the Density Bonus Ordinance; 4) monitoring housing development; 5) reviewing the Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing and Supportive Housing Ordinances; and 6) monitoring development fees. A summary of programs and the more notable changes to them is provided below. The revised 2015-2023 Housing Element can be found in Attachment 5, Exhibit A. Programs 1-5: No changes were made to Programs 1 through 5. (Program 1: Housing Rehabilitation Assistance, Program 2: Housing Choice Voucher Rental Assistance Program 3: Code Enforcement, Program 4: Condominium Conversion Ordinance, and Program 5: Mixed Use Development). Program 6: Affordable Housing Developers. This existing Program recognizes that an adequate supply of affordable housing cannot be supplied by the market and therefore identifies ways that the City can support and assist in the development of affordable housing. Changes to this Program include placing an emphasis on supporting affordable housing projects that include units for extremely low income households and persons with disabilities with a goal of providing 20 affordable units for these special needs groups 2of5 by 2023. A new objective has also been added to this Program to contact developers annually to discuss affordable housing opportunities. Program 7: Density Bonuses. This existing Program supports the implementation of the City's Density Bonus Ordinance which encourages the production of affordable housing by offering density increases or other incentives such as reduced development standards or mixed-use zoning. Changes to this Program include: reviewing the current Density Bonus Ordinance for compliance with State law within 2 years of adopting the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and providing information on the City's affordable housing incentives on the City's website by mid-2015. Program 8-12: No substantial changes were made to Programs 8 through 12. (Program 8: Inclusionary Zoning, Program 9: Commercial Linkage Fee, Program 10: Housing Type and Size Variations, Program 11: First-Time Homebuyer Programs, and Program 12: Second Dwelling Units). Program 13: Homeless Assistance. This existing Program supports regional agencies and organizations that provide homeless services. Changes to this Program include a new objective to assist an average of 300 persons per year through the Community Support Grants program. Program 14: No changes were made to Program 14. (Program 14: Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee). Program 15: Residential Sites Inventory and RHNA Monitoring. This existing Program implements the City's Regional Housing Need Allocation (RHNA) of 2,285 units. Changes to this Program include a stronger emphasis on monitoring housing development on an on-going basis to ensure that residential projects are being proposed at appropriate densities consistent with the RHNA. Programs 16-17: No substantial changes were made to Programs 16 through 17. (Program 16: Fee Deferment or Amortization and Program 17: Universal Design Ordinance). Program 18: Emergency Shelters and Supportive and Transitional Housing. This new Program replaces Programs 21-23 of the existing Housing Element which required that the City amend the Zoning Ordinance to accommodate Emergency Shelters, Su pp ortive Housing and Transitional itional Housing. The Zoning Ordinance amendments were adopted in April 2011 consistent with the Housing Element programs for each housing type; however, HCD has identified some potential inconsistencies with State law and is requiring that these three Ordinances be re-evaluated. Specifically, the Emergency Shelters Ordinance may include some development standards that conflict with Senate v and Transitional Housing Bill 2 and some provisions of the Supportive a g Ordinances have p the potential to be misinterpreted and applied inconsistent with Senate Bill 2. Staff will review all three Ordinances within two years of adoption of the Housing Element. Program 19: Monitoring of Development Fees. This is a new Program that requires the City to monitor development fees to ensure that they are not unduly constraining the development of housing. Information on existing incentives such as fee deferral and amortization will also be provided on the City's website and to interested developers to 3 of 5 facilitate the construction of affordable units consistent with the City's Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. Programs 20-22: No substantial changes were made to Programs 20 through 22. (Program 20: Equal Housing Opportunity, Program 21: Green Building Guidelines, and Program 22: Energy Conservation). Next Steps As previously mentioned, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element will be certified by the State Department of Housing and Community Development upon adoption by the City Council. Staff is requesting that the Planning Commission review the draft Housing Element and adopt a Resolution recommending City Council adoption. Upon adoption, the Housing Element will be sent to the State and Staff will begin working on implementing the programs and objectives as outlined in the Housing Element. NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH: On February 25, 2014, a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element including the review process with the State Department of Housing and Community Development. No public comments were received at the public meeting. On May 13, 2014, a second public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to present the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and solicit input from the Commission and the public. No public comments were received at the public meeting. On June 17, 2014, a third public meeting was held with the City Council to present the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and solicit input from the Council and the public. One resident addressed the City Council and spoke about the consequences of not having a certified Housing Element. No other public comments were received at the public meeting. A public meeting notice for each of these meetings was sent to developers, service providers, housing advocates, human services task force members, current Human Services Commission members and interested parties who requested notification of public meetings related to the Housing Element update. jOn July 30, 2014, the City of Dublin received a letter on behalf of the Bay Area Business Coalition which is comprised of members of the Bay Planning Coalition Council, East Bay Leadership, Jobs & Housing Coalition, North Bay Leadership Council, San Mateo County Economic Development Association (SAMCEDA), Bay Area Council and California Apartment Association. The letter was provided to all jurisdictions within the ABAG region advocating for an adequate supply of housing. The letter requests that local jurisdictions focus on constraints to the development of housing, which is also a requirement of State law, when updating a Housing Element. Both the Bay Area Business Coalition letter and the City's response are included in Appendix A of the draft Housing Element (Attachment 5, Exhibit A, Pages A-15 through A-19). A public hearing notice for this meeting was mailed to developers, stakeholders, service providers and interested persons who have expressed an interest in receiving notices regarding the Housing Element update. The public notice was also published in the Valley Times and posted at several locations throughout the City. A copy of this Staff Report has been posted to the City's website. 4 of 5 ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared. An Initial Study was prepared to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Based on the analysis contained in the Initial Study, it has been determined that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment; therefore, a Negative Declaration has been prepared (Attachment 6, Exhibit A). The Negative Declaration was circulated for public review between September 12, 2014 and October 13, 2014. No comments were received. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Planning Commission Staff Report dated May 13, 2014. 2. Planning Commission Resolution 14-24. 3. City Council Resolution 111-14. 4. Department of Housing and Community Development letter dated August 18, 2014. 5. Resolution recommending City Council adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, with the draft City Council Resolution attached as Exhibit A and the draft Housing Element attached as Exhibit B. 6. Resolution recommending City Council adoption of a Negative Declaration for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, with the draft City Council Resolution attached as Exhibit A and the draft Negative Declaration attached as Exhibit B. 5 of 5 ui �i�✓ �� STAFF REPORT PLANNING COMMISSION r�tr<r�oR�l° DATE: May 13, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: Update to the Housing Element of the General Plan (PLPA-2013-00031) Prepared by, Mamie R. Delgado, Senior Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The State of California requires that the City Council adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City. The Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community. State law requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified no later than January 31, 2015. The City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff with the update to the City's Housing Element. The purpose of the meeting is to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and solicit feedback from the Planning Commission and interested parties. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission, 1) Receive Staffs presentation, 2) Receive comments from the public, and 3) Adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. GLO Submitted By e ' ed By Senior Planner Assistant Community Development Director COPIES TO: File ITEM NO.: Page 1 of 6 ATTACHMENT 1 DESCRIPTION: The State of California requires that the City Council adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City. The Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community. State law requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified by January 31, 2015. Having a certified Housing Element is not only required by State law but also enables the City to be more competitive for grant funding. Several housing, community development and infrastructure funding programs include housing element compliance as a rating and ranking requirement. The City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in updating the City's Housing Element for the 2015-2023 planning period. BACKGROUND: The City's current Housing Element was adopted by the City Council on March 2, 2010 and was subsequently certified by the State of California Department of Housing and Community development on May 12, 2010. The current Housing Element covers the planning period of 2009-2014. Staff and the consultant team have reviewed existing programs; evaluated the amount of land remaining for residential development; and, collected data on housing needs, housing constraints and housing resources. On February 25, 2014, a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element including the review process with the State Department of Housing and Community Development. A public meeting notice was sent to developers, service providers, housing advocates, human services task force members, current Human Services Commission members and interested parties who requested notification of public meetings related to the Housing Element update. There were no members of the public in attendance at the public meeting. This is the second public meeting on the update to the General Plan Housing Element. The Planning Commission and interested parties are being asked to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element (Attachment 1) and provide feedback. The Planning Commission is also being asked to adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review (Attachment 2). ANALYSIS: Goals and Policies The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element is substantially the same as the 2009-2014 Housing Element. The goals and policies (Attachment 1, page 5) remain the same and address the following: 2 of 6 4 Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; * Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; * Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; 4b Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and, +lip Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. One minor addition to the goals and policies is including persons with developmental disabilities as a special housing needs population within the larger category of persons with disabilities. One minor deletion to the goals and policies is removing Policy B.6 related to the redevelopment of the Arroyo Vista site (now Emerald Vista). This policy is no longer relevant as the project has been completed. All other goals and policies remain substantially the same as the current 2009- 2014 Housing Element. Housing Programs The Housing Programs (Attachment 1, page 8) implement the goals and policies of the Housing Element and are grouped into the following six categories: �I 46 Housing Conservation I i, •R Production of Housing i Provision of Adequate Housing Sites +fir Removal of Governmental Constraints +R Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity Ak Green Building Programs Changes to the Housing Programs include establishing new objectives for the 2015-2023 planning period and removing existing programs which have been completed. Completed programs include redevelopment of the Arroyo Vista site; implementation of the Dublin Transit Center master plan; adoption of a reasonable accommodation procedure; adoption of amendments to the emergency shelter and transitional housing regulations; and, adoption of regulations for supportive housing and single room occupancy units. Appendices The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes a number of appendices. Appendix A includes a summary of public participation in the update process. Appendix B includes a review of accomplishments for the previous 2009-2014 planning period. Appendix C is the technical background report and includes a housing needs assessment; analysis of housing constraints; and, analysis of housing resources. Appendix D is an inventory of vacant and underutilized properties that could contribute to meeting the City's regional housing need obligation. 3 of 6 Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) The State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) is required by law to determine the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA), by income category, for each Council of Governments (COGs) including the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG). The RHNA is based on Department of Finance population projections and regional population forecasts used in preparing regional transportation plans. ABAG is required to allocate to each locality within its region a share of housing need totaling the RHNA for each income category. Localities are required to update their housing element to plan to accommodate its entire RHNA share by income category during the specified planning period. Under the current Housing Element, which covers the 2007-2014 planning period, Dublin's share of the RHNA is 3,330 units. Dublin's share of the RHNA for the 2015-2023 planning period has been reduced by 1,045 units and is as follows: Table 1. Dublin's Re ional Housing Need Allocation RHNA Income Category Number of Units Assumed Densities 2007-2014 2015-2023 Very Low 1,092 796 Min. 22 du/acre Low 661 446 Moderate 653 425 10-21 du/acre Above Moderate/ 924 618 Less than 10 du/acre Market Rate Total 3,330 2,285 In order to meet Dublin's share of housing need, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element must show that there is an adequate amount of land at appropriate densities to achieve 2,285 housing units by income category (see Table 1 above). State law has established that lower income units are achievable on land designated for 30 dwelling units per acre or more. However, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element demonstrates that lower income units can also be achieved at 22 dwelling units per acre; moderate income units are considered achievable at 10-21 dwelling units per acre and densities less than 10 dwelling units per acre are considered above moderate/market rate. As of February 2014, seven development projects have been approved, but are not yet under construction, totaling 1,215 units of which 76 are low income and the remaining 1,139 units are above moderate/market rate (see Table 2 below). Additionally, an inventory of vacant residential sites without an approved development project have the potential to provide an additional 965 units of which 448 are at densities considered affordable to moderate income households and 517 are at densities considered affordable to above moderate/market rate households. Between the approved development projects and vacant residential sites, all of Dublin's above moderate/market rate RHNA obligation (618 units) has been satisfied and a small portion of Dublin's lower income RHNA obligation (76 of the 446 units) has been satisfied. The remaining RHNA obligation for very low (796 units), low (370 units) and moderate income (425 units) units is proposed to be satisfied-within the -Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. Amendments to the Specific Plan are currently proposed that would increase the residential development potential within each of the three Specific Plan Districts and establish minimum development densities of 22 dwelling units per acre within the Retail District and 30 dwelling units to the acre in the Transit Oriented District. The existing development density in the Village 4of6 Parkway District is a maximum of 15 dwelling units per acre and is not proposed to be changed. By increasing the residential development capacity and establishing minimum density thresholds, the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area can meet the City's remaining RHNA obligation. Table 2. Dublin's RHNA Sites Invento ry Very Low Moderate Above Total Low Moderate RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Approved Projects 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Vacant Sites 0 0 448 517 965 DDSP TOD 891 0 0 891 Retail 400 0 0 400 Village Pkwy 0 0 200 200 Surplus/Shortfall +125 +23 +1,238 +1,386 Streamlined Review In December 2012, the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) published their Housing Element Update Guidance to assist local governments with a j streamlined update and HCD review. The Update Guidance is designed to create efficiencies and clarity in the housing element update process; reduce the number and scope of housing element submittals per jurisdiction; and, provide for a 60 day review with priority given to jurisdictions utilizing the streamlined review process. The streamlined review process is designed for jurisdictions that have a certified housing element and much of the information from the previous planning period is still current and/or particular conditions and circumstances have not significantly changed since the last update. While the entire Housing Element must still be updated, HCD review will be limited to changes that have occurred since the prior planning period. HCD will not review areas that have not changed since their content continues to be sufficient to meet statutory requirements. Staff will be submitting the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element for the streamlined review process. Next Steps The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element is being presented to the Planning Commission and interested parties for feedback. The Planning Commission is also being asked to adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State Department of Housing and Community Development for review. Should the Planning Commission adopt the Resolution, Staff would present the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the City Council. If authorized by the City Council, Staff would then initiate the State's streamlined review of the Housing Element. The State would review the draft 2015- 2023 Housing Element and provide comments to Staff within 60 days of receiving the draft document. While the State is reviewing the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element, Staff would begin the environmental review process. Once the State determines that the City's Housing Element is certifiable, Staff would return to the Planning Commission and City Council for formal adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 5 of 6 NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH: A public notice was mailed to developers, stakeholders, service providers and interested persons who have expressed an interest in receiving notices regarding the Housing Element update. The public notice was also published in the Tri-Valley Times and posted at several locations throughout the City. A copy of this Staff Report has been posted to the City's website. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with the State guidelines and City environmental regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared. Staff is recommending that the review of the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element be found Categorically Exempt from the CEQA pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15306, Class 6 (information Collection). ATTACHMENTS: 1) Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element. 2) Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. 6of6 RESOLUTION NO. 14 - 24 A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL DIRECT STAFF TO SUBMIT THE DRAFT 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOR REVIEW CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, the State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified by January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in preparing the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and i WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element includes Goals and Policies that will accomplish the following: c Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; o Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; o Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; o Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and, o Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. And; WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes specific Housing Programs that will implement the Goals and Policies outlined above; and WHEREAS, the Housing Programs are grouped into the following six categories: 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing; 2. Production of Housing; 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites; 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints; 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity; and 6. Green Building Programs. ATTACHMENT 2 WHEREAS, on February 25, 2014 a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element update process including the statutory requirements of what the Housing Element must address; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014 a second public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the CEQA, the project is found to be Categorically Exempt under Section 15306, Class 6 (Information Collection) of the State of California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending that the Planning Commission review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review; and, WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hear and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13`h day of May 2014 by the following vote: AYES: Bhuthimethee, Do, O'Keefe, Kohli, Goel NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: ATT-S-T- Pla Wing Commis ion Chair Assistant Community Development Director G:IPA120131PLPA-2013-00031 Housing Element Update 20152023105.13.14 PC MeetingTCReso HE Update 05.13.14.doc 2of2 RESOLUTION NO. 111 - 14 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN DIRECTING STAFF TO SUBMIT THE DRAFT 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOR REVIEW CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, the State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified by January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in preparing the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element includes Goals and Policies that will accomplish the following: • Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; • Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; • Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; • Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and, • Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. And; WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes specific Housing Programs that will implement the Goals and Policies outlined above; and WHEREAS, the Housing Programs are grouped into the following six categories: 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing; 2. Production of Housing; 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites; 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints; 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity; and 6. Green Building Programs. WHEREAS, on February 25, 2014 a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element update process including the statutory requirements of what the Housing Element must address; and Page 1 of 2 ATTACHMENT 3 WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014 a second public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution 14-24 recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review; and WHEREAS, on June 3, 2014 a public meeting was held with the City Council to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the CEQA, the project is found to be Categorically Exempt under Section 15306, Class 6 (Information Collection) of the State of California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending that the City Council review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and adopt a Resolution directing Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review; and, WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Dublin City Council does hereby direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 17th day of June 2014 by the following vote: AYES: Councilmembers Biddle, Gupta, Haubert, and Mayor Sbranti NOES: None ABSENT: Councilmember Hart ABSTAIN: None ATTE Mayor ST: � City Clerk Reso No. 111-14,Adopted 6-17-14, Item 8.4 Page 2 of 2 STATF OF CALIEoRN1A BUS1NF134 CONSUMER SFRVICES AND HQUSING AGENCY EDMUND G BRQwN JR GovemoL DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REC EIE EC) DIVISION OF HOUSING POLICY DEVELOPMENT 2020 W. El Camino Avenue,Suite 500 AUG 2 0 2014 • �» Sacramento,CA 95833 (916)263-2911 /FAX(916)263-7453 www.hcd.ca.gov DUBLIN PLANNING August 18, 2014 Mr. Luke Sims, Director Community Development Department City of Dublin 100 Civic Plaza Dublin, CA 94568 Dear Mr. Sims: RE: City of Dublin's 5th Cycle (2014-2021) Draft Housing Element Thank you for submitting the City of Dublin's draft housing element update that was received for review on June 20, 2014, along with additional revisions received on August 7, 15 and 18, 2014. Pursuant to Government Code (GC) Section 65585(b), the Department is reporting the results of its review. The Department conducted a streamlined review of the draft housing element based on the City meeting all eligibility criteria detailed in the Department's Housing Element Update Guidance. In addition, the Department considered comments from the Bay Area Business Coalition pursuant to GC Section 65585(c). The draft element meets the statutory requirements of State housing element law. The element will comply with State housing element law (GC, Article 10.6) when adopted and submitted to the Department, in accordance with GC Section 65585(g). To remain on an eight year planning cycle, pursuant to Senate Bill 375 (Chapter 728, Statutes of 2008) the City must adopt its housing element within 120 calendar days from the statutory due date of January 31, 2015 for ABAG localities. If adopted after this date, GC Section 65588(e)(4) requires the housing element be revised every four years until adopting at least two consecutive revisions by the statutory deadline. For more information on housing element adoption requirements, please visit our website at: http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/hrc/plan/he/he review adoptionsteps110812.pdf. Public participation in the development, adoption and implementation of the housing element is essential to effective housing planning. Throughout the housing element process, the City must continue to engage the community, including commenters and organizations that represent interests related to housing and community development and lower-income and special needs households. The City should make information regularly available and consider and incorporate comments where appropriate. ATTACHMENT 4 HCD Review of Dublin's Housing Element August 18, 2014 Page 2 of 2 The Department appreciates the hard work and dedication of Ms. Marnie Delgado, Senior Planner and the City's Consultants, Ms. Veronica Tam and Ms. Jessica Suimanjaya, in preparation of the housing element and looks forward to receiving Dublin's adopted housing element. If you have any questions or need additional technical assistance, please contact Harrison Anixter, of our staff, at (916) 263-8673. Sincerely, W\�q Paul McDougall Housing Policy Mana r RESOLUTION NO. 14-XX A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING CITY COUNCIL ADOPTION OF A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT FOR THE 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and adopted within 120 days of the statutory deadline of January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in preparing the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element includes Goals and Policies that will accomplish the following: o Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; o Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; o Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; o Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and o Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments; and WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes specific Housing Programs that will implement the Goals and Policies outlined above; and WHEREAS, the Housing Programs are grouped into the following six categories: 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing; 2. Production of Housing; 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites; 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints; 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity; and 6. Green Building Programs; and ATTACHMENT 5 WHEREAS, on February 25, 2014 a public meeting was held to educate and inform the community on the Housing Element update process and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014 a second public meeting was held to review the draft 2015- 2023 Housing Element and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, on June 17, 2014 a third public meeting was held to review the draft Housing Element and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element was submitted to the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for a streamlined review process; WHEREAS, on August 18, 2014 HCD issued a determination that the draft Housing Element meets the requirements of State housing element law; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, the City prepared a Negative Declaration dated September 2014 for the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) (the "Project") which reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis of the potential environmental impacts of the Project; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution 14-XX recommending City Council adoption of a Negative Declaration; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated October 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, was submitted to the City of Dublin Planning Commission recommending City Council adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a public hearing on the Project on October 28, 2014; and WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hear and consider the Negative Declaration, all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend that the City Council adopt a Resolution adopting a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element update, with the City Council Resolution attached as Exhibit A and the 2014-2023 Housing Element attached as Exhibit B. 2 of 3 PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 28th day of October 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chair ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director GAPA120131PLPA-2013-00031 Housing Element Update 2015-2023110.28.14 PC MeetinglAtt 5 PC Reso HE.docx 3 of 3 RESOLUTION NO. XX - 14 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN ADOPTION OF A GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT FOR THE 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and adopted within 120 days of the statutory deadline of January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element includes Goals and Policies that will accomplish the following: o Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; o Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; o Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; o Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and o Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. And, WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes specific Housing Programs that will implement the Goals and Policies outlined above; and WHEREAS, the Housing Programs are grouped into the following six categories: 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing; 2. Production of Housing; 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites; 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints; 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity; and 6. Green Building Programs. EXHIBIT A TO ATTACHMENT 5 WHEREAS, on February 25, 2014 a public meeting was held is to educate and inform the community on the Housing Element update process and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014 a second public meeting was held to review the draft 2015- 2023 Housing Element and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, on June 17, 2014 a third public meeting was held to review the draft Housing Element and solicit feedback; and WHEREAS, the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element was submitted to the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for a streamlined review process; WHEREAS, on August 18, 2014 HCD issued a determination that the draft Housing Element meets the requirements of State housing element law; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, the City prepared a Negative Declaration dated September 2014 for the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) (the "Project") which reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis of the potential environmental impacts of the Project; and WHEREAS, following a noticed public hearing on October 28, 2014, the City of Dublin Planning Commission adopted Resolution 14-XX recommending City Council adoption of the Negative Declaration for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, which resolution is incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, following the noticed public hearing on October 28, 2014, the City of Dublin Planning Commission also adopted Resolution 14-XX recommending City Council adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, which resolution is incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, was submitted to the City of Dublin City Council analyzing the Negative Declaration and the 2015-2023 Housing Element and recommending adoption of the Negative Declaration and adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the City Council held a public hearing on the Project on , 2014; and WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, following the public hearing, the City Council adopted Resolution XX-14 adopting the Negative Declaration for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, which resolution is incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and consider the Negative Declaration and all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Dublin City Council does hereby adopt a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, as set forth in Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference, and finds that the amendment is in the public interest; will not have an adverse effect on health or safety or be detrimental to the public welfare; will not be injurious to property or public improvements; and, as amended, the Dublin General Plan will remain internally consistent. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this _ day of , 2014, by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Mayor ATTEST: City Clerk City of Dublin 2015-2023 Housing Element Draft August 2014 City of Dublin Community Development Department 100 Civic Plaza Dublin, CA 94568 EXHIBIT B TO ATTACHMENT 5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table of Contents Introduction...........................................................................................................................1 1. Contents of the Housing Element................................................................................1 2. Consistency with General Plan ...................................................................................2 3. Data Sources...............................................................................................................2 Evaluation of Accomplishments..........................................................................................3 Goalsand Policies................................................................................................................5 1. Range of Housing Types.............................................................................................5 2. Housing Opportunities for Segments of the Population ..............................................6 3. Maintain and Enhance Residential Neighborhoods ....................................................6 4. Promote Equal Housing Opportunities........................................................................7 5. Promote Energy Efficiency and Conservation.............................................................7 HousingPrograms................................................................................................................8 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing .........................................................8 2. Production of Housing...............................................................................................10 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites........................................................................16 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints .....................................................................17 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity..................................................................19 6. Green Building Programs..........................................................................................20 7. Quantified Objectives................................................................................................21 PublicParticipation.............................................................................................................22 1. Service Provider Interviews.......................................................................................22 2. Public Meetings.........................................................................................................23 3. Public Comments Received......................................................................................23 Appendix A: Public Participation ....................................................................................A-1 1. Interviews with Service Providers............................................................................A-1 2. Housing Element Outreach List...............................................................................A-7 3. Public Meetings.....................................................................................................A-14 4. Public Comments Received..................................................................................A-14 Appendix B: Review of Accomplishments.....................................................................B-1 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing .....................................................B-1 2. Production of Housing.............................................................................................B-3 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites.................................................................... B-10 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints ................................................................. B-11 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity.............................................................. B-14 6. Green Building Guidelines..................................................................................... B-16 Appendix C: Technical Background Report...................................................................C-1 1. Housing Needs Assessment...................................................................................C-1 A. Population Characteristics and Trends..............................................................C-2 B. Employment Profile ...........................................................................................C-5 C. Household Characteristics.................................................................................C-7 D. Special Needs Populations .............................................................................C-11 i City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) E. Housing Stock Characteristics ........................................................................C-20 F. Affordable Housing Inventory..........................................................................C-31 G. Estimates of Housing Needs...........................................................................'C-33 2. Housing Constraints..............................................................................................C-35 A. Market Constraints..........................................................................................C-35 B. Governmental Constraints...............................................................................C-37 C. Public Policy Constraints.................................................................................C-62 D. Utility and Public Service Constraints..............................................................C-63 E. Environmental Constraints..............................................................................C-65 3. Housing Resources...............................................................................................C-68 A. Regional Housing Needs Assessment(RHNA) ..............................................C-68 B. Credits against the RHNA...............................................................................C-69 C. Future Development Potential.........................................................................C-70 D. Financial Resources........................................................................................C-78 E. Administrative Resources................................................................................C-79 Appendix D: Vacant and Underutilized Sites in Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ......D-1 List of Tables Table 1: Summary of Quantified Accomplishments since 2007.......................................... C-4 Table 2: Quantified Housing Objectives: 2015-2023 ........................................................ C-19 Table C-1: Population Growth.............................................................................................C-2 Table C-2: Age Characteristics...........................................................................................C-3 Table C-3: Race/Ethnicity 2010..........................................................................................C-5 Table C-4: Employment Profile...........................................................................................C-5 Table C-5: Average Salary by Occupation, Alameda County—2013.................................C-6 Table C-6: Household Characteristics................................................................................C-7 Table C-7: Household Income Distribution.........................................................................C-8 Table C-8: Households by Income Category-2010...........................................................C-9 Table C-9: Special Needs Groups....................................................................................C-12 Table C-10: Disability Status.............................................................................................C-15 Table C-11: Developmentally Disabled Residents, by Age, for Dublin, 2014...................C-16 Table C-12: Housing Stock Growth ..................................................................................C-20 Table C-13: Housing Stock Composition: 2013................................................................C-21 Table C-14: Housing Tenure.............................................................................................C-22 Table C-15: Tenure by Household Size............................................................................C-23 Table C-16: Median Home Sales Prices: 2011-2013........................................................C-24 Table C-17: Home Asking Prices: February 2014 ............................................................C-25 Table C-18: Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 ......................................................C-25 Table C-19: Housing Affordability Matrix Alameda County...............................................C-29 Table C-20: Inventory of Assisted Rental Housing ...........................................................C-32 Table C-21: Housing Assistance Needs...........................................................................C-34 Table C-22: Disposition of Home Purchase and Improvement Loan Applications -2012 C-36 Table C-23: General Plan Land Use Element...................................................................C-38 Table C-24: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ....................................................................C-38 Table C-25: Eastern Dublin Specific Plan.........................................................................C-39 Table C-26: Western Extended Planning Area.................................................................C-40 Table C-27: Residential Development Standards.............................................................C-42 ii City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-28: Dublin Parking Requirements for Residential Uses ......................................C-44 Table C-29: Comparison of Parking Requirements for Residential Uses.........................C-45 Table C-30: Residential Uses by District...........................................................................C-46 Table C-31: Street Design Criteria....................................................................................C-52 Table C-32: Planning Division Fee Schedule....................................................................C-54 Table C-33: Development Impact Fees ............................................................................C-55 Table C-34: Regional Housing Needs Assessment(2014-2022) .....................................C-69 TableC-35: Remaining RHNA..........................................................................................C-70 TableC-36: Vacant Sites..................................................................................................C-71 Table C-37: Amendment to Downtown Dublin Specific Plan............................................C-75 Table C-38: Greater Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Projects ............................................C-76 Table C-39: Summary of Sites Inventory and Remaining RHNA......................................C-77 iii City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) List of Figures Figure C-1: Age Distribution, 1990-2010 ............................................................................C-3 Figure C-2: Race and Ethnicity, 1990-2010........................................................................C-4 Figure C-3: Average Household Size—2000-2010 ............................................................C-8 Figure C-4: Median Household Income -2011 ...................................................................C-9 Figure C-5: Overpayment by Household Income..............................................................C-11 Figure C-6: Year Structure Built........................................................................................C-21 Figure C-7: Median Home Sales Price (2013)..................................................................C-24 Figure C-8: Vacant Residential Sites................................................................................C-72 Figure C-9: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan .....................................................................C-74 iv City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Introduction This document constitutes the fifth revision to the City of Dublin Housing Element, pursuant to State law. This Housing Element covers a planning period from January 31, 2015 through January 31, 2023. The previous Housing Element was adopted by the Dublin City Council in March 2010. 1. Contents of the Housing Element The Housing Element of the General Plan is a comprehensive statement by the City of Dublin of its current and future housing needs and proposed actions to facilitate the provision of housing to meet those needs at all income levels. The policies contained in this Element are an expression of the statewide housing goal of"attaining decent housing and a suitable living environment for every California family," as well as a reflection of the unique concerns of the community. The purpose of the Housing Element is to establish specific goals, policies, and objectives relative to the provision of housing, and to adopt an action plan toward this end. In addition, the Element identifies and analyzes housing needs, and resources and constraints to meeting those needs. In accordance with State law, the Housing Element is to be consistent and compatible with other General Plan elements. Additionally, Housing Elements are to provide clear policy and direction for making decisions pertaining to zoning, subdivision approval, housing allocations, and capital improvements. State law (Government Code Sections 65580 through 65589) mandates the contents of the Housing Element. By law, the Housing Element must contain: • An assessment of housing needs and an inventory of resources and constraints relevant to meeting those needs; • A statement of the community's goals, quantified objectives, and policies relevant to the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing; and • A program that sets forth a schedule of actions that the local government is undertaking or intends to undertake to implement the policies and achieve the goals and objectives of the Housing Element. Although, by nature of the State mandate, the Housing Element has a strong focus on the affordability and availability of housing for low and moderate income households, the Element must also address the housing needs and related policy issues for the entire community and be consistent with the adopted policies of the General Plan. For these reasons, the updated Housing Element strives to balance the desire of residents to maintain the character of existing residential neighborhoods, manage traffic and congestion, and minimize visual and other impacts of new development, while addressing the needs of low and moderate income households and special needs groups (such as seniors and persons with disabilities). This balance will require the City to examine strategies to accommodate higher density housing, mixed-use projects in commercial zones, infill developments, and second units without sacrificing other legitimate community goals. 1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Consistency with General Plan The Dublin General Plan consists of the following elements: 1) Land Use; 2) Parks and Open Space; 3) Schools, Public Lands, and Utilities; 4) Circulation and Scenic Highways; 5) Housing; 6) Conservation; 7) Seismic Safety and Safety; 8) Noise; 9) Community Design and Sustainability; 10) Economic Development; and, 11) Water Resources. The Housing Element complements other General Plan elements and is consistent with the policies and proposals set forth by the General Plan. For example, residential densities established in the Land Use Element are incorporated within the Housing Element and form the basis for establishing the residential capacity within the City. Environmental constraints identified in the Seismic Safety and Safety Element are also recognized in the Housing Element. When an element in the General Plan is amended, the Housing Element will be reviewed and modified if necessary to ensure continued consistency among the various elements. The Safety and Conservation Elements of the General Plan include an analysis and policies regarding flood hazard and management information. The City will ensure that updates to these Elements achieve internal consistency with the Housing Element as well. 3. Data Sources In preparing the Housing Element, various sources of information are consulted. The 2010 Census provides the basis for population and household characteristics. Although dated, no better source of information on demographics is widely accepted. In addition, the 2010 Census must be used in the Housing Element to ensure consistency with other Regional, State, and Federal housing plans. However, several sources are used to provide reliable updates of the 2010 Census including the following: • Population and housing estimates by the State Department of Finance; • Labor market statistics by the State Employment Development Department; • Housing market information (including www.realtor.com, www.danews.com, www.rents.com, www.zillow.com); • Special studies and reports on housing issues and market conditions, e.g. Continuum of Care Strategy for the Homeless and Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness; and • Lending patterns for home purchase and home improvement loans from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act(HMDA)data. 2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Evaluation of Accomplishments In order to craft an effective strategy to address the housing needs of the community, the City must evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of existing housing programs and actions. Government Code Section 65588(a) requires each jurisdiction to review its housing element as frequently as appropriate to evaluate: • The appropriateness of the housing goals, objectives, and policies in contributing to the attainment of the state housing goal; • The effectiveness of the housing element in attainment of the community's housing goals and objectives; and • The progress of the city, county or city and county in implementation of the housing element. Table 1 summarizes the City's quantified accomplishments under the 2009-2014 Housing Element. A program-level review is included in the Technical Report. Overall, the City has been effective in implementing the goals and objectives in the previous Housing Element. Through planned development, and master and specific planning processes, the City was able to achieve a significant portion of its Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA)for the planning period. In November 2007, Windstar Communities was approved to construct 309 high density residential units located adjacent to the West Dublin Bay Area Rapid Transit(BART) Station. The project was subsequently purchased by Essex and the project completed construction in March 2014. In August 2008, Avalon Bay Communities completed construction of a mixed-use project consisting of 305 high density residential units and approximately 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial at the Dublin Transit Center. The project, now known as Eclipse at Dublin Station, is an apartment community with 10 percent of the units set aside for moderate income households. In March 2011, Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct an additional 505 high density residential apartment units at the Dublin Transit Center. 10 percent of the units will be set aside for moderate income households. The project is currently under construction, with half of the units already completed. In April 2012, Signature Properties completed construction of the Tralee mixed-use project which includes 130 apartment units over 34,950 square feet of ground floor commercial. Shea Homes is currently constructing the remainder of the 103 townhouse units which are also a part of the Tralee project. The City also worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of the Arroyo Vista mixed-income redevelopment project. The City provided application/technical assistance, as well as financial assistance, as needed by the developer in order to secure financing and other sources of funding to support the 3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) development of the project. The project was approved by the Dublin City Council in September 2009 and includes the demolition of 150 existing affordable housing units and the construction of 378 new housing units (both attached and detached) including market rate, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and community building. The project includes 194 (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units) affordable units in various income categories. The project was completed in May 2013; all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased and all 14 affordable for-sale units have been sold. In addition, the City continues to implement its Density Bonus, Inclusionary Zoning Regulations, and Commercial Linkage Fee programs, which have been instrumental in the creation of affordable housing in Dublin. Between 2007 and 2013, the City issued 332 permits for construction of affordable housing units, including: 189 very low income units, 99 low income units, and 44 moderate income units. Since 2007, the Alameda County Community Development Agency has assisted 36 Dublin households through the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs. In addition, as of February 2014, a total of 365 Dublin households were receiving rental assistance through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. A total of 26 Dublin households were on the waiting list for rental assistance. In addition, between 2007 and 2013, the City assisted a total of 54 households with first-time homebuyer loans, including: 2 very low income, 1 low income, 44 moderate income, and 7 market households. The City also adopted amendments to the Zoning Ordinance to include provisions for emergency shelters, transitional housing, supportive housing and SROs in April 2011. The City will continue to facilitate the development of housing for persons with disabilities and extremely low income households using in-lieu fees. Table 1: Summary of Quantified Accomplishments Since 2007 Housing Housing Assistance Type Element RHNA Accomplishments* Goals Housing Units to be Constructed Very Low Income(0-50%AMI) 400 1,092 189 Low Income(51-80%AMI) 661 85 Moderate Income(81-120%AMI) 410 653 44 Upper Income(>120%AMI) 800 924 2,326 Total 1,610 3,330 2,644 Housing Rehabilitation Very Low Income(0-50%AMI) 20 --- 17 Low Income(51-80%AMI) 25 - 12 Total 45 --- 36 Source:City of Dublin,2014. Note: *New construction units based on building permits issued. 4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Goals and Policies This section of the Housing Element contains the goals and policies the City of Dublin intends to implement to meet its quantified objectives and address a number of important housing-related issues. The following major issue areas are addressed by the goals and policies of this Element: • Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of the existing and future residents; • Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; • Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; • Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and • Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. 1. Range of Housing Types Continuing to provide a balanced inventory of housing in terms of types (e.g., single-family, duplexes, apartments, condominiums, and mixed-use), cost, and style will allow the City to fulfill a variety of housing needs. In addition, providing regulatory and financial assistance as available will be essential to support the production of affordable housing. GOAL A: Expand housing choice and multi-modal transportation opportunities for existing and future Dublin residents. Policy A.1: Ensure the provision of a variety of housing types to fulfill regional housing needs. Policy A.2: Facilitate development of affordable housing through use of financial and/or regulatory incentives, where appropriate and subject to funding availability. Policy A.3: Maintain streamlined procedures for processing new residential development applications. Policy AA: Encourage the development of residential units intended for the special groups, including seniors, large households, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), and the homeless. Policy A.5: Promote affordable housing opportunities within Mixed-Use areas adjacent to public transportation and within walking or cycling distance to places of employment, commerce, recreation and near services. Policy A.6: Support existing emergency shelter programs in the Tri-Valley area. Policy A.7: Encourage greater access to housing for persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities). 5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Housing Opportunities for Segments of the Population New construction is a major source of housing for prospective homeowners and renters but generally requires public sector support for the creation of units affordable to lower income households, especially extremely low income households. A key element in satisfying the housing needs of all segments of the community is the provision of adequate sites for housing of all types, sizes, and prices. The City's General Plan and Zoning Ordinance determine where housing may locate, thereby affecting the supply of land available for residential development. The following goals and policies support the expansion of housing opportunities in Dublin. GOAL B: Expand housing opportunities for all segments of Dublin's population. Policy B.1: Encourage development of affordable housing by non-profit organizations primarily engaged in housing construction or management. Policy B.2: Provide ongoing support to affordable housing developers. Policy B.3: Negotiate with developers to encourage the provision of housing that is affordable to extremely low income households. Policy B.4: Continue to allow second dwelling units on single-family parcels as a means of expanding rental housing opportunities. Policy B.5: Continue to support the development of affordable homeownership housing for first-time homebuyers. 3. Maintain and Enhance Residential Neighborhoods In general, housing over 30 years old may be in need of major rehabilitation, such as a new roof, repair of termite damage, foundation work, and plumbing, etc. With approximately 29 percent of Dublin's housing stock built prior to 1980, preventive maintenance is essential to avoid housing deterioration. Some households, particularly those that have owned their homes for many years and have relatively low house payments, may be able to afford repairs or monthly payments for rehabilitation loans; however, others, especially lower income homeowners, may have difficulty maintaining their homes. Assisting these households will help preserve and improve the City's existing housing stock. GOAL C: Use public and private resources to maintain and enhance existing residential neighborhood characteristics. Policy CA: Continue to provide assistance for the rehabilitation of substandard and deteriorating units. Policy C.2: Encourage the preservation, rehabilitation or, if necessary, replacement of single-family units in order to maintain and enhance the established characteristics of City neighborhoods. 6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 4. Promote Equal Housing Opportunities The City seeks to expand the range of housing opportunities in Dublin, including housing for seniors on fixed incomes, lower and moderate income residents, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), large families, female-headed households with children, and the homeless. In order to make adequate provision for the housing needs of all segments of the community, the City must also ensure equal and fair housing opportunities are available to all residents. GOAL D: Provide housing opportunities for all Dublin residents, regardless of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, age, gender, marital status, familial status, disability, source of income, sexual orientation, or any other arbitrary factor. Policy D.1: Support services and programs that fight housing discrimination; direct persons towards agencies that provide assistance to victims of discrimination. Policy D.2: Promote housing along with supportive services, including child care, to meet the special housing needs of seniors, persons with disabilities, single-parents and the homeless. Policy D.3: Encourage the provision of housing to meet the needs of families of all sizes. 5. Promote Energy Efficiency and Conservation Energy conservation can be achieved through environmentally sensitive site planning techniques and implementing building codes that require use of construction materials that maximize energy efficiency. Conserving energy has the dual benefit of reducing housing costs and improving environmental quality. GOAL E: Promote energy efficiency and conservation throughout Dublin. Policy E.1: Promote the use of Green Building techniques in all residential development. Policy E.2: Ensure all new residential development complies with the California Green Building Code and City of Dublin Green Building Ordinance. Policy E.3: Continue to require the recycling of construction waste. Policy EA: Utilize site planning techniques to allow passive energy efficiencies through solar access, landscaping, and building orientation. Policy E.5: Seek opportunities to educate the public about energy conservation. 7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Programs The goals and policies outlined in the prior section address Dublin's identified housing needs, and are implemented through a series of housing programs offered primarily through the Planning and Housing Divisions of the City's Community Development Department. Dublin residents may also be eligible for assistance under programs administered by the County of Alameda. Housing programs define the specific actions the City will undertake to achieve the stated goals and policies. The City's housing programs for addressing community housing needs are described according to the following issue areas: • Housing Conservation • Production of Housing • Provision of Adequate Housing Sites • Removal of Governmental Constraints • Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity • Green Building Programs The housing programs presented on the following pages include existing programs as well as various revised and new programs that have been added to address the City's unmet housing needs and to respond to new State laws. 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing Conserving and improving the housing stock is an important goal for the City of Dublin. Approximately 29 percent of housing units in Dublin were constructed prior to 1980 and are therefore likely to have rehabilitation needs, including new plumbing, roof repairs, foundation work and other repairs. The City supports neighborhood preservation and improvement through housing rehabilitation programs and code enforcement. Other housing conservation needs of the City include existing multi-family rental apartments at-risk of converting to condominiums. Program 1: Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Alameda County administers the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds on behalf of the City. Using CDBG funds, the Alameda County Community Development Agency administers the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs for the City. Low- interest loans up to $1,500 are available to lower income households through the Minor Home Improvement Program. The Major Home Improvement Program makes available loans up to $60,000 at a three-percent annual interest rate for qualified lower income households. Between 2007 and 2013, the Alameda County Community Development Agency has facilitated 12 minor home repair projects, eight paint grants, 11 major rehabilitation projects, and five accessibility grants in Dublin. Accessibility grants benefit persons with disabilities. 8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: CDBG Implementation Alameda County Community Development Agency Responsibility: • Continue to support the Alameda County Community Timeframe and Development Agency to implement the Minor and Major Home Objectives: Improvement Programs (including accessibility grants)with the goal of assisting 32 households over eight years. Relevant Policies: Policy C.1; Policy C.2 Program 2: Housing Choice Voucher Rental Assistance The Housing Choice Voucher Program extends rental subsidies to extremely low and very low income households, including families, seniors, and the disabled. The program offers a voucher that pays the difference between the current fair market rent (FMR) as established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and what a tenant can afford to pay (i.e. 30 percent of household income). The Housing Authority of the County of Alameda administers the program in Dublin. Given the continued need for rental assistance, the City supports and encourages the provision of additional subsidies through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. Financing: HUD Section 8 Implementation Housing Authority of the County of Alameda Responsibility: • Continue to support the assistance of 350 lower income Timeframe and households each year throughout the planning period. Objectives: • Continue to refer interested households and homeowners to the Housing Authority of the County of Alameda. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 Program 3: Code Enforcement The Planning and Building Divisions of the Community Development Department carry out code enforcement and inspection activities as a means to preserve and maintain the livability and quality of neighborhoods. City staff investigates violations of property maintenance standards as defined in the Municipal Code as well as other complaints. When violations are identified or cited, staff encourages property owners to seek assistance through available housing rehabilitation programs. The City will continue to enforce property maintenance standards and abate substandard structures through Code Enforcement. When code violations are unable to be resolved through voluntary compliance or through the nuisance abatement procedure, the City refers such cases to the City Attorney for prosecution. The City Attorney's office may seek injunctions, receivership and civil lawsuits to achieve compliance with City codes. 9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: General fund Implementation Community Development Department, Planning & Building Divisions Responsibility: • Continue to enforce local ordinances relating to property maintenance and substandard housing both proactively and on a Timeframe and complaint basis. Objectives: • Conduct approximately 2,000 residential inspections during the planning period. • Perform annual review of City ordinances. Relevant Policies: Policy C.1; Policy C.2 Program 4: Condominium Conversion Ordinance The City values its rental housing stock as an important means of meeting the housing needs of all income segments of the community. In 2005, the City Council passed a Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing rental housing stock. The ordinance establishes an annual maximum number of rental apartment units that can be converted to seven percent of the total number of multi-family units in developments of 21 or more rental units. The Ordinance also establishes tenant notification and relocation assistance requirements, limits rent increases once a notice of intent to convert has been filed, and gives tenants the right to purchase units. New condominium conversions are also subject to the City's Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. The City will continue to implement the Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing multi-family rental housing stock in Dublin. Financing: Permit processing fees Implementation Community Development Department, Planning Division Responsibility: Timeframe and Monitor conversion activities annually. Objectives: Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy B.5 2. Production of Housing The City of Dublin implements various programs to encourage a diversity of housing types. Part of this diversity is addressed through the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA), which encourages the construction of housing for all economic segments in the community. Housing diversity is important to ensure that all households, regardless of age, income level, and household type, have the opportunity to find housing suited to their need and lifestyle. The following programs support the provision of additional housing opportunities in Dublin. Program 5: Mixed Use Development Locating high density residential uses in compact mixed-use areas where residents have convenient access to jobs, shopping, services, recreation, and multi-modal transportation options can produce a number of community benefits. For example, traditionally non- residential areas may be suitable to provide additional capacity for higher density housing. Many residents within these areas are also less dependent upon private automobile travel, often resulting in positive environmental effects and more money for other necessary expenses. 10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City will continue to promote high-density residential mixed-use projects in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area and adjacent to or in close proximity to the City's two Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Stations provided that infrastructure can support higher densities. The City will undertake the following actions to promote mixed-use: • Promote mixed-use opportunity sites; • Continue to implement the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan; • Use the Planned Development process to allow flexible development standards such as alternatives for parking, building height, floor-area ratio, lot-coverage limits, and residential density, to promote mixed-use developments; and • Provide incentives for affordable housing in mixed-use projects, including reduced parking requirements, use of Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund, assistance in accessing state and federal subsidies, and density bonuses. Financing: Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department, Planning Division Responsibility: Timeframe and Facilitate the construction of 100 high-density residential units Objectives: within mixed-use developments within the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.5; Policy B.2; Policy B.5 Program 6: Affordable Housing Developers Recognizing that an adequate supply of affordable housing cannot be supplied by the market, the City will cooperate with developers that specialize in below market rate housing to expand the supply of units affordable to lower income households, including extremely low income households. The City has an excellent track record in facilitating the development of affordable housing. Camellia Place, the Groves at Dublin Ranch, Wicklow Square, and the new Emerald Vista (formerly Arroyo Vista) projects all include a range of affordable units, including units for extremely low households. The City will offer assistance in accessing local, state, and federal funding for affordable housing by: 1) applying for such funding on behalf of affordable housing developers when eligible applicants are limited to public agencies; or 2) providing technical assistance or documentation necessary to support applications for funding by affordable housing developers upon request. The City can help locate potential sources of matching funds and provide other technical assistance. Technical assistance will include, but not be limited to the provision of data or documents within the City's possession that will contain necessary information or assist in the preparation of a successful grant application. The City can also write letters of support (for projects that have received permit approvals by the City). 11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Negotiate specific incentives package for each project, with increased incentives for projects that include units for extremely low income households and persons with disabilities. • Provide application/technical assistance as needed. Timing of applications or technical assistance will depend on application deadlines for funding sources. Timeframe and . Provide assistance to affordable housing developers within the Objectives planning period to facilitate the construction of 100 affordable housing units within the planning period, with the goal of achieving 20 affordable units for extremely low income households and/or persons with special needs (including persons with disabilities/development disabilities). • Annually contact developers to discuss affordable housing opport unities. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 7: Density Bonuses The City adopted a Density Bonus Ordinance in March 2007 to comply with State law (SB 1818 enacted 2005 and SB 435 enacted 2006). Only one developer has applied for and received a density bonus since adoption of the City's Density Bonus Ordinance. Density bonuses are infrequently used in Dublin because the City's High Density Residential land use designation allows 25 units per acre and up, without a maximum upper density limit. In addition to density increases, the Density Bonus Ordinance has other provisions that could facilitate the expansion of housing opportunities. The City will review its local Density Bonus Ordinance, and, as necessary, revise the Density Bonus Ordinance to ensure the benefits of the Density Bonus Ordinance when the inclusionary requirement triggers units that meet eligibility criteria for the Density Bonus Ordinance, in compliance with State law. The City will work with developers on a case-by-case basis to provide regulatory concessions and incentives to assist with the development of affordable and senior housing. In a relatively small city like Dublin, this is the most effective method of assisting developers, as each individual project can be analyzed to determine which concessions and incentives would be the most beneficial to the project's feasibility. Regulatory concessions and incentives could include, but are not limited to, reductions in the amount of required on-site parking, and modified or waived development standards. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: Cit Council • Review and, as necessary, revise the Density Bonus Ordinance Timeframe and to ensure compliance with State Law within two years of adoption Objectives: 2015-2023 Housing Element. • Continue to implement the Density Bonus Ordinance and provide information on the Ordinance to developers and other interested 12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) parties. • Provide information on the City's affordable housing incentives, such as density bonus and fee deferment or amortization, on the City's website by mid-2015. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 8: Inclusionary Zoning Under the City's Inclusionary Zoning program, all new residential development projects of 20 units or more designed and intended for permanent occupancy must construct 12.5 percent of the total number of dwelling units within the development as affordable units. Of the affordable rental units, 30 percent must be set aside for very low income households, 20 percent for low income households, and 50 percent for moderate income households; of the owner occupied affordable units, 40 percent must be set aside for low income households and 60 percent for moderate income households. Upon request, the City Council can allow the applicant to pay a fee in-lieu of constructing up to 40 percent of the affordable units that the developer would otherwise be required to construct. In certain instances, the City Council may allow a developer to construct the affordable units "off-site" and an applicant may dedicate land to the City or City-designated local non-profit housing developer in-lieu of construction of some or all of the required affordable units. In-lieu fees will be placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. The Ordinance provides for five exceptions to the 12.5 percent affordability requirement (Section 8.68.040): • Payment of in-lieu fees; • Off-site projects; • Land dedication; • Credit transfers; and • Waiver of requirements. This last exception, waiver of requirements, gives the City Council flexibility to make exceptions to the Ordinance. Also, Section 8.68.070 provides incentives to make the construction of affordable units more feasible, including: • Fee Deferral—processing and impact fees • Design Modifications- - Reduced lot size - Reduced setback requirements - Reduced open space requirements - Reduced landscaping requirements - Reduced interior or exterior amenities - Reduction in parking requirements - Height restriction waivers Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council. Timeframe and Facilitate the construction of 100 affordable housing units either Objectives: through direct construction or through the Inclusionary Housing 13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) In-Lieu Fund within the planning period. Relevant Policies: I Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 9: Commercial Linkage Fee The City approved a Commercial Linkage Fee on May 3, 2005. Fees are charged to non- residential developments, based on the square footage and type of commercial building space and placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. Since 2007, the City has collected a total of $418,145 in Commercial Linkage Fees. The In-Lieu Fee Fund has a balance of $7,013,816 as of April 1, 2014. The funds are to be used in accordance with Section 8.68.080 of the Zoning Ordinance, summarized as follows: • Affordable housing construction loans; • First Time Homebuyer Loan Program; • Homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services; • Housing Division's administrative costs; and • Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Financing: Inclusionary In-Lieu Fee Fund; Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: Cit Council • Facilitate the construction of 50 affordable housing units within the planning period (10 extremely low/very low, 15 low, and 25 moderate income units). Timeframe and • Assist five moderate income households with first-time Objectives: homebuyer loans. • Provide funding towards homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services, rental assistance programs and the Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 10: Housing Type and Size Variations A diverse housing stock in terms of type and size is necessary to meet the needs of all community residents. As a means of achieving housing diversity, the City will continue to require diversity of housing type and size as part of its negotiated process through specific plans, planned developments, and development agreements. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: Cit Council Timeframe and Require that developers provide a diversity of housing type and Objectives: size on a case-by-case basis to meet the City's housing needs throughout the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.4; Policy A.6; Policy A.7; Policy B.1; Policy B.3; Policy B.4; Policy B.5; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 Program 11: First-Time Homebuyer Programs In 2006, the City initiated a First Time Homebuyer Loan Program (FTHLP) to assist households with financing towards the purchase of a home. The FTHLP program provides 30-year deferred loans for households earning up to 120 percent of the County median 14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) income. The FTHLP program may be used in conjunction with the Alameda County Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCC) program and assistance from the City's Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund and other state or federal home ownership programs. Financing: MCC; HOME; Inclusionary Housing In-Lieu Fund Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Assist 20 income-qualified first time homebuyers during the Timeframe and planning period. Strive to provide assistance to approximately 10 Objectives above moderate income and 10 moderate income households. • Continue to distribute FTHLP application packets at the Civic Center, City website, and locations that provide housing services. Relevant Policies: Policy B.5; Policy B.6 Program 12: Second Dwelling Units Second dwelling units can be a source of affordable housing with limited impacts on existing neighborhoods and public infrastructure. The City will promote the development of second units on lots with existing single-family homes as well as in new construction. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission Responsibility: • Market this program through an informational brochure. The Timeframe and brochure will be available on the City web site and at the Civic Objectives: Center, library, senior center, and other public locations. • Facilitate the construction of 30 second dwelling units within the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy BA Program 13: Homeless Assistance The City will continue to support the Alameda County Homeless Continuum of Care Council (HCCC) and support agencies and organizations that seek to address the problem of homelessness throughout the region. Dublin provided funding to the Alameda Countywide HCCC for development of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). The HMIS is intended to collect and report information about the homeless population and its patterns of service utilization. The City also provides Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds to the Tri-Valley Haven to assist a domestic violence shelter (Shiloh) and a homeless shelter(Sojourner House), both located in Livermore. 15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: CDBG; Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: Cit Council • Continue to fund emergency shelter programs in the Tri-Valley area to house residents in need of emergency shelter. Annually Timeframe and evaluate the homeless service needs as part of the Community Objectives: Support Grants program, with the objective of assisting an average of 300 persons each year. • Continue to participate in regional collaborations to address homelessness. Relevant Policies: Policy A.4; Policy A.6; Policy D.2 Program 14: Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee The City is an active partner with the Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee and assists with organization of the Affordable Housing Fair. The purpose of the Affordable Housing Fair is to educate residents, developers, non-profit organizations, and decision-makers about affordable housing sites and resources available in the region. The City will continue to seek grants and partnerships with housing providers, civic organizations, and neighboring cities to defray costs associated with this fair. The City will also continue to support local housing service providers which are coordinated by the Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: Timeframe and Participate in at least one affordable housing fair annually Objectives: throughout the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy D.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites Meeting the housing needs of all segments of the community requires the provision of adequate sites for all types, size and prices of housing. The City's General Plan and Zoning Ordinance determine where housing may locate, thereby affecting the supply of land available for residential development. Program 15: Residential Sites Inventory and RHNA Monitoring The City will continue to use specific plans, planned development, and zoning to ensure that adequate sites are available (as defined by state housing element law, Government Code section 65583) to accommodate the City's Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for all income groups. The City will monitor housing development citywide on an ongoing basis to ensure that the sites identified in the Residential Sites Inventory are developed at densities appropriate for fulfilling its RHNA requirement for the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Should a project be approved on a site with a lower density than that identified in the Residential Sites Inventory, the City will assess its continued ability to accommodate the RHNA. Should the project 16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) result in a shortfall in sites, the City will identify additional sites to replenish the sites inventory. Each year, as part of the City's annual evaluation of its implementation of the General Plan, the City will compare the remaining supply of land by zoning, specific plan, or planned development in relation to the City's remaining unmet RHNA. Should the City identify a potential shortage of sites with appropriate densities, it will use the specific plan and planned development process to provide adequate sites for future residential developments. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Monitor housing development on an ongoing basis to ensure that the sites identified in the Residential Sites Inventory are developed at densities appropriate for fulfilling the City's RHNA Timeframe and and identify additional sites as necessary. Objectives: • Annually evaluate the land availability to meet the remaining RHNA. Ensure adequate capacity exists to accommodate the RHNA of 2,285 units (796 very low, 446 low, 425 moderate, and 618 above moderate income units). Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.5; Policy B.6 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints Under State law, the Housing Element must address, and where legally possible, remove governmental constraints affecting the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing. The following programs are designed to mitigate government constraints on residential development and facilitate development of housing affordable to lower and moderate income households, including families, seniors, and persons with special needs. Program 16: Fee Deferment or Amortization The City will continue to offer deferment or amortization of planning/development fees for senior housing units and affordable units for lower and moderate income households to reduce the initial cost impact on an affordable housing project. The City will determine on a case-by-case basis the financial need of the project and the most appropriate type of assistance based on the City's Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance. Financing: Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council • Continue to offer the deferment or amortization of fees as an Timeframe and option to interested parties. Objectives: 0 Provide information on the City's affordable housing incentives, such as density bonus and fee deferment or amortization, on the Cit 's website by mid-2015. Relevant Policies: Policy A.2 17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Program 17: Universal Design Ordinance In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. In 2010, the Ordinance was amended to meet the current building code and took effect January 1, 2011. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City has developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance and updates it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. Financing: Permit processing fees Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: Timeframe and Continue to make the brochure and other related information Objectives: available on the City's website and at the public counter. Relevant Policies: Policy A.4; Policy A.7 Program 18: Emergency Shelters and Supportive and Transitional Housing Pursuant to the provisions of SIB 2, the City will continue to facilitate the establishment of emergency shelters, transitional housing and supportive housing. With approximately 180 acres of land in the M-1 (Light Industrial) and similar PD (Planned Development) zoning districts, there is sufficient land available for at least one emergency shelter. The City will review, and revise as appropriate, zoning, development standards, and procedures for consistency with GC Section 65583(a)(4). Specifically, the City will review the distance requirements from public transit and noise provisions for emergency shelters to ensure compliance with SB 2. In order to clarify that transitional and supportive housing are residential uses subject only to the same standards and procedures as apply to other residential uses of the same type in the same zone, the City will review the Zoning Ordinance and if necessary amend the Zoning Ordinance within two years of adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element to ensure that City regulations are in conformance with state law. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Review and amend, if necessary, the Emergency Shelters Ordinance within two years of adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Timeframe and Element. Objectives: • Review and amend, if necessary, the transitional and supportive housing provisions of the Zoning Ordinance within two years of adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.4; Policy A.6; Policy A.7; Policy D.2 Program 19: Monitoring of Development Fees The City of Dublin facilitates and encourages the development of a variety of housing in the community. On a regular basis, the City monitors its development fees to ensure they are 18 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) reasonable and do not unduly constraining development, while protecting the quality, health, and public safety of the community. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • As changes are made to the development fees, the City will Timeframe and evaluate their impact on housing development and make Objectives: adjustments or mitigation as appropriate (such as continuing to offer fee deferral and amortization (Program 16). Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity To adequately meet the housing needs of all segments of the community, the Housing Plan must include program(s) that promotes housing opportunities for all persons regardless of race, religion, sex, family status, marital status, ancestry, national origin, color, age, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, source of income, or any other arbitrary factor. Program 20: Equal Housing Opportunity The City of Dublin contracts through Alameda County with ECHO Housing to investigate fair housing complaints and provide fair housing counseling and mediation services. The City is the point-of-contact for fair housing complaints, information requests, and referrals to ECHO housing. Financing: CDBG; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; ECHO Housing; and Alameda Responsibility: County Community Development Agency Provide referrals to appropriate agencies for services. • Distribute fair housing information to public locations. Timeframe and • Post information on the City website. Objectives: 0 Distribute information to real estate agents, rental property owners/managers, and financial institutions in Dublin. • Participate in Alameda County's Impediments to Fair Housing Study through the CDBG program. Relevant Policies: Policy D.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 19 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 6. Green Building Programs Green building refers to the use of environmentally preferable practices and materials in the design, location, construction, operation, and disposal of buildings. It applies to both renovation and retrofitting of existing buildings and construction of new buildings, whether residential or commercial, public or private. By continually improving how to locate, design, build, operate, and retrofit buildings, the City of Dublin can contribute to the improvement of the environment and quality of life. Advanced energy-saving technologies applied in buildings can result in enormous reductions in demand for fossil fuels and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Better design and building practices can also help address environmental challenges such as natural resource depletion; waste disposal; and air, water, and soil pollution. Green building can also help achieve gains in human health and prosperity. Program 21: Green Building Guidelines The City Council has established as a high priority to enhance residential green building requirements to create a mandatory Green Building self-certification program as part of the permitting process. The City adopted a Green Building Ordinance in April 2009. The Ordinance applies to all residential projects over 20 units. In November 2010, the Ordinance was updated and the changes went into effect January 1, 2012. A brochure was developed in 2009 at the time of the original adoption and the City continues to update the brochure as revisions are made to the Ordinance. Financing: Permit processing fees; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department, Building Division Responsibility: • Continue to implement the provisions of the Green Building Ordinance. Timeframe and • Continue to update brochures that describe program Objectives: requirements and make them available to any interested parties and continue to provide Green Building resources on the City's website. Relevant Policies: Policy E.1; Policy E.2; Policy E.3; Policy E.4 Program 22: Energy Conservation The City will promote energy conservation through the following actions: • Continue to implement the Waste Management Authority's model ordinance on recycling of construction waste. • Continue to implement state building standards (Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations) regarding energy efficiency in residential construction. • Continue to provide on-site training for City Building and Planning Staff on Green building techniques. • Continue to review proposed developments for solar access, site design techniques, and use of landscaping that can increase energy efficiency and reduce lifetime energy costs without significantly increasing housing production costs. 20 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Provide access to information on energy conservation and financial incentives (tax credit, utility rebates, etc.) through public information to be provided at the City's public counter, on the City's web site, at public libraries and community centers. Financing: Permit processing fees; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department, Building Division Responsibility: Timeframe and Implement applicable Waste Management and Building Code Objectives: regulations, provide Green Building training to City staff, and distribute energy conservation information to the public. Relevant Policies: Policy E.1; Policy E.2; Policy E.3; Policy E.4; Policy E.5 7. Quantified Objectives The City of Dublin summarizes the program objectives for the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Quantified Housing Objectives: 2015-2023 RHNA Home Repair/ Rental Home At-Risk Income Category (Construction) Rehabilitation Assistance Purchase Housing Assistance Extremely Low 398 0 0 0 Income Very Low Income 398 16 350 0 0 Low Income 446 16 0 0 Moderate Income 425 0 0 10 0 Above Moderate 618 0 0 10 0 Income Total 2,285 32 350 20 0 21 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Public Participation Section 65583 (c)(6)(B) of the Government Code states that "The local government shall make diligent effort to achieve public participation of all the economic segments of the community in the development of the housing element and the program shall describe this effort." The City of Dublin undertook a comprehensive public participation program in the development of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 1. Service Provider Interviews As part of this Housing Element update, the City of Dublin consulted with affordable housing developers and nonprofit service providers to obtain input on housing needs and suggestions for housing programs. Fifteen agencies and developers that serve lower and moderate income households, as well as those with special housing needs, were contacted. Seven agencies participated in the telephone interviews and these are: Abode Services/Allied Housing; Community Resources for Independent Living; Eden I & R; Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley; Satellite Affordable Housing Associates; Tri-Valley Haven; and Tri-Valley Reach. Their comments are summarized below: • Affordable Housing: There is significant demand for additional affordable rental and ownership housing to accommodate the housing needs of low-income residents and those with special needs. • In general, affordable housing developers need assistance in identification of sites and funding. • Easing development standards can also increase the feasibility of sites. • Creative thinking is needed from City staff in order to avoid common development constraints. • Housing Element policies and programs should prioritize the creation of extremely low-income (ELI) units and provide incentives for developers. • Homeless: There is a lack of emergency shelter and support services for Tri-Valley area homeless. o Specifically, there is a large need for shelter and housing programs for single men. o Supportive housing is also needed to transition homeless persons from transitional housing and emergency shelters. • Section 8: The demand for Section 8 housing has increased over the last few years. o There has been a decline in the number of properties accepting Section 8 Vouchers in the Tri-valley area. • Supportive Services: Increased availability and funding of supportive services that can aid with living expenses are needed. o There needs to be additional support from city staff to direct residents to services and coordinate with providers about program changes. Appendix A summarizes the agencies consulted, the services they provide, and housing needs identified. 22 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Public Meetings The City conducted public meetings before the Planning Commission and City Council to discuss housing needs and to review the Draft Housing Element: • February 25, 2014—Planning Commission • May 13, 2014— Planning Commission • June 17, 2014—City Council Comments received during these meetings are summarized in Appendix A. 3. Public Comments Received The City received a letter from the Building Industry Association (BIA) of Bay Area regarding Housing Element updates in the Bay Area. The letter is not specific to the City of Dublin. It contains a general overview of the Housing Element statutory provisions and requests specific areas of focus. The City's response to this letter is included in Appendix A. 23 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix A: Public Participation 1. Interviews with Service Providers Abode Services/Allied Housing 40849 Fremont Boulevard Fremont, CA 94538 Louis Chicoine, Executive Director Services Provided: The focus of Abode Services is on ending homelessness and to ensure that those in need are able to obtain and retain housing. They offer housing programs linked to support services for low-income and homeless families and individuals in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Each Abode program integrates these two components to help people establish permanent stability and return to independent lives. Housing options include emergency shelter, rental subsidies, transitional housing and permanent supportive housing. Support services include case management, primary and mental health care, substance recovery services, job counseling and placement, life skills classes, financial literacy training, practical tenancy training, parenting classes, and children's programs. Abode Services and Allied housing merged as an effort to consolidate their service capacity. As an affordable housing developer they specialize in developing small-scale housing developments that are affordable to families and households with special needs, such as persons with disabilities or households moving out of homelessness. Their housing development work also focuses on providing affordable housing that is linked with supportive services to assist low-income and special needs households to achieve and maintain housing stability and self-sufficiency. Population Served: A wide-range of vulnerable groups benefit from their services including children, emancipated foster youth, adults and transition-age youth living with severe mental illness, low-income families in vocational training, dually-diagnosed heads of households, single mothers, victims/survivors of domestic violence, seniors and people living with HIV/AIDS. Housing Needs: As one of the fastest growing services providers in the Bay Area, there has been a large increase in the demand for their services and programs. Over the last few years, within the Tri-Valley area, Abode Services has worked with the cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to run programs that provide rental assistance. They have not done any projects in the City of Dublin. Chicoine noted that its organization focuses on housing that may not be appropriate in suburban communities such as Dublin where costs and neighborhood acceptance may be barriers. He suggested that their Rapid Re-Housing program, which provides for quick housing placement within communities, has been an effective program that is easy for cities to use. Lastly, he suggested that Housing Elements need to prioritize the creation of extremely-low income units. Policies and programs which reward developers that create housing units and services for lower income households are needed. This can serve to incentivize and kick start the creation of the types of housing that lacks in the region. Appendix A-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Community Resources for Independent Living (CRIL) 3311 Pacific Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 Alejandra Hernandez, Employment Benefits Coordinator Services Provided: CRIL is a peer-based disability resource organization that advocates and provides resources for people with disabilities to improve lives and make communities fully accessible. CRIL is also a resource for disability awareness education and training, advocacy and technical advice. Among its many programs, CRIL's housing assistance services help people with disabilities and seniors with functional limitations with understanding the process in obtaining accessible, low income housing, primarily within Alameda County. CRIL keeps a current list of local rentals and reaches out to landlords to encourage renting to individuals with disabilities; however, they do not own housing or run their own residential facility. Their Livermore office offers Housing Workshops twice monthly where they share information on how to seek and apply for affordable and/or accessible housing in Alameda County, or in some cases outside of the County. Population Served: CRIL offers its services at no charge to persons with disabilities living in southern and eastern Alameda County. In order to become a CRIL consumer, an individual must have a disability or functional limitation and be able to benefit from independent living services. Everyone is welcome regardless of race, ethnicity, the nature of the disability or limitation, age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, immigration status, health condition or any other characteristics. Staff at the CRIL's Livermore office estimate 10 to 20 Dublin residents utilize their services a month. Housing Needs: Above all else, there is a high demand for more low-income affordable housing and housing for persons with specials needs in the Tri-Valley area. Demand for their housing assistance services, and affordable housing in general, has increased over the last few years. Most significantly, there has been an increase in the need for section 8 housing. However, there has been a decline in properties who participate in the program. This is a problem that they have noticed in Alameda County overall, but especially within the Tri-Valley area. CRIL has benefitted from the Season of Sharing's provision of one-time crisis-based assistance in coordination with their housing location services. This working relationship recently proved successful in assisting a client with funding to place a rental deposit and obtain housing. Further funding and support of these types of coordinated efforts would greatly aid the CRIL in assisting their clients. Eden I & R, Inc. 570 B. Street Hayward, CA 94541 Barbara Bernstein, Executive Director and Alison DeJung, Deputy Director Services Provided: Eden I&R's mission of "linking people and resources" and services offered are the result of collaborations that depend on the work of hundreds of community- based organizations. They offer a range of housing and service related programs, including: the AIDS Housing and Information Project (AHIP); Roving Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing; After-Hours Emergency Phone Services for Alameda County's Child and Adult Protective Services, Foster Care Placement Line, and the Public Guardians Office; Disaster Recovery Services; Housing Database; Social Services Database; Big Blue Book; and various seasonal programs. Over half of all calls they receive are related to housing, with callers needing assistance finding emergency shelter, transitional and supportive housing, Appendix A-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) mental health housing, and more permanent types of housing. Overall, the issues they deal with have a lot of components to them. Eden I&R also encounters callers with housing sustainability problems, including issues such as, utility assistance, rental assistance, transportation, tenant rights, employment, childcare. One of the keys to the success of their services is their approach in which staff gathers specific household information from callers with housing needs. This allows them to identify potential assistance opportunities that they may be able to utilize to reduce other living expenses, and can leave these households with more money for housing. They are the only agency in Alameda County to offer a comprehensive housing database listing of over 80,000 affordable housing units, including subsidized, low-income, and shared units. The housing database is effective through its two-pronged approach, giving those in need of housing access to a listing of affordable properties and connecting landlords/owners to potential tenants. The database offers free listing services to landlords/owners who qualify. In order to expand the listing, Eden I&R conducts outreach to landlords/owners through a lot of different ways, the most effective of which has simply been word of mouth. Their goal is to work with them to list their units as affordable through methods such as lowering their rates, renting out a room, or agreeing to accept Section 8 vouchers. Population Served: Since no other centralized source for health, housing, and human services information exists anywhere else in Alameda County, Eden I & R has become a critical resource for thousands of at-risk individuals, such as youth, non-English speakers, the economically disadvantaged, people living with HIV/AIDS, domestic violence survivors, the elderly, disabled, the homeless, and human service agencies seeking services or housing for their clients. Eden I&R serves over 100,000 Alameda County residents a year. Housing Needs: Countywide there are not enough affordable housing opportunities to meet the needs of their callers. The issue is only becoming more challenging as federal funding available in support of affordable housing continues to decrease. Although resources are not always available to directly connect callers to housing, Eden I & R's approach to connect callers with other resources to cut other living expensive often proves effective in increasing a caller's ability to pay for housing. However, they estimate that they miss approximately 19,000 calls a year due to a shortage in staff. Funding to expand their 2-1-1 special resource specialist staff would greatly impact their capability to link these missed callers with resources that can spare them money for housing. As one of the top service providers in the County for low-income individuals, Eden I & R would greatly benefit from additional support for its programs. In particular, additional assistance with expanding its housing database would be impactful. Mom-and-pop landlords can serve as one of the biggest resources to expanding affordable housing opportunities in the County. More importantly, these types of housing opportunities can serve as a way to distribute the stigma often associated with public or low-income housing. This can also lead to the integration of low-income residents into communities that may appear uninviting to them. They need additional support from housing department staff from cities throughout the County and Tri-Valley area to conduct outreach to these mom-and-pop landlords to list with Eden I & R. With increased efforts from city staff they estimate they could more than expand their housing database and thus expand access tp affordable housing opportunities. An increase in Eden I & R staff capacity for this program would also be beneficial and allow them conduct more of the outreach that is crucial to the expansion of their housing database. Appendix A-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) There is need for more people to become aware of the 2-1-1 services and other programs offered. They have benefited greatly from partnering with cities throughout the County, including the City of Dublin, and rely on city staff to refer residents to their services. Eden I & R can benefit from increased communication from staff of expected changes in services, programs, and affordable housing opportunities. Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley 2619 Broadway Oakland, CA 94612 David Pitson, Controller Services Provided: Habitat's overall focus is on developing affordable ownership housing through new construction, home renovation, and home repair. The program provides first time affordable homeownership opportunities for low and very low income families with children. In addition to working on their homes through the sweat equity or self-help program, families also attend workshops on budgeting, credit repairs, conflict resolution and home maintenance, repair and landscaping. Population Served: They primarily serve families who make 40 to 80 percent of the AMI. Sometimes they aid families who make 80 to 120 percent of the AMI, but never over 120 percent. Habitat aims to provide housing opportunities not for engineers or executives at large companies, but for the workforce who are janitors, teachers, and servers. Within the Tri-Valley area they are currently working mostly in the cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to purchase homes to rehabilitate. Housing Needs: Overall there is a huge need for affordable housing within the East Bay region, including the Tri-Valley. There are a lot of jobs being created in the Silicon Valley area, of which Dublin is on the periphery, but the housing opportunities to match this growth are not being developed at the same pace. Habitat has worked with the City of Dublin in the past, but land in the City is very expensive and hard to develop. Cities often employ a philosophy that they must utilize government funding for affordable rental housing development in order to maximize the number of units. However, the ownership housing model that Habitat uses is also effective in producing large number of units for those most in need. Habitat is interested in working with the City of Dublin in the future and is also open to partnering with market-rate developers to create affordable housing components of future developments. Satellite Affordable Housing Associates (SAHA) 1521 University Avenue Berkeley, CA 94703 Eve Stewart, Director of Housing Development Services Provided: SAHA develops and manages affordable, service-enriched housing that promotes healthy and dignified living for people with limited options. Residents at nearly every SAHA community have access to a wide variety of supportive services, activities, and civic engagement programs. Resident services offered at their communities that house elderly individuals are especially helpful in providing for residents to live as independently as possible. Population Served: The population served is low income families, seniors and special needs (disabled and developmentally disabled). All have incomes of 60 percent or below Appendix A-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) AMI, with the average income being 30 to 50 percent AMI. They are able to aid those who fall below 30 percent in circumstances where they are additional subsidy assistance is available. Within the last few years they've started developing housing for people who are currently homeless, instead of only focusing on those who are at-risk. They serve a wide geographic area, including properties in Sacramento, but are currently most active within their core area of focus in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. Within the Tri-Valley area they completed a project in Livermore a couple of years ago, but have not done any projects in Dublin, nor in neighboring Pleasanton. Housing Needs: There is a large need to make housing that is accessible for populations of all incomes and those with special needs. There are no specific reasons SAHA has not worked with the City of Dublin; however, Eve noted that some of the more suburban locations can prove more difficult for them to develop in. They often encounter issues with site zoning. Of the projects they've most recently completed, the lowest density they successfully developed at allowed about 25 units per acre. Zoning that accommodates 25 units per acre is a minimum for their developments, but 30 units per acre would be preferred. Finding appropriate sites can also be a problem, as most of their projects require about two acres of land. Local funding is an essential component of their developments, especially when tax credits are involved. City staff need to be able to think creatively about development standards (e.g. setbacks, easements and parking)that constrain development, in order to make a project happen. In general, working with cities that have high response and turn-around standards, and good city council and planning commission leadership can make all the difference for the success of a project. Tri-Valley Haven 3663 Pacific Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 Ann King, Executive Director Services Provided: Provides shelter and counseling for survivors of sexual assault, battered women and their children in the Tri-Valley area. They operate the County's only 24- hour rape crisis center and have homeless services and shelters. With 30 beds, Tri-Valley Haven's Shiloh Domestic Violence Shelter houses and supports women and their children who are victims of domestic violence. The Haven's 16-bed Sojourner House, located in the City of Livermore, provides temporary shelter for homeless families in a safe, supportive environment. With separate bedrooms for family units, a stocked kitchen, three full baths, and laundry facilities, Sojourner House is the only homeless shelter in the Tri-Valley Area that accepts two-parent families, single fathers with children, and families with teenage boys. Supportive services, including counseling, housing assistance, long-term support, legal clinic, employment assistance, seasonal provisions, and educational support are offered through its shelters and other programs. Tri-Valley Haven also operates a food pantry based in Livermore that serves over 4,000 low-income Tri-Valley residents a month. The food pantry program offers mobile services at two additional locations in the City of Pleasanton. Population Served: Their programs serve Tri-Valley residents from cross all income groups, who are adults and children who have experienced domestic violence, sexual assault, or homelessness. Most of their clients are usually very low income. They also operate the only homeless shelter in the Tri-Valley Area that accepts single fathers accompanied by their children, and boys over the age of 10. Appendix A-5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Needs: Low-income affordable housing is a significantly pressing need for the Tri- Valley area. They struggle to graduate people from their shelter programs into more permanent housing due to the lack of availability in the area. There is also a large need for shelter and housing programs for single men. Homelessness in the Tri-Valley area has worsened over the last few years, to the extent that King described it as almost becoming a part of common life and accepted by the community. Many Tri-Valley residents become homeless due to the unstable housing market, and other issues such as medical bankruptcy and drug/alcohol reliance. Homelessness mostly goes unseen in the area but this may change. The Tri-Valley area has the opportunity and needs to respond now to prevent homelessness from becoming an issue that is seen everywhere within its local communities. There is a general lack of support for homeless programs and services at the federal level. The expectation has been for churches and non-profit organizations to pick up the slack with no funding support. Available funding is nowhere near the level needed to match current demand in the area. Current activities undertaken by Tri-Valley Haven include attempting to coordinate with both the Cities of Livermore and Pleasanton to convert the Livermore emergency shelter for families into a shelter for single men, and to open a new family shelter in Pleasanton. Past support provided by the City of Dublin has been very helpful, including the City's assistance with efforts made to renovate the Haven's facilities. They're looking into opening a one-stop shop day center for Tri-Valley area homeless that will provide comprehensive shelter and supportive services. The City of Dublin can aid the Haven's efforts through providing capital funding for the project early on, and by also helping to achieve the political will in the Tri-Valley area necessary to make such a project happen. Tri-Valley Reach P.O. Box 5564 Pleasanton, CA 94566 Judy Butterly, Co-Chair Services Provided: Their mission is to provide resources, education, activities, community participation and housing opportunities that will enable adults with developmental challenges to live full and independent lives. Their housing assistance program offers eligible clients the opportunity to live independently. Currently they own a total of nine properties in Livermore and Pleasanton—ranging from duplexes to condo's to single family residences. They modify their homes to suit each residents' special needs and work in close collaboration with the Regional Center of the East Bay to provide supportive services. Population Served: Currently, their homes support 21 tenants in Livermore and Pleasanton. To be eligible for residency, tenants must be a client of the Regional Center and either live in the Tri-Valley area or have family members who live in the Tri-Valley. Given that all of the properties they currently own are in Livermore and Pleasanton, the majority of their clients are from these areas. They serve adults of any age, with most tenants ranging in age from 30 to 60 years old. Judy noted that adults with special needs who are younger than 30 tend to live at home with their families for as long as possible. Housing Needs: Demand for their services has been fairly stable over the last few years. They have a small waitlist, but quite often when vacancies do become available the potential tenants are not fully prepared or ready to live independently. Potential expansion of their housing placement program would be dependent on an increase in demand for their housing, of which they currently are not experiencing. Butterly added that this lack in demand for housing is not representative of other independent living programs in the area, Appendix A-6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) such as group homes, which may be experiencing an increase in housing needs. With staff knowledge and experience, they have the capabilities to be able to effectively respond to future increases in demand for their housing. They do not own properties in the City of Dublin as there has not been demand for their housing in the area. For this reason they have not recently pursued housing in the Dublin as an option, but they are aware that the City would be welcoming to such possibilities in the future. 2. Housing Element Outreach List Standard Pacific Homes Dublin Land Company Attn: Doug Batson Attn: John DiManto 3825 Hopyard Road, Suite 195 1210 Coleman Avenue Pleasanton, CA 94588 Santa Clara, CA 95050 Charter Properties Alameda County SPA Attn: Jim Tong Attn: Stuart Cook 4080 Grafton Street, Suite 200 224 W. Winton Avenue, Room 110 Dublin, CA 94568 Hayward, CA 94544 Braddock& Logan Kaiway Investments 10 Attn: Jeff Lawrence c/o Mr. Michael Tseng 4155 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, #201 1499 Bayshore, #132 Danville, CA 94506 Burlingame, CA 94010 Avalon Bay Communities, Inc. Milton & Gloria Righetti et al Attn: Jeff White 3088 Massachusetts Avenue 400 Race Street, Suite 200 Castro Valley, CA 94546-2964 San Jose, CA 95123 Anderson Second Family LP Blake Hunt Ventures P.O. Box 910371 Attn: Jerry Hunt St. George, LIT 84791-0371 500 La Gonda Way, Suite 295 Danville, CA 94526 Collier Canyon Properties c/o Bob Branaugh D.R. HORTON 19077 Madison Avenue Attn: Dean Mills Castro Valley, CA 94546 5050 Hopyard Road, #180 Pleasanton, CA 94588 Pat Croak 4617 James Avenue Toll Brothers Castro Valley, CA 94546 2000 Crow Canyon Place, Suite 200 San Ramon, CA 94583 Jordan Charitable Trust c/o Tony Varni Discovery Homes Varni, Fraiser, Hartwell & Rodgers Attn: Albert Seeno III 650 "A" Street 4061 Port Chicago Highway, #H Hayward, CA 94543 Concord, CA 94520 Appendix A-7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Monte Vista Entitlement, Inc. Mission Valley Homes c/o T. W. Starkweather Attn: Kevin Fryer 1501 N. Broadway, #320 5000 Hopyard Road, #170 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 Pleasanton, CA 94588 Robert& Shirley Branaugh Essex Property Trust, Inc. 900 E. Stanley Blvd., Unit 290 Attn: Josh Corzine Livermore CA 94550-4097 925 E. Meadow Drive Tracy, CA 94303 Martin W. Inderbitzen Attorney at Law EBJ Partners, LP P.O. Box 1537 112 Washington Avenue, #250 Pleasanton, CA 94566 Richmond, CA 94801-3990 Prologis, Inc. Argent Management Attn: Mark Hansen, Sr. VP Attn: Joe Guerra Pier 1, Bay 1 97 S. 2nd Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, CA 94111 San Jose, CA 95113 SCS Development Company Mr. Robert Chen Attn: Mike Sullivan 160 Tobin Clark Drive 404 Saratoga Avenue, #100 Hillsborough, CA 94010-7444 Santa Clara, CA 95050 BJP ROF Jordan Ranch LLC KB HOME Nor. California/Bay Area 5000 Hopyard Road, #170 Attn: Ray Panek, Sr. VP Pleasanton, CA 94588-3349 5000 Executive Parkway, Suite 125 San Ramon, CA 94583 Dublin Corporate Center LLC 400 S. Hope Street, #200 Righetti Partners Los Angeles, CA 90071-2805 c/o Milt Righetti 1900 Embarcadero, #301 Thomas A& Lelene Fredrich Oakland, CA 94606 6960 Tassajara Road Dublin, CA 94568 Kaiser Foundation Hospitals 1950 Franklin, #6 Jose and Violeta Vargas Oakland, CA 94612-5103 7020 Tassajara Road Dublin, CA 94568 Regent Properties Attn: Pat Costanza Apostolic Church of Fremont 3526 Villero Court 14850 Highway 4, Box 268A Pleasanton, CA 94566 Discovery Bay, CA 94505 Eden Housing, Inc. Carolyn Adams Attn: Faye Blackman 5374 Tassajara Road 22645 Grand Street Dublin, CA 94568 Hayward, CA 94541 Valley Christian Center Attn: Real Estate Dept. 7500 Inspiration Circle Dublin, CA 94568 Appendix A-8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Pacific Union Holdings, Inc. Gary S. Vandeweghe, Esq. Attn: Bruce Myers 96 No. Third Street, Suite 500 675 Hartz Avenue, #300 San Jose, CA 95112 Danville, CA 94526 Brookfield Homes Alameda Cty Surplus Prop. Authority Attn: Kevin Poulson Attn: Stuart Cook 500 La Gonda Way, Suite 100 224 W. Winton Avenue, Room 110 Danville, CA 94526 Hayward, CA 94544 K Hovnanian Homes SummerHill Homes Attn: Scott Montgomery Attn: Wendi Baker 1375 Exposition Blvd., #300 3000 Executive Parkway Sacramento, CA 95815 San Ramon, CA 94583 Harry Crosby Kingsmill Group 834 Fifth Avenue, #1 C Attn: Marshall Torre New York, NY 10065 P.O. Box 2445 San Ramon, CA 94583 Westgate Ventures Attn: Jon Revells Phil Kerr 2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd, Suite 224 City Ventures San Ramon, CA 94583 444 Spear Street, Suite 105 San Francisco, CA 94105 Trumark Homes Attn: Chris Davenport Tony Bowskowski 4185 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, Suite 200 City Ventures Danville, CA 94506 444 Spear Street, Suite 105 San Francisco, CA 94105 TAYLOR MORRISON 81 Blue Ravine Road, #220 Kingsmill Group Folsom, CA 95630 Attn: Keith Fichtner 4900 Hopyard Road, Suite 100 Pleasanton, CA 94588 MacKay& Somps Attn: Mark McClellan 5142 Franklin Drive, Suite B Pleasanton, CA 94588 Westgate Ventures Attn: Adam Tennant 2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd, Suite 224 San Ramon, CA 94583 K Hovnanian Homes Attn: Carrie Gooding 1375 Exposition Blvd., #300 Sacramento, CA 95815 Appendix A-9 M O - OD N r- N r O O N ti O 00 It N (D N qt CL O O O (h 0) - It U') 00 O qt LO) 't � lqt r- O LO O O (0 LO) LL) (0 Lo (0 � Lo Lo (0 (0 LL) U) LO) 0 Ln (0 ('7 Lo r r Nv It It It v vet It qt v � 't Iq v 't It v rn 0) rn 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) rn 0) 0) 0) 0) 0) rn rn 0) 0) 0) rn m N U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U c a) o m a) 0 0 � y cam } ° o c 0 -v o � o � v ° 0 0 0 c c c m m c c m m m e V Y Y E E �° aYi m E m m m E m Q E c LI) Mn c Y - Y (D Y �C a) C Y 0 a) C C O m m 0 m m 2 m m > a) m m m > m m a) m m m > m m m O Q LL O U O 2 J a- O O = :L 2 (0 J 2 O � J (n LL (n LL O OO LL O LL(O C> p 0 O r- O t N r- M co co 7 O 7 7 7 O 7 '7 :3 (0 LL U) fn U) Q' N (n (n 07 U) U) a) 7 d a) > a) aL m mQ m O Q(D (D a) y 0) Q > O c E m m a) ` Q Q v o °o _ a) c m Y m +L- D o c 0 U Co co m 0 U co Y c E m w IT m ` m m 2 N Dw Q � LL OIL Q a � li (orn QdLA v � muj3 o g d It N O > 0000 0) 0) C) 0 N 00 O (D OOD d I 0 0) m O O LO O O O O co O r- M M O C) m (7 � M N m N 4 LO) > O r- (0 Q' N U ti � N CO h N a. 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Public Meetings February 25, 2014- Planning Commission Meeting No public comments were received. May 13, 2014- Planning Commission Meeting No public comments were received. June 17, 2014- City Council Meeting One resident addressed the City Council and spoke about the consequences of not having a certified Housing Element. 4. Public Comments Received The BIA letter is attached on the following pages, along with the City's response. Appendix A-14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) AREA November 26,2013 i Housing/Planning Director Jurisdiction Via email th Flay Planning Coalition Re:Housing Element Update The undersigned members of the Bay Area Business Coalition advocate for a vibrant regional economy and outstanding quality of life for existing and future residents of the San Francisco Bay B A y A R f A Area. A necessary—though by no means sufficient—condition to achieve these goals is for the region to provide an adequate supply of housing within the region. State housing element law generally—and the governmental constraints component in particular—can be important tools to advance these goals. With a Bay Area cities and counties currently updating their housing elements,our organizations respectfully request that your t= A + jurisdiction consider and address the following comments as part "o of the public review process. "s+o�ita� We recognize that the housing element process can be resource intensive and sometimes difficult. We hope that by identifying certain priority Issues and questions,this letter will assist in focusing resources on policies and practices that are of significant and recurring interest to the regulated community. We also would support incorporating these standardized issues into the framework for local jurisdictions to be able to take advantage of the housing element certification streamlining developed by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). Iyy I.Overview of the statutory provisions. The California Department of Housing and Community Jobs and Housing Coalition Development(HCD)has prepared formal guidance interpreting the constraints analysis portion of housing element law (http://www.hcd.ca.lov/had/housing element2/CON home.php. NORTH BAY HCD's overview of the requirements and their purpose provides: LEADERSHIP The element must identify and analyze potential and actual COUNCIL governmental constraints to the maintenance,improvement,or development of housing for all income levels,including housing for persons with disabilities. The analysis should identify the specific standards and processes and evaluate their Impact,Including SAMCEDA cumulatively,on the supply and affordability of housing.The s, C ft G__* analysis should determine whether local regulatory standards pose an actual constraint and must also demonstrate local efforts Appendix A-15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) to remove constraints that hinder a jurisdiction from meeting its housing needs.... The analysis of potential governmental constraints should describe past or current efforts to remove governmental constraints. Where the analyses identifies that constraints exist the element should include program responses to mitigate the effects of the constraint.Each analysis should use specific objective data,quantified where possible.A determination should be mode for each potential constraint as to whether it poses as an actual constraint. The analysis should identify the specific standards and processes and evaluate their Impact Including cumulatively,on the supply and affordability of housing. II.Requested specific areas of focus We have identified certain policies that generally represent significant potential constraints in the Bay Area and we request that as you conduct the constraints portion of your housing element review,these issues in particular be addressed: • Did your iurisdiction commit to addressing specific constraints as a condition of HCD certification of the existing housing element? If so,what was the constraint and what has been done to address it? • Does your iurisdiction have a mandatory Inclusionary zoning policy? if so,has an analysis been done that measures the economic impact? Does it contain meaningful and regularly available incentives,and is its implementation flexible so that there are alternatives to a"like for like must build requirement"such as payment of reasonable in lieu fees,land dedication,or acquisition and rehabilitation of existing units with provision affordability covenants? Are such alternatives available at the developer's option or with staff approval— but without need for Council or Board approval on a project-by-project basis? • Has your furisdiction adopted a density bonus ordinance consistent with governing state law fGov't Code Section 659151? Does the density bonus ordinance count mandatory inclusionary zoning units toward the density bonus threshold as required by the recent court of appeal decision in Latinos Unidos del Valle de Napo y Solana v.County of Napa,217 Cal.App. 4th 1160(2013)? • What Is the cumulative fee and exaction burden on new housing In your furlsdictlon? This analysis should include not only development fees that are"formally"reflected in published fee schedules,but also include exactions imposed via housing allocation program/ "beauty contests,"community benefits/amenities agreements,CFD annexation requirements, and the like. The analysis should also include fees imposed by other agencies,for example school fees,sewer and water fees,and fees imposed pursuant to an applicable regional Habitat Conservation Plan. The analysis should determine the%of the sales of price of new housing in the jurisdiction is represented by the cumulative fee/exaction burden,as well as the%of costs for rental housing units represented by the cumulative fee/exaction burden. • Does your iurisdiction have any recently adopted,proposed.or under consideration new or increased fee or exaction,such as an affordable housine impact fee? • Has Your furisdiction required new housing protects,Including multifamily/attached protects,to pay a fee or special tax for ongoing general governmental services? Appendix A-16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Does your iurisdiction have a designated Priority Development Area(PDA)? Is it a "planned"or"Potential"PDA? Have the number of residential units and densities shown in the PDA application been incorporated into the General Plan? Has the CEQA process been completed for the PDA so that no additional CECiA review is necessary for a proposed project consistent with the PDA? Have development restrictions and processes been streamlined in the area covered by the PDA? • What were the sites relied on for the adequate sites compliance of the existing housing element? What has been the entitlement/development activity for these sites during the prior planning period? Were any of the sites subject to"by right"development procedures? • Does your iurisdiction have any type of cap or limitation on the number or type of housing units that may be permitted or constructed iurisdiction wide or in specific areas of the jurisdiction—induding a cap or limitation tied to a specified level of new lob creation in the iurlsdiction? • Has your iurisdiction provided for"by right"housing development in any areas? • Are there zoning or other development restrictions(such as voter approval requirements,density limits or building height restrictions)that have impeded Infill and/or transit oriented development? • Has your iurisdiction consistently demonstrated compliance with both the letter and spirit of the Permit Streamlining Act? • What are your jurisdiction's historic preservation policies and review procedures and have they had a significant impact on the permit and entitlement processes for new development Prolects? • Has your jurisdiction adopted an ordinance pursuant to the Quimby Act that gives developers credit for private open space? • In implementing the Quimby Act does your iurisdiction provide for consistency between the calculation of the existing neighborhood and community park inventory,and the criteria and procedures for determining whether to accept land offered for parkland dedication or to give credit for private open space? For example,has your jurisdiction refused to accept an area in whole or in partial satisfaction of the parkland dedication ordinance on the basis that it is unsuitable for park and recreational uses even though the area is substantially similar to areas included in the overall parkland inventory used to calculate the parkland dedication requirement and fee? • In the project review process,has your Jurisdiction required developers to use the Bay Area Air Quality Management District's CEQA Thresholds of Significance for Toxic Air Contaminants(TAC Receptor Thresholds)? Has your jurisdiction explored alternative procedures for addressing project siting and air quality concerns,such as in the general plan or zoning code? Appendix A-17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Has your f urisdiction adopted a Climate Adaptation Plan that is more stringent with respect to the Per capita GHG reductions for the land use sectorhransportation sector than the eauivalent per capita tarmU established for the region by GARB pursuant to SB 375? Our organizations intend to monitor housing element updates throughout the region,and we respectfully request that your jurisdiction formally respond to these questions early in the update process. We also ask that you send a paper or electronic copy of the responses to: BIA of the Bay Area Attn: Paul Campos 101 Ygnacio Valley Road,Suite 210 Walnut Creek,CA 94596 pca moos gDb iaba ya r ea.orrt 415-223-3775 Yours very truly, John Coleman Paul Campos Tom Terrill May Planning Coalition BIA Bey Area fast Ray Ieadership Council Gregory McConnell Cynthia Murray Rosanne Foust Jobs&Housing Coalition North Bay Leadership Council SAMCEDA Jim Wunderman Joshua Howard Bay Area Council California Apartment Association Appendix A-18 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Paul Campos BIA of the Bay Area 101 Ygnacio Valley Road,Suite 210 CITY OF Walnut Creek,CA 94596 DUBLIN Subject:Letter Regarding Housing Element Update,Dated November 26,2013 100 Civic Plaza Dear Mr.Campos: Dublin,California 94568 Phone(925)833-6650 The City of Dublin is in receipt of BIA's letter sent to all jurisdictions in the ABAG Fax.(925)833-6651 region regarding the fifth cycle Housing Element Update. The letter is not specific to the City of Dublin,but offers suggestions to Bay Area jurisdictions when updating their Housing Elements. The City's previous Housing Element was certified by the State Department of Housing and Community Development(HCD)for compliance with State law. The 2015.2023 Housing Element is a technical update given no significant changes to State law have occurred. In the 2015-2023 Housing Element,the City reviewed its development policies and regulations,including density bonus,inclusionary housing policy,planning and development fees,and parks and open space requirements. The City also recently amended its Downtown Dublin Specific Plan to provide an increased potential for residential and mixed use development in the area. This amendment ensures the City with adequate sites to accommodate its Regional Housing Needs Allocation(RHNA). With the Specific Plan Amendment,the City is able to facilitate development in the area in a streamlined manner. The City of Dublin has been diligently monitoring its RHNA and sites obligations. The new Ch couricil Housing Element includes a program to continue this practice. (925)833.6650 CityMa°agar (925)813-6650 The Draft Housing Element Update has already been sent to the State HCD for Camnruney Development review. Staff has been working diligently with HCD to address their comments and forma 8le My 0 fully expects"certification"from HCD. Econank Dwebpmem (925)8336650 fliamce/Adman Services Based on our past development trend,except when impacted by the regional and (925)833.6640 Film Prwerrden statewide recession,the City has been successful in expanding its housing stock, (92S)633-66% including affordable housing. With the current economic recovery,the City expects Numan 3oa (9251 833605 residential development activities to continue,aiding in the City's implementation Parke&Communky Servkn of its Housing Plan over the next eight years. (925)5564500 Police (925)833.6670 Sincerely, Public Wens/bVimaering (92$1833-6630 l Luke Sims,AICP Community Development Director Dublin CC: Chris Foss,City Manager Linda Smith,Assistant City Manager Jeff Baker,Assistant Community Development Director 2011 Marnie R.Delgado,Senior Planner www.dublinca gov Appendix A-19 >..�= a) a) C_ U)C C w a)"° w C m 3 -O'O w .- i U) C d..> L L •c O N N L_ a C O L ` Y m U H O >' d nO'N N O°Ld p U > - a0 E sc U a >> � _ L N m 000 v N a) E >O - i U o > E O E E c co (D M o .m. a) C a) L m w L a) L 0)-r- C: > >.� O,fA p U " m o cw °rnm t ULU -W cr r -c c '> L a) ¢ O. 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E § ° b § J $ ° I ® Co (D:3 ■ E Li�a E & 2 § ; � f § % � � aCL� ; R® � �'a g .2-0 Cc ; § 2222 ( @ § BR2c \k 22Mcc ° ° = E ££ > «a E e ` -2§\ 2 � 8b- CL o - � a City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix C: Technical Background Report 1. Housing Needs Assessment The Housing Needs Assessment begins with a brief history of Dublin, which is intended to provide community context and a foundation for the analysis of demographic and housing stock characteristics as well as various constraints to the provision of housing during the 2015-2023 Housing Element Cycle. The needs assessment identifies special housing needs among certain population groups, evaluates housing conditions, and provides other important information to support the goals, policies, and programs of the Housing Element to meet the needs of current and future Dublin residents. Brief History of Dublin Dublin has long been known as the "crossroads" of the Bay Area.' The City now sits at the crossroads of two major highways: Interstate 580 and Interstate-680. However, the significance of the "crossroads" dates back almost two hundred years when Dublin was the junction of two important stage routes - one from the Bay Area to Stockton and the other from Martinez to San Jose. The Alamilla Spring, located in the Dublin area, provided a place for travelers to change horses and freshen up before continuing their journey. Development of the Dublin area began in approximately 1822. Jose Maria Amador had been paid in land for his years of service as a Mexican soldier and as administrator of Mission San Jose. He received a land grant of 16,517 acres in the Amador- Livermore Valley and built several adobe homes and many small buildings used as shops. In 1852 Michael Murray and Jeremiah Fallon came to the area from Ireland and purchased 1,000 acres from Jose Amador. Shortly thereafter, the area began to grow; Alameda County was created from parts of Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties in 1853. Both Murray and Fallon served on the Alameda County Board of Supervisors. Townships were established the next year and Murray's name was chosen for the Dublin area. By 1877 the first schoolhouse in the Amador-Livermore Valley, along with a church, two hotels, Green's Store, a wagon and blacksmith shop, and a shoemaker's shop were constructed in Dublin. Mail was delivered to the Dougherty Station Hotel; thus, the area became known as Dougherty's Station. Dougherty Station grew slowly during the first half of the 20th Century with the first housing tracts built in the Dublin area in 1960, transforming the formerly rural community into a suburb. Dublin grew steadily from the early 1960s as both a residential and retail center and incorporated in 1982. ' Much of the historical information is derived from Virginia Bennett's book, "Dublin Reflections and Bits of Valley History'(1991). Copies of this book and other historical information can be found at the Dublin Library. Appendix C-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) A. Population Characteristics and Trends The following section describes and analyzes the various population characteristics and trends in Dublin that affect housing needs. Population Growth Dublin's population has grown steadily and dramatically over the past two decades. The number of residents in the City increased 29 percent between 1990 and 2000 (Table C-1) and grew by another 54 percent between 2000 and 2010. This growth has far outpaced the County's growth rate and that of most nearby jurisdictions. The Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) projects continued population growth in Dublin and surrounding communities through 2020. Most of the projected population growth in Alameda County is expected to occur through annexation and development of city spheres of influence and areas around unincorporated communities such as Castro Valley. Table C-1: Population Growth Po ulation %Change Jurisdiction 1990 2000 2010 2020 1990- 2000- 2010- 2000 2010 2020 Castro Valley 48,619 57,292 61,388 N/A 18% 7% N/A Dublin 23,229 29,973 46,036 54,200 29% 54% 18% Livermore 56,741 73,345 80,968 88,000 29% 10% 9% Pleasanton 50,553 63,654 70,285 76,800 16% 10% 9% San Ramon 35,303 44,722 72,148 76,800 27% 61% 6% Alameda 1,279,182 1,443,741 1,510,271 1,654,200 13% 5% 10% County I T i Source:Census, 1990,2000,&2010; Association of Bay Area Governments(ABAG)—Projections,2013. Note:ABAG data not available for the unincorporated community of Castro Valley. Age Composition A population's age characteristics are also an important factor in evaluating housing and community development needs and determining the direction of future housing development. Typically, distinct lifestyles, family types and sizes, incomes, and housing preferences accompany different age groups. As people move through each stage of life, housing needs and preferences change. For example, young householders without children usually have different housing preferences than middle-age householders with children or senior householders living alone. Dublin's population is, as measured by the median age of its residents, slightly younger than most neighboring communities and the County as a whole. In 2010, Dublin's median age was 35.3 years, while the County's median age was 36.6. The City's proportion of young residents (22 percent) and seniors (seven percent) has remained fairly stable since 2000 and was the lowest among its neighbors in 2010, suggesting that a significant proportion of Dublin's population is of workforce age (Table C-2). Appendix C-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-2: Age Characteristics Jurisdiction Under 18 years Over 65 years Median Age 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 2010 Castro Valley 22% 24% 23% 15% 15% 13% 41.2 Dublin 23% 21% 22% 3% 5% 7% 35.3 Livermore 27% 28% 26% 7% 8% 10% 38.3 Pleasanton 26% 28% 27% 5% 8% 11% 40.5 San Ramon 27% 26% 30% 4% 6% 8% 37.1 Alameda County 24% 25% 23% 11% 10% 11% 36.6 Source: Census, 1990, 2000, &2010. The most noticeable shift in the City's age distribution was among working age residents (Figure C-1). Dublin's workforce is beginning to age. Since 1990, the proportion of 25 to 44 year olds dropped by eight percentage points, while the proportion of 45 to 64 year olds increased by eight percentage points. This could be an indication of the City's residents aging in place. Should this trend continue, Dublin's senior population could see a significant increase in the coming years. Figure C-1: Age Distribution, 1990-2010 50% 45% - 40% 35% - 30% -- 25% — --- 20% - 15% 10% — 5% — — Under 5 5 to 17 18 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 65& Up 1990 7% 15% 12% 46% 16% 3% _— ■2000 6% 21% 3% 44% 21% 5% ■2010 7% 15% 8% 38% 24% 7% - Source: Census, 1990,2000,&2010. Appendix C-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Race and Ethnicity Household characteristics, income levels, and cultural backgrounds tend to vary by race and ethnicity, often affecting housing needs and preferences. Studies have suggested that different racial and ethnic groups also differ in their attitudes toward and/or tolerance for "housing problems" as defined by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), including overcrowding and housing cost burden.2 According to these studies, perceptions regarding housing density and overcrowding tend to vary between racial and ethnic groups. Especially within cultures that prefer to live with extended family members, household size and overcrowding also tend to increase. In general, Hispanic and Asian households exhibit a greater propensity than the White households for living in extended families. Since 1990, the City's population has grown significantly more diverse. Dublin's White population, which made up the majority of the City's residents in 1990, has decreased by 28 percent, while the Asian population has increased by 21 percent. As of 2010, approximately 44 percent of Dublin residents were White/Caucasian, 27 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 15 percent Hispanic/Latino, nine percent Black/African-American, and five percent were identified as belonging to two or more or other races (Figure C-2). The 2000 Census allowed respondents to classify themselves as belonging to "Two or More" races for the first time. This change in methodology may explain most of the increase between 1990 and 2000 among residents who classified themselves as belonging to "Other" races. Figure C-2: Race and Ethnicity, 1990-2010 80% 70% - 60% - 50 40% - 30% - 20% - 10% — 0% White/ Hispanic/ Black/African Asian/Pacific Other Caucasion Latino American Islander 1990 72% 10% 11% 6% 1% ■2000 62% 14% 10% 10% 4% ■2010 44% 15% 9% 27% 5% Source: Census, 1990, 2000, &2010. 2 Studies include the following: "The Determinants of Household Overcrowding and the Role of Immigration in Southern California" by S.Y. Choi (1993); "The Changing Problem of Overcrowding" by D. Myers, William Baer, and S.Y. Choi (1996); and "Immigration Cohorts and Residential Overcrowding in Southern California" by D. Myers and S.W. Lee(1996). Appendix C-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Dublin's population is more diverse compared to most nearby jurisdictions, with the exception of San Ramon, but not as diverse as Alameda County overall (Table C-3). Table C-3: Race/Ethnicity 2010 White/ Hispanic/ Black/ Asian/ Jurisdiction Caucasian Latino African Pacific Other American Islander Castro Valley 50% 17% 7% 22% 5% Dublin 44% 15% 9% 27% 5% Livermore 65% 21% 2% 9% 4% Pleasanton 61% 10% 2% 23% 4% San Ramon 49% 9% 3% 36% 5% Alameda County 34% 23% 12% 27% 1 5% Source: Census, 2010. B. Employment Profile An assessment of community needs must consider the occupational profile of City residents. Incomes associated with different jobs and the number of workers in a household determines the type and size of housing a household can afford. In some cases, the types of jobs held by residents can affect housing needs and demand (such as in communities with military installations, college campuses, and seasonal agriculture). Occupation and Labor Participation The American Community Survey (ACS) provides information about employment in the City. As of 2011, Management, Business, Science, and Arts and Sales and Office occupations were the two largest occupational categories in Dublin (Table C-4). These categories accounted for 79 percent of the jobs held by the City's residents. By comparison, these occupations comprised approximately 68 percent of the jobs held by Alameda County residents. Table C-4: Employment Profile Occupations of Residents Dublin Alameda County Management, Business, Science, and Arts 10,935 51% 320,025 45% Service 2,444 11% 110,213 15% Sales and Office 6,050 28% 166,801 23% Natural Resources, Construction, and Maintenance 1,002 5% 52,037 7% Production, Transportation, and Material Moving 1,088 5% 68,959 10% Source:American Community Survey(ACS),2007-2011. Employment growth typically leads to strong housing demand, while the reverse is true when employment contracts. The City adopted a Commercial Linkage Fee in 2005. The Commercial Linkage Fee is collected and deposited into the Inclusionary Zoning In-lieu Fee fund for the funding of affordable housing programs. As of April 1, 2014, the In-Lieu Fee fund has a balance of $7,013,816. The City will continue to implement its Commercial Linkage Fee program as a means of generating revenue to increase the supply of affordable housing in Dublin. Appendix C-5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Income by Occupation Management occupations were the highest paid occupations in the Alameda County region in the first quarter of 2013, while food preparation, service-related, and sales occupations were among the lowest paid occupations (Table C-5). In 2011, a larger proportion of Dublin residents were employed in higher paying occupations compared to the employed residents of Alameda County as a whole. This pattern would explain the City's higher median income (see Figure C-4 later). Table C-5: Average Salary by Occupation, Alameda County (Part of Oakland- Fremont-Hayward MD)-2013 Occupations Average Salary Management $128,829 Legal $114,903 Healthcare Practitioners and Technical $104,128 Architecture and Engineering $98,276 Computer and Mathematical $96,170 Life, Physical and Social Science $82,507 Business and Financial Operations $82,609 Construction and Extraction $62,371 Education, Training and Library $61,125 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports and Media $59,691 All Occupations $59,886 Protective Services $58,723 Community and Social Service $56,123 Installation, Maintenance and Repair $54,576 Sales and Related $45,801 Office and Administrative Support $43,231 Production $40,896 Transportation and Material Moving $40,687 Healthcare Support $37,118 Buildings and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance $33,095 Personal Care and Service $28,138 Farming, Fishing and Forestry $26,854 Food Preparation and Serving Related $22,940 Source: State Employment Development Department, 2013. Appendix C-6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) C. Household Characteristics The Census defines a household as all persons who occupy a housing unit. This definition includes single persons living alone, families related through marriage or blood, and unrelated individuals living together. Persons living in retirement or convalescent homes, dormitories, or other group living situations are not considered households. Information on household characteristics is important to understand the growth and changing needs of a community. Household Type According to the Census, Dublin was home to 14,913 households in 2010. Of these households, 28 percent were single-person households and 11 percent were headed by seniors (Table C-6). Dublin's household characteristics were in many ways similar to characteristics of households in nearby jurisdictions. However, the City does have the lowest proportion of senior-headed households in the region. Table C-6: Household Characteristics Single- Senior- Families Single- Large Jurisdiction Person Headed with Parent Households Households Households Children Households Castro Valley 28% 22% 33% 9% 11% Dublin 21% 11% 37% 7% 10% Livermore 21% 18% 36% 8% 12% Pleasanton 19% 18% 41% 36% 10% San Ramon 19% 12% 46% 6% 11% Alameda County 26% 18% 31% 9% 13% Source: Census, 2010. Different household types generally have different housing needs. Seniors or young adults often comprise the majority of the single-person households and tend to reside in apartment units, condominiums, or smaller single-family homes. Families often prefer larger single-family homes. Dublin's housing stock provides a range of unit types to meet the needs of all of its residents. Roughly, 54 percent of the City's housing stock is comprised of detached single- family units and approximately 33 percent are multi-family units, which include apartments and condominiums. Household Size Household size identifies sources of population growth and household overcrowding. A community's average household size will increase over time if there is a trend towards larger families. In communities where the population is aging, the average household size may decline. Dublin's average household size in 2010 (2.70) was equal to the average household size in the County (2.70) but less than most neighboring cities, with the exception of Castro Valley (2.69) (Figure C-3). Dublin's average household size has increased since the 2000 Census, as did the average household size in most neighboring jurisdictions. Appendix C-7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-3: Average Household Size-2000-2010 2.90 2.85 2.80 2.75 2.70 — 2.65 - — 2.60 — — 2.55 — 2.50 -- — 2.45 -- — 2.40 Castro Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Alameda Valley Ramon County ■2000 2.58 2.65 2.80 2.72 2.63 2.71 ■ 201 Ot 2.69 2.70 2.76 2.777 2.85 2.70 Source: Census, 2000&2010. Household Income Table C-7: Household Income Distribution Household income is an important consideration when evaluating housing and Household Income Dublin County community development needs because lower Less than $15,000 4% 10% income typically constrains a household's $15,000 -$24,999 3% 8% ability to secure adequate housing or services. $25,000 -$34,999 4% 7% While housing choices, such as tenure $35,000 -$49,999 6% 11% (owning versus renting) and location of residences, are very much income-dependent, $50,000 -$74,999 14% 16% household size and type often affect the $75,000 -$99,999 12% 12% proportion of income that can be spent on $100,000 -$149,999 28% 17% housing. $150,000 or more 29% 18% According to the 2007-2011 ACS, just four Total 100% 100% percent of Dublin households earned incomes Source: American Community Survey (ACS), 2007- less than $15,000 in 2011, while three percent 2011. of households earned incomes between $15,000 and $24,999 (Table C-7). Approximately 10 percent of City households earned incomes between $25,000 and $49,999, while roughly 26 percent had incomes between $50,000 and $99,999. More than 57 percent of Dublin households earned $100,000 or more. Generally, Dublin households earned higher incomes than households countywide. The ACS estimated that the median household income in Dublin was $111,481 in 2011, while the median income for the County was estimated at $70,821 (Figure C-4). Appendix C-8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-4: Median Household Income- 2011 $140,000 -- $120,000 $111,491 $118,713 $124,014 $100,000 $96,322 $82,370 $80,000 — $70,821 --_ $60,000 - $40,000 $20,000 $0 Castro Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Alameda Valley Ramon County Source:American Community Survey(ACS), 2007-2011. The State and Federal government classify household income into various groups based upon its relationship to the County Area Median Income (AMI) and adjusted for household size. In 2010, approximately 83 percent of Dublin households earned moderate or above moderate incomes and only 17 percent of households earned lower incomes (Table C-8).4 Table C-8: Households by Income Category- 2010 Income Category(%of County AMI) Households Percent Extremely Low(30%or less) 750 6% Very Low(31 to 50%) 695 5% Low(51 to 80%) 850 6% Moderate or Above(over 80%) 10,975 83% Total 13,270 100% Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS), based on American Community Survey(ACS), 2006-2010. 4 Data was obtained from the Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) prepared for HUD by the Census Bureau using 2006-2010 American Community Survey(ACS)data. Appendix C-9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Overcrowding An overcrowded housing unit is defined as a unit occupied by more than one person per room.5 Overcrowding can result when there are not enough adequately sized units within a community, when high housing costs relative to income force too many individuals to share a housing unit than it can adequately accommodate, and/or when families reside in smaller units than they need to devote income to other necessities, such as food and health care. Overcrowding also tends to accelerate deterioration of housing. Therefore, maintaining a reasonable level of occupancy and alleviating overcrowding are important City goals to enhance quality of life for residents and aesthetic quality of neighborhoods. In 2011, overcrowding affected only two percent of Dublin households. By comparison, six percent of Alameda County households were living in overcrowded conditions. The incidence of overcrowding was equal among both renter- and owner-households (two percent each). Although these estimates show overcrowding by tenure to be near equal, proportions of housing units with more than three bedrooms by tenure suggests an inadequate supply of larger rental units. While 64 percent of occupied housing units in the City had more than three bedrooms (the minimum size considered large enough to avoid most overcrowding issues for large households), only 13 percent of these units were occupied by renters. Although a portion of overcrowding problems is likely attributable to a lack of larger housing units available for rent, the incidence of overcrowding is also influenced by other housing problems, such as overpayment. When faced with high housing, many families opt to take on additional roommates in order to share the cost burden or choose to reside in smaller units to save on costs. Overpayment (Cost Burden) State and federal standards for housing overpayment (cost burden) are based on an income-to- housing cost ratio of 30 percent and above. Households paying more than 30 percent of their income on housing have limited remaining income for other necessities. Above moderate income households generally are capable of paying a larger proportion of income for housing; therefore, estimates of housing overpayment generally focus on lower and moderate income households. In 2010, 42 percent of all Dublin households overpaid for housing. Furthermore, overpayment was more likely to affect homeowners rather than renters (47 percent versus 33 percent, respectively). Overpayment was generally concentrated among households at the lower income ranges and affected a larger proportion of renter-households with lower incomes than owner-households. For households earning moderate incomes or above, overpayment affected a larger percentage of homeowners than renters, which indicates that rental housing in Dublin is typically affordable to moderate income households (Figure C-5). 5 Based on the Census Bureau's definition of"room,"which excludes bathrooms, porches, balconies, foyers, halls, or half-rooms. See 2000 Census Long Form, question#37. Appendix C-10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-5: Overpayment by Household Income 100% 90% -- 80% -- 70% ----- 60% 50% 40% -- -- 30% 20% -- 10% - — 0% Extremely Moderate Very Low Low All Income (30% orVless) (31 to 50%) (51 to 80%) (over 80%) Levels e Renter. 85% 97% 92% - 1 5% 33% ■Owner 68% 70% 75% 3% 47%_4 Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development(HUD), Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS), based on American Community Survey(ACS), 2006-2010. D. Special Needs Populations Certain segments of the population may have more difficulty in finding decent, affordable housing due to their special needs. Special circumstances may be related to one's employment and income, family characteristics, disability, and household characteristics, among other factors. Consequently, some Dublin residents may experience a higher prevalence of housing overpayment, overcrowding, or other housing problems than other community members. "Special needs" groups include the following: senior households, single-parent households, large households, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), agricultural workers, military personnel, and homeless (Table C-9). This section provides a detailed discussion of the housing needs facing each particular group as well as programs and services available to address their housing needs. Appendix C-11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-9: Special Needs Groups Number of Owners Renters Percent of Special Needs Group Households or Total Persons # % # % Households/ Person Households that Include at Least One Senior(Age 65+) 2,239 -- -- -- -- 15% Senior-Headed Households 1,680 1,258 75% 422 25% 11% Seniors Living Alone 578 362 63% 216 37% 4% Single-Parent Households 1,011 1,011 7% 46,476 9% 7% Female-Headed Households with 697 -- -- 5% Children Large Households 1,550 1,078 70% 472 30% 10% Persons with Disabilities(Age 5+)** 2,104 -- -- -- -- 5% Agricultural Workers 47 -- -- -- -- <1% Military Personnel 236 -- -- -- -- <1% Homeless 14 -- -- -- -- <1% Source: Census, 2010; American Community Survey (ACS), 2009-2011 and 2007-2011; and Alameda County Housing and Community Development. Notes: *=2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS. **=2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS. Estimate is for persons 5 years of age and over. ***=2013 Alameda Countywide Homeless Count and Survey Report, 2013. Senior Households The population over 65 years of age is considered senior. Many senior households have special housing needs due to their limited and/or fixed incomes, health care costs, and disabilities. In 2010, seniors comprised seven percent of all Dublin residents and approximately 11 percent of Dublin households were headed by seniors. Of these senior-headed households, the majority (75 percent) owned their homes, while the remainder (25 percent) rented their homes. Approximately 47 percent of senior-headed households overpaid for their housing. Generally, this overpayment was more likely to affect senior renters rather than senior homeowners. Specifically, 42 percent of senior homeowners overpaid, while 58 percent of senior renters overpaid.6 Aside from overpayment problems faced by seniors due to their relatively fixed incomes, many seniors are faced with various disabilities. Roughly, 31 percent of Dublin's senior population was listed as having one or more disabilities in 2011 by the ACS. Among these disabilities, the most common were ambulatory, hearing, and independent living difficulties. 6 This figure represents a noticeable increase from the 2000 Census. The increase may be due to a range of factors, including increases in mortgages and rents, increases in utility costs, and large sampling errors due to the small sample size used by the American Community Survey. Appendix C-12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) According to 2-1-1 Alameda County client statistics, householders age 62 and older represented approximately 14 percent of all Dublin callers during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.' Requests for housing and shelter referrals were the most prevalent among all callers, including assistance with senior housing information and referral. Amon other top requests were for information on public assistance programs and legal services, including Medicaid and elder law. Resources The special needs of seniors can be met through a range of services, including congregate care, rent subsides, shared housing, and housing rehabilitation assistance. According to Community Care Licensing Division records, nine community care facilities for the elderly are located in Dublin with a total capacity to serve 54 persons. Affordable housing opportunities located in the City to meet the housing needs of the elderly include: • Carlow Court Senior Apartments at Emerald Vista —49 below market units • Pine and Cedar Groves at Dublin Ranch Senior Apartments—292 below market units • Wicklow Square Senior Apartments—53 below market units Senior residents can benefit from various classes, activities, and programs offered at the Dublin Senior Center. The Senior Center also provides a variety of free health and informational services, including health management classes, health and memory screenings, and health insurance counseling and advocacy. In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance after its adoption in December 2007 and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. In 2010, there was an update to the Ordinance to meet the current building code and which took effect January 1, 2011. Single-Parent Households Single-parent households require special consideration and assistance because of their greater need for day care, health care, and other facilities. Female-headed single-parent households face greater financial difficulties because they often do not have the same earning power as their male counterparts, thus limiting housing availability for this group. Approximately seven percent of Dublin households were headed by single parents in 2010; the large majority of which were headed by females (69 percent). According to the 2007-2011 ACS, 16 percent of female headed single-parent households in Dublin had incomes below the poverty level. 7 Fiscal Year 2012-2013 client statistics provided by Eden Information and Referral, Inc. (Eden I & R), April 2014. The 2-1-1 Alameda County program is a free, non-emergency, confidential, 3-digit phone number and service that provides easy access to housing information, and critical health and human services. The program is operated 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with multi-lingual capabilities. Appendix C-13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Single mother with minor children households represented nearly 29 percent of all Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.' Among top caller needs were referral requests for low income/subsidized rental housing, public assistance program, legal services, information services, and individual and family support services. Resources Limited household income constrains the ability of these households to afford adequate housing and provide for childcare, health care, and other necessities. Finding adequate and affordable childcare is a pressing issue for many families with children. While the City has no specific housing programs targeted at single-parent households, the City's overall efforts to expand affordable housing opportunities will help meet the needs of single-parent households. The City also offers a Youth Fee Assistance Program to enable households with limited income to participate in City-sponsored recreation programs that may be beneficial to single-parent households. Youth programs that are offered include various preschool, elementary and middle school after school programs, and children and teen recreation and educational classes. In February 2010, the City amended the Zoning Ordinance to streamline the approval of Large Family Day Care Homes and in February 2014 amended the Zoning Ordinance to streamline the approval of Day Care Centers. Both Zoning Ordinance amendments reduce the cost and time associated with establishing child care facilities in the City. Large Households Large households (households with five or more members)are identified as a group with special housing needs because of the limited availability of adequately sized, affordable housing units. Large households with lower incomes frequently occupy smaller and more affordable dwelling units to offset potential cost burden,which in turn can accelerate unit deterioration. Approximately 10 percent of Dublin households could be classified as large households in 2010. Over 30 percent of these households rented their homes. As previously discussed, the availability of adequately sized, affordable rental units in Dublin is limited. About 64 percent of occupied housing units in the City had more than three bedrooms (adequate size for larger households) in 2011; however, only a small portion of these units (13 percent)were occupied by renters. 2-11 Alameda County client statistics indicate that approximately seven percent of Dublin callers during Fiscal Year 2012-2013 were large households.' Referral requests for rental and utility payment assistance, food stamps, and eviction prevention assistance were highly prevalent among all callers. Resources The City's large households can benefit from the housing programs and services that are available to all of the City's lower and moderate income households, such as the Housing Choice Voucher program, Commercial Linkage Fee Program, Inclusionary Zoning Program, and Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Program. Such efforts help reduce overcrowding and overpayment among lower and moderate income households, and help reduce the number of large households formed by families or individuals sharing housing arrangements. Appendix C-14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Persons with Disabilities Disability is a physical or mental condition that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Physical disabilities can hinder access to housing units of conventional design, as well as limit the ability to earn incomes sufficient to avoid housing cost burden. The ACS estimates that five percent of Dublin residents over five years of age had a disability in 2011. The ACS also tallied the number of disabilities by type for residents with one or more disabilities. Among the disabilities tallied, ambulatory difficulties were the most prevalent, especially among the City's senior residents. Hearing, cognitive, and independent living difficulties were also common (Table C-10). Table C-10: Disability Status Disabilities Tallied Disability by Age and Type Age 5 to 17 Age 18 to 64 Age 65+ Total With a hearing difficulty 13% 32% 48% 38% With a vision difficulty 24% 18% 21% 20% With a cognitive difficulty 88% 31% 27% 34% With an ambulatory difficulty 13% 39% 57% 45% With a self-care difficulty 36% 19% 17% 19% With an independent living difficulty -- 37% 30% 31% Total Persons with Disabilities 164 949 991 2,104 Source:American Community Survey(ACS),2009-2011. Notes: 1. Tallied only for persons five years and over. 2. Persons may have multiple disabilities. Four factors— affordability, design, location and discrimination — can limit the supply of housing available to households of persons with disabilities. The most obvious housing need for persons with disabilities is housing that is or can be adapted to their needs. Most single-family homes are inaccessible to people with mobility and sensory limitations. Housing may not be adaptable to widened doorways and hallways, access ramps, larger bathrooms, lowered countertops and other features necessary for accessibility. The cost of retrofitting a home often makes homeownership cost-prohibitive, even for individuals or families who could otherwise afford a home. Furthermore, some providers of basic homebuying services do not have offices or materials that are accessible to people with mobility, visual or hearing impairments. Households that had a household member with a disability represented nearly 34 percent of all Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.' Referral requests for help with Medicaid and other medical information, and in home assistance were among the top needs of all callers. Persons with Developmental Disabilities A recent change in State law requires that the Housing Element discuss the housing needs of persons with developmental disabilities. As defined by the Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, "developmental disability" means "a disability that originates before an individual attains age 18 years, continues, or can be expected to continue, indefinitely, and constitutes a substantial disability for that individual. As defined by the Director of Appendix C-15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Developmental Services, in consultation with the Superintendent of Public Instruction, this term shall include mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism. This term shall also include disabling conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for individuals with mental retardation, but shall not include other handicapping conditions that are solely physical in nature." This definition also reflects the individual's need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic services, individualized supports, or other forms of assistance that are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated. The State Department of Developmental Services (DDS) currently provides community based services to approximately 243,000 persons with developmental disabilities and their families through a statewide system of 21 regional centers, four developmental centers, and two community-based facilities. The Regional Center of the East Bay (RCEB) is one of 21 regional centers in the State of California that provides point of entry to services for people with developmental disabilities. The RCEB is charged by the State of California with the care of people with developmental disabilities, defined as those with severe, life-long disabilities attributable to mental and/or physical impairments. The RCEB is a private, non-profit community agency that contracts with local businesses to offer a wide range of services to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. The following information from Area Board 5 of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities provides a closer look at the disabled population. Data shown in Table C-11 estimates the number of Dublin individuals with developmental disabilities, including both RCEB consumers and those unaffiliated with the RCEB. Table C-11: Developmentally Disabled Residents, by Age, for Dublin, 2014 0-14 15-22 23-54 55-65 65+Years Total Years Years Years Years Dublin Total 188 128 174 28 2 520 Source:State Council on Developmental Disabilities,Area Board 5,2014. According to the State's Department of Developmental Services, as of January 2014, about 15 percent of developmentally disabled persons (approximately 78 persons) in Dublin were residing in community care facilities, eight percent were residing in intermediate care facilities (approximately 41 persons), and an additional eight percent (approximately 41 persons) were living with the assistance of Independent Living (IL) services or Supervised Living Services (SLS). The majority of these individuals (63 percent or about 328 persons)were residing in their own home with a parent or guardian. Approximately three percent (about 16 persons) were in foster care and another three percent (about 16 persons) had other living arrangements. Many developmentally disabled persons can live and work independently within a conventional housing environment. More severely disabled individuals require a group living environment where supervision is provided. The most severely affected individuals may require an institutional environment where medical attention and physical therapy are provided. Because developmental disabilities exist before adulthood, the first issue in supportive housing for the developmentally disabled is the transition from the person's living situation as a child to an appropriate level of independence as an adult. Appendix C-16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Resources Services for persons with disabilities are typically provided by both public and private agencies. State and Federal legislation regulate the accessibility and adaptability of new or rehabilitated multi-family apartment complexes to ensure accommodation for individuals with limited physical mobility. As mentioned previously, in 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. Housing options for persons with disabilities also include various community care facilities. Combined, these facilities offer a capacity of 88 beds. These include: • Six Adult Residential Care facilities—34 beds total • Nine Residential Care for the Elderly facilities—54 beds total Agricultural Workers Agricultural workers are traditionally defined as persons whose primary incomes are earned through permanent or seasonal agricultural labor. Permanent farm laborers work in the fields, processing plants, or support activities on a generally year-round basis. When workload increases during harvest periods, the labor force is supplemented by seasonal labor, often supplied by a labor contractor. For some crops, farms may employ migrant workers, defined as those whose travel distance to work prevents them from returning to their primary residence every evening. Determining the true size of the agricultural labor force is problematic. For instance, government agencies that track farm labor do not consistently define farm-workers (e.g. field laborers versus workers in processing plants), length of employment (e.g. permanent or seasonal), or place of work (e.g. the location of the business or field). Further limiting the ability to ascertain the number of agricultural workers within Dublin is the limited data available on the City due to its relatively small size. Therefore, the 2007-2011 ACS is the sole source of information that can be referenced. According to the ACS, only 47 Dublin residents (less than one percent of the City's residents) were employed in the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining industry. Resources Dublin is an urbanized community with no undeveloped parcels zoned for agricultural use. Because a negligible portion of community residents are employed in farming, fishing, and forestry occupations and there is little potential for this occupational category to expand within Dublin, no housing programs or policies specifically targeted at farm-workers are needed. Military Personnel The Camp Parks Reserve Forces Training Area is located in Dublin. Camp Parks supports some 20,000 northern California Army Reserve and California National Guard Soldiers from an estimated 250 reserve component units. Many of these units, however, train at Camp Parks for just two weeks each summer and very few reside in the City. According to the 2007-2011, only 236 Dublin residents (0.7 percent) served in the Armed Forces full-time. Appendix C-17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Resources Because most of the military personnel that use Camp Parks are reservists, few live in Dublin. In 2005, the military constructed 114 homes on the base for military personnel. Because a negligible portion of community residents serve in the Armed Forces full-time, no housing programs or policies specifically targeted at military personnel are needed. Homeless The Alameda Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care Council (HCCC) relies on a "community-defined" definition of homeless; one that includes the HUD-defined chronic homeless population as a subset of the County's overall homeless population. Community- defined homelessness includes people staying in emergency shelters or transitional housing, living on the street or in a car, and people who will lose their housing within a month and have nowhere to go. Assessing a region's homeless population is difficult because of the transient nature of the population. As many as 16,000 people are estimated to be homeless during the course of a year in Alameda County, and more than 5,000 are homeless on any given night. According to the 2013 count, 4,264 people were homeless in Alameda County on January 29, 2013. The homeless population in Dublin was estimated at 14 persons. Based on informal interviews with patrol personnel, the Police estimated that depending on the time of year and weather, the City has a very small amount of homeless persons at a given time. During the winter months the homeless population ranges from one to two persons, if any at all. While during the summer months the homeless population may increase slightly to between two and three persons. Police typically make every effort possible to redirect homeless persons they encounter to shelters, VA sponsored counseling, or various other resources in the County. Over three-quarters (78 percent) of Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013 were extremely low income households.' Referral requests for housing and shelter were highly prevalent among all callers. Specifically, there were a high number of requests for emergency shelter, transitional housing/shelter, and homeless permanent supportive housing. Requests were also highly prevalent for homeless prevention referrals, including access to low income/subsidized rental housing, rental and utility payment assistance, and eviction prevention assistance. Resources Emergency, transitional, and permanent supportive housing is available in Alameda County for people who are homeless, living with HIV/AIDS, and/or mentally ill. Unlike affordable housing in general, housing that is dedicated to one of these populations typically connects with services. The service connection may range from a service coordinator, who can make referrals to services off-site, up to more intensive on-site services. The following provides an overview of Countywide housing resources available to serve the County's homeless population: • Emergency Shelters: An emergency shelter provides overnight shelter and fulfills a client's basic needs (i.e. food, clothing, and medical care) either on site or through off- Appendix C-18 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) site services. The permitted length of stay can vary from one day at a time to three months. • Transitional Housing: This type of facility provides housing for up to two years. Residents of transitional housing are usually connected to supportive services designed to assist the homeless in achieving greater economic independence and a permanent, stable living situation. • Supportive Housing: Permanent supportive housing is service-enriched and linked with on-going supportive services (on-site or off-site) allowing formerly homeless clients to live at the facility on an indefinite basis. Support services can encompass a wide range of activities, such as case management, service coordination (assessing needs and coordinating services), health and mental health care, substance abuse treatment, employment counseling and training, and money management. Services are usually tailored to the needs of the housed individuals, and may be delivered on-site or through linkages to community-based agencies. Approximately 40 agencies throughout the County provide emergency shelter or transitional housing services for both individuals and families. There are no emergency shelters or transitional housing providers located in Dublin. Service agencies located in the nearby City of Livermore, including Shepherd's Gate, Tri-Valley Haven and Livermore Homeless Refuge, provide emergency shelter and transitional housing services for homeless in need. Approximately 26 supportive housing facilities serving both individuals and families are available throughout the County. Supportive housing services are not available in Dublin. The Tri-City Health Center provides Shelter Plus Care supportive housing services to its clients and has a location in nearby Livermore.9 Homelessness is a regional issue that requires the coordination among regional agencies. "EveryOne Home" is Alameda County's road map for ending homelessness. It represents an opportunity to participate in a model of long-term solutions and innovative countywide strategies. Emphasizing a coordinated, efficient regional response to a regional problem will make the best use of the county's resources while building capacity to attract funding from federal, state and philanthropic sources. EveryOne Home envisions the creation of a housing- and-services system that partners with consumers, families and advocates; provides appropriate services in a timely fashion to all in need; and ensures that individuals and families are safely, supportively and permanently housed. The City adopted EveryOne Home in August 2008. The City will continue to support the Alameda County HCCC and agencies and organizations that address the problem of homelessness throughout the region. Dublin provided funding to the Alameda Countywide HCCC for development of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). The HMIS is intended to collect and report information about the homeless population and its patterns of service utilization. In addition, the City of Dublin continues to support the Tri-Valley Haven's Domestic Violence Shelter and Homeless Shelter through Community Development Block Grant funds. 9 2-1-1 Alameda County Online Services Directory, Eden I & R, Inc., January 2014. Appendix C-19 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City will continue to analyze and address impediments to the provision of housing for the homeless and near homeless by facilitating and encouraging the development of affordable housing and facilities for the homeless, including emergency shelters, transitional housing, single room occupancy units, and permanent supportive housing. In April 2011, the Dublin Zoning Ordinance was amended to include provisions for emergency shelters, transitional housing, supportive housing, single room occupancy housing. E. Housing Stock Characteristics The characteristics of the housing stock, including growth, type, age and condition, tenure, vacancy rates, costs, and affordability are important in determining the housing needs for the community. This section details Dublin's housing stock characteristics in an attempt to identify how well the current housing stock meets the needs of current and future residents of the City. Housing Unit Growth and Type Dublin has experienced relatively strong housing growth since 1990. The City's housing stock grew from 6,992 units in 1990 to an estimated 15,782 units in 2010, an increase of approximately 126 percent (Table C-12). Dublin's growth since 1990 has far outpaced the growth observed in all other nearby communities and the County. Table C-12: Housing Stock Growth Jurisdiction #of Units in #of Units in #of Units in %Increase %Increase 1990 2000 2010 1990-2000 2000-10 Castro Valley 19,682 22,003 23,392 12% 6% Dublin 6,992 9,872 15,782 41% 60% Livermore 21,489 26,610 30,342 24% 14% Pleasanton 1 19,356 1 23,968 1 26,053 24% 1 9% San Ramon 1 13,531 17,552 26,222 30% 49% Alameda County 1 504,109 540,183 582,549 7% 8% Source: Census 1990,2000,&2010. Dublin maintains a diverse housing stock. In 2013, single-family homes comprised 66 percent of the housing stock, while multi-family units comprised 33 percent. Less than one percent of the City's housing was comprised of mobile homes (Table C-13). Compared to the County, Dublin's housing stock has a larger proportion of single-family housing and a smaller proportion of multi-family structures. Appendix C-20 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-13: Housing Stock Composition: 2013 Housing Type Dublin County #of Units %of Total #of Units %of Total Single-Family 9,472 54% 311,246 53% Detached Single-Family 2,070 12% 44,965 8% Attached Multifamily 2-4 Units 596 3% 65,581 11% Multifamily 5+ Units 5,324 30% 156,845 27% Mobile Homes/Other 54 <1% 7,837 1% Total Units 1 17,516 1 100% 1 586,474 1 100% Source:California Department of Finance,2013. Housing Age and Condition Housing that is 30 years or older is assumed to require some rehabilitation. Electrical capacity, kitchen features, and roofs usually need updating if no prior replacement work has occurred. Dublin's housing stock is younger than the County's overall, with just 29 percent of the City's housing constructed prior to 1980. By contrast, about 74 percent of the County's housing stock is more than 30 years old (constructed prior to 1980) (Figure C-6 ). Figure C-6: Year Structure Built 40% 35% -- 30% -- — 25% -- _ __ ----- 20% 15% -- 5% _ _ _ 0% 2000 or 1990 to 1980 to 1970 to 1960 to 1940 to Pre- Later 1999 1989 1979 1969 1959 1939 Dublin 38% 16% 17% 7% 19% 2% 1% ■Alameda County 7% 8% 11% 16% 14% 23% 21% Source:American Community Survey(ACS), 2007-2011. Based on the age of the structure alone, it is estimated that approximately one in four housing units in the City may require maintenance or rehabilitation within the Housing Element planning period. However, the actual proportion of Dublin housing units in need of rehabilitation or replacement is likely much lower as high property values in Dublin, even for older homes, Appendix C-21 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) creates a market incentive for most property owners to diligently maintain their dwelling units. From 2007-2013, 838 residential re-roof permits were issued by the Building Division, which reflects a high rate of on-going maintenance and repair by homeowners. For these reasons, the City estimates that less than two percent of the housing stock (<400 units) is in need of rehabilitation and less than one percent is in need of replacement (<150 units). Even this estimate may be high as substandard housing or paint issues led to only 21 code violations of the 3,104 residential code enforcement cases opened since 2008. The Alameda County Community Development Agency administers the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs for the City of Dublin. Low-interest loans up to $1,500 are available to lower income households through the Minor Home Improvement Program. While the Major Home Improvement Program provides loans up to $60,000 at a three percent annual percentage rate for qualified lower income households. Since 2007, on behalf of the City, Alameda County administered Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds and provided 12 minor home repairs, eight paint grants, 11 rehabilitation grants, and five accessibility grants in Dublin. The City will continue to support the Alameda County Community Development Agency to implement the Minor and Major Home Improvement Program. Housing Tenure The tenure distribution of a community's housing stock (owner-occupied versus renter-occupied) Table C-14: Housing Tenure influences several aspects of the local housing market. Residential stability is influenced by tenure, Jurisdiction %Owner- % Renter- with ownership housing evidencing a much lower Occu ied Occu ied turnover rate than rental housing. In addition, housing Castro Valley 69% 31% problems, such as overpayment (cost burden), while Dublin 63% 37% faced by many households, is far more prevalent Livermore 70% 30% among renters. Tenure preferences are primarily Pleasanton 71% 29% related to household income, composition, and age of the householder. In 2010, 63 percent of Dublin San Ramon 71% 29% households (9,425 households) owned the housing Alameda 53% 47% units the occupied, while 37 Count y p percent (5,488 Source: Census, 2010. households) rented their homes (Table C-14). This rate of homeownership is the lowest among neighboring communities, but still noticeably higher than the County's homeownership rate. On average, owner-households were larger than renter-households in 2010 (Table C-15). Among those who owned their homes, 52 percent were households with more than three persons, while just 38 percent of renter-households were comprised of three or more persons. Appendix C-22 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-15: Tenure by Household Size Households Owner- Renter- Occupied Occupied 1 person 17% 30% 2 person 31% 33% 3 person 20% 17% 4 person 21% 12% 5+ person 11% j 9% Average household size 2.86 2.42 Source: Census,2010. The City values its rental housing stock and recognizes its importance for meeting the diverse housing needs of the community. In 2005, the City Council passed a Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing rental housing stock. The Ordinance establishes an annual maximum number of rental apartment units that can be converted to seven percent of the total number of multi-family units in developments of 21 or more rental units. The Ordinance also establishes tenant notification and relocation assistance requirements, limits rent increases once a notice of intent to convert has been filed, and gives tenants the right to purchase units. New condominium conversions are also subject to the City's Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. The City continues to monitor conversion activities annually. There have been no condominium conversions in the City since 2007. Housing Vacancy A certain number of vacant units are needed to moderate the cost of housing, allow sufficient choice for residents, and provide an incentive for unit upkeep and repair. Specifically, vacancy rates of approximately two percent for ownership housing and five to six percent for rental housing are generally considered optimal by housing professionals to balance demand and supply for housing. According to the Census, the overall vacancy rate in Dublin was 5.5 percent in 2010. Specifically, the vacancy rate for ownership housing was 2.5 percent in 2010, while the rental vacancy rate was five percent. Both the ownership and rental vacancy rates for the City were well within the optimal ranges, indicating that the City's housing stock is adequately meeting overall demand. However, affordable housing options in the City may still be in short supply. Housing Costs and Affordability The cost of housing is directly related to the extent of housing problems in a community. If housing costs are relatively high in comparison to household income, there will be a correspondingly higher prevalence of housing overpayment and overcrowding. This section summarizes the cost and affordability of the housing stock to Dublin residents. Homeownership Market According to DataQuick, a company that collects real estate data nationwide, median home prices in Dublin and nearby communities were well above the countywide median price of $485,000 (Figure C-7). Dublin's median sales price during 2013 was $678,000, approximately 28 percent higher than the County's. Home prices in the City have continued to rise steadily in Appendix C-23 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) recent years. Median sales prices have increased over 20 percent annually since 2011 (Table C-16). Most neighboring jurisdictions experienced similar increases in home prices, including Livermore, San Ramon, and Pleasanton. Castro Valley experienced the largest change in median sales price (28 percent) of neighboring jurisdictions between 2012 and 2013, but all were outpaced by the increase that occurred in the County as a whole (33 percent). Asking prices for single-family homes and condominiums in Dublin were also collected from the Zillow online real estate database in an effort to understand Dublin's recent real estate market. The Zillow database listed 31 single-family detached homes and 21 attached homes for sale in February 2014 (Table C-17). The median asking price for a unit was $569,000, with an overall range of $245,000 to $1,737,736. Detached units were priced higher ($709,450 median) than attached units ($419,000 median). Figure C-7: Median Home Sales Price (2013) $800,000 $750,000 $770,000- $700,000 $678,000 $600,000 $534,500 $505,000 $500,000 - $400,000 - Alameda County: $485,000 - $300,000 - - - $200,000 - - - $100,000 - - - - $0 Castro Valley Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Ramon Source: DQNews.com, accessed on January 29, 2014. Table C-16: Median Home Sales Prices: 2011-2013 Jurisdiction 2011 2012 2013 % Change % Change 2011-2012 2012-2013 Castro Valley $390,000 $418,000 $534,500 7% 28% Dublin $440,000 $549,000 $678,000 25% 23% Livermore $378,000 $415,000 $505,000 10% 22% Pleasanton $637,000 $635,000 $750,000 < -1% 18% San Ramon $593,000 $623,000 $770,000 5% 24% Alameda County $338,000 $365,000 $485,000 8% 33% Source: DQNews.com, accessed on February 2014. Appendix C-24 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-17: Home Asking Prices: February 2014 Number Median Unit Type for Sale Asking Price Range Asking Price Detached Homes 31 $415,000 to$1,737,736 $709,450 2-Bedroom 4 $415,000 to$469,000 $453,500 3-Bedroom 6 $549,900 to$830,000 $652,500 4-Bedroom 10 $455,000 to$819,000 $643,750 5+ Bedroom 11 $689,900 to$1,737,736 $1,184,526 Attached Homes 21 $245,000 to$790,000 $419,000 1-Bedroom 8 $245,000 to$368,000 $301,295 2-Bedroom 8 $289,500 to$549,000 $449,450 3+-Bedroom 5 $475,000 to$790,000 $692,000 All Listings 52 $245,000 to$1,737,736 $569,000 Source:Zillow.com, February, 2014. Rental Market The website www.rent.com reported rental price information for 13 apartment complexes within the City of Dublin (Table C-18). In February 2014, only one community offered studio apartments, where available units rented for $1,692 to $1,722. One-bedroom units rented for $1,285 to $2,315 and, as expected, larger units were more expensive. Two-bedroom units were offered from $1,675 to $2,877, while three-bedroom units ranged from $2,165 to $ 3,743 per month. Table C-18: Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 Apartment Complex Rental Price Range Archstone Emerald Park One-Bedroom $1,745 to$1,930 Two-Bedroom $2,210 to$2,437 Three-Bedroom $2,520 to$2,685 Avalon/Eclipse Dublin Station Studio $1,692 to$1,722 One-Bedroom $1,818 to$2,300 Two-Bedroom $2,363 to$2,877 Three-Bedroom $3,227 to$3,743 Connolly Station One-Bedroom $1,738 to$1,838 Two-Bedroom $2,317 to$2,452 Cotton Wood Apartments One-Bedroom $1,470 to$1,560 Two-Bedroom $1,775 to$1,950 Appendix C-25 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-18:Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 Apartment Complex I Rental Price Range Dublin Ranch Senior Community One-Bedroom $1,425 to$1,625 Two-Bedroom $1,675 to$1,825 Eaves Dublin (formerly Avalon Dublin) Studio $1,285 to$1,760 One-Bedroom $1,815 to$2,720 Two-Bedroom $2,165 to$2,265 Emerald Park One-Bedroom $1,705 to$2,110 Two-Bedroom $2,185 to$2,590 Three-Bedroom $2,845 Ironhorse Trail One-Bedroom $1,641 to$1,841 Two-Bedroom $2,083 to$2,323 Three-Bedroom $2,761 to$2,776 Oak Grove at Dublin Ranch One-Bedroom $1,525 to$1,725 Two-Bedroom $1,920 to$2,025 Three-Bedroom $2,270 Park Sierra One-Bedroom $1,674 to$2,081 Two-Bedroom $2,014 to$2,399 The Springs One-Bedroom $1620 to$1,699 Two-Bedroom $1,899 to$2,099 Tralee Apartments One-Bedroom $1,925 to$2,300 Two-Bedroom $2,425 to$2,800 Three-Bedroom $3,350 to$3,450 Waterford Place One-Bedroom $1,930 to$2,315 Two-Bedroom $2,335 to$2,635 Source: www.rent.com,accessed on January 20,2014. Note: This table does not reflect a comprehensive listing of apartment communities in Dublin. Appendix C-26 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Affordability by Household Income Housing affordability can be inferred by comparing the cost of renting or owning a home in the City with the maximum affordable housing costs for households at different income levels. Taken together, this information can generally show who can afford what size and type of housing and indicate the type of households most likely to experience overcrowding and overpayment. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) conducts annual household income surveys nationwide to determine a household's eligibility for federal housing assistance. Based on this survey, the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) developed income limits that can be used to determine the maximum price that could be affordable to households in the upper range of their respective income category. Households in the lower end of each category can afford less by comparison than those at the upper end. The maximum affordable home and rental prices for residents of Alameda County are shown in Table C-19. The market-affordability of Dublin's housing stock for each income group is discussed below. Extremely Low and Very Low Income Households Extremely low income households earn 30 percent or less of the Area Median Income (AMI). Generally, the maximum affordable rental payment ranges from $373 per month for a one- person household to $522 per month for a family of five (Table C-19). The maximum affordable home purchase price for extremely low income households ranges from $63,071 for a one- person household to $78,664 for a five-person household. Very low-income households are classified as those earning 50 percent or less of the AMI. The maximum affordable rental payment ranges from $701 per month for a one-person household to $1,027 per month for a family of five (Table C-19). The maximum affordable home purchase price for very low income households ranges from $124,048 for a one-person household to $172,689 for a five person household. Based on the rental data presented in Table C-18, extremely low and very low income households of all sizes would be unlikely to secure adequately sized and affordable rental housing in Dublin. In addition, according to the Zillow real estate database, no houses of adequate size were listed for sale at prices affordable to these households in February 2014 (Table C-17). Low Income Households Low income households earn 51 to 80 percent of the County AMI. The maximum home price a low income household can afford ranges from $192,006 for a one-person household to $277,653 for a five-person family. Affordable rental rates for low-income households would range from $1,066 for a one-person household to $1,590 for a five-person household. Based upon a review of homes listed for sale in February 2014, low-income households would have great difficulty purchasing an adequately sized home at an affordable price (Table C-17). However, these households do stand a better chance of securing an adequately sized affordable rental unit (Table C-18). Because the City has a limited number of apartment complexes offering three-bedroom units, though, larger low income households will still likely find it hard to find affordable housing options that can comfortably accommodate them. Appendix C-27 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Moderate Income Households Moderate income households earn up to 120 percent of the County AMI. The maximum affordable home price for moderate income households ranges from $398,170 for a one-person household to $595,801 for a family of five. A moderate income household can afford rental rates of$1,846 to $2,794 per month depending on household size. Based on these figures and the real estate data presented in Table C-18, moderate income households could afford many of the attached homes and a limited number of the detached homes listed for sale in February 2014. These households would also be able to afford a wide range of the available rental units in Dublin. Appendix C-28 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-19: Housing Affordability Matrix Alameda County Affordable Housing Cost Utilities,Taxes& Insurance Maximum Annual Income (Including Utilities, Affordable Price Limits Taxes& Insurance Renters Owners Renters Owners Taxes& Rent Sale Ins. Extremely Low Income(0-30%AMI) 1-Person $19,650 $491 $491 $118 $122 $98 $373 $63,071 2-Person $22,450 $561 $561 $135 $143 $112 $426 $71,217 3-Person $25,250 $631 $631 $165 $179 $126 $466 $75,872 4 Person $28,050 $701 $701 $211 $227 $140 $490 $77,733 5 Person $30,300 $758 $758 $236 $268 $152 $522 $78,664 Very Low Income(31-50%AMI) 1-Person $32,750 $819 $819 $118 $122 $164 $1,066 $124,048 2-Person $37,400 $935 $935 $135 $143 $187 $1,218 $140,805 3-Person $42,100 $1,053 $1,053 $165 $179 $211 $1,356 $154,303 4-Person $46,750 $1,169 $1,169 $211 $227 $234 $1,479 $164,776 5-Person 7 $50,500 $1,263 $1,263 $236 $268 $253 $1,590 $172,689 Low Income(51-80%AMI) 1-Person $47,350 $1,184 $1,184 $118 $122 $237 $1,041 $192,006 2-Person $54,100 $1,353 $1,353 $135 $143 $271 $1,190 $218,538 3-Person $60,850 $1,521 $1,521 $165 $179 $304 $1,325 $241,579 4-Person $67,600 $1,690 $1,690 $211 $227 $338 $1,445 $261,827 5-Person 1 $73,050 $1,826 $1,826 $236 $268 $365 $1,553 $277,653 Median Income(81-100%AMI) 1-Person $65,450 $1,636 $1,909 $118 $122 $382 $1,518 $327,031 2-Person $74,800 $1,870 $2,182 $135 $143 $436 $1,735 $372,919 3-Person $84,150 $2,104 $2,454 $165 $179 $491 $1,939 $415,315 4-Person $93,500 $2,338 $2,727 $211 $227 $545 $2,127 1 $454,919 5-Person $101,000 $2,525 $2,946 $236 $268 $5897 $2,289 1 $486,105 Moderate Income(101-120%AMI) 1-Person $78,550 $1,964 $2,291 $118 $122 $458 $1,846 $398,170 2-Person $89,750 $2,244 $2,618 $135 $143 $524 $2,109 $454,104 3-Person $101,000 $2,525 $2,946 $165 $179 $589 $2,360 $506,819 4-Person $112,200 $2,805 $3,273 $211 1 $227 1 $655 $2,594 $556,469 5-Person $121,200 $3,030 $3,535 $236 1 $268 1 $707 $2,794 1 $595,801 Assumptions:2014 HCD income limits30.O%a gross household income as affordable housing cost;20.0%of monthly affordable cost for taxes and insurance; 10.0%downpayment;and 4.0%interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage loan. Utilities based on Alameda County Utility Allowance. Taxes and insurance apply to owner costs only;renters do not usually pay taxes orinsurance. Sources: 1. State Department of Housing and Community Development 2014 Income Limits 2. Housing Authority of the County of Alameda, Utility Allowances-7/1/13. 3. Veronica Tam and Associates Appendix C-29 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) This Housing Element includes a variety of programs designed to improve the adequacy and affordability of housing in Dublin and to assist renters and homeowners who cannot afford housing (see Housing Programs). As of February 2014, a total of 365 Dublin households were receiving rental assistance through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. A total of 26 Dublin households were on the waiting list for rental assistance. The Housing Authority of the County of Alameda administers the program in Dublin. Given the continued need for rental assistance, the City supports and encourages the provision of subsidies through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. The City has also promoted the development of affordable housing units as part of various mixed-use and housing projects and initiatives. In August 2008, a mixed-use project consisting of 305 high density residential units and approximately 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial completed construction at the Dublin Transit Center. The project, Avalon at Dublin Station (now known as Eclipse at Dublin Station), is an apartment community with 10 percent of the units set aside for moderate income households. In March 2011, Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct an additional 505 high density residential apartment units at the Dublin Transit Center. 10 percent of the units will be set aside for moderate income households. The project is currently under construction. In addition, the City worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of the Emerald Vista mixed-income development project. The City provided application/technical assistance as needed by the developer in order to securing financing and other sources of funding to support the development of the project. The project was approved by the Dublin City Council in September 2009 and includes the demolition of 150 existing affordable housing units and the construction of 378 new housing units (both attached and detached) including market rate, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and community building. The project includes 194 (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units) affordable units in various income categories. The project was completed in May 2013 and all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased. The City of Dublin continues to encourage developers to provide affordable housing by awarding qualifying developments with additional market rate units. In 2006, the City initiated a First Time Homebuyer Loan Program (FTHLP) to assist lower and moderate income households with financing towards the purchase of a home. The City provides information on this program on the City website. The website is routinely updated to provide current information on various housing opportunities in Dublin and the region. Since 2007, the City has assisted a total of 54 households with first-time homebuyer loans. The City adopted an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance in 2002 to assure that housing development contributes to the attainment of the City's housing goals by increasing the production of residential units affordable by households of very low, low, and moderate income. In December 2008, the City Council approved an amendment to the Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance to eliminate the requirement to construct owner-occupied very low income units. This modification was in response to feedback the City was receiving from the development community on the feasibility of constructing owner- occupied very low income units. Since 2007, the City has issued 332 permits for the construction of affordable housing units. Furthermore, the City currently has a balance of$7,013,816 in its Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee fund. The City will continue to enforce the provisions of its Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance to further Housing Appendix C-30 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Element goals and policies related to meeting the housing needs of all income segments of the community. F. Affordable Housing Inventory Ten assisted rental housing developments in Dublin provide 982 affordable rental units (Table C-20). This inventory of assisted units includes a review of all multi-family rental units under federal, state, and/or local programs, including HUD programs, state and local bond programs, redevelopment programs, and local in-lieu fees (inclusionary, density bonus, or direct assistance programs). All of these projects are recent developments with the most recent being Emerald Vista. Emerald Vista, formally known as Arroyo Vista, has historically been supported by the Housing Choice Voucher Program. Emerald Vista was redeveloped in 2013 to include 378 units, of which 194 are reserved as affordable units (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units). The City worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of this project, which includes market rate units, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and a community building. The project was completed in May 2013; all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased and all 14 affordable for-sale units have been sold. Generally, deed restrictions ensure the long-term affordability of below market rate units. No project is at risk of converting to market rate within the planning period (July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2025) due to expiration of deed restrictions or subsidy contracts. Appendix C-31 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-20: Inventory of Assisted Rental Housing Project Name Total Assisted T Funding Date of Earliest #Units Type Units Units Source At Risk Conversion Iron Horse Trails 177 2 Senior/ Private 2032 0 Disabled Park Sierra 283 57 Senior Tax Credits 2055 0 Bonds Tax Credits Pine Groves/Cedar Groves 322 292 Senior Bonds 2062 0 City Loan Wicklow Square 54 53 Senior/ Tax Credits 2059 0 Disabled City Loan Tax Credits Oak Groves 304 243 Family Bonds 2061 0 City Loan HCD MHP Grant Senior/ Tax Credits Camellia Place 112 111 Disabled/ 2062 0 Family CaIHFA Bonds HOME Eclipse at Dublin Station 305 30 Family Private 2062 0 Carlow Court Senior Senior/ City Loan Apartments at Emerald 50 49 Disabled 2067 0 Vista Private Wexford Way Apartments Family/ City Loan at Emerald Vista 130 129 Disabled 2067 0 Private Total 1,867 982 0 Source: Alameda/Contra Costa Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Opportunities Guide, February 2013; California Housing Partnership Coalition,2008; City of Dublin,2014. Appendix C-32 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) G. Estimates of Housin-g Needs The Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) developed by the Census for HUD provides detailed information on housing needs by income level for different types of households in Dublin. Detailed CHAS data based on the 2006-2010 American Community Survey is displayed in Table C-21. Based on CHAS, housing problems in Dublin include: • Units with physical defects (lacking complete kitchen or bathroom); • Overcrowded conditions (housing units with more than one person per room); • Housing cost burden, including utilities, exceeding 30 percent of gross income; or • Severe housing cost burden, including utilities, exceeding 50 percent of gross income. The types of problems vary according to household income, type, and tenure. Some highlights include: • In general, owner-households were more likely to experience housing problems (48 percent)than renter-households (35 percent). • Large family renter-households, though, had the highest level of housing problems regardless of income level (71 percent). All very low and low income large family renter households experienced a housing problem between 2006 and 2010. • Very low income households were the most likely to be affected by a housing problem (84 percent). Extremely low (78 percent) and low income (82 percent) households were also significantly affected by these issues. • Of the 754 extremely low income Dublin households identified by the 2006-2010 ACS, approximately 77 percent spent more than 30 percent of their monthly income on housing and 65 percent spent more than 50 percent. Appendix C-33 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-21: Housing Assistance Needs Renters Owners Total Household by Type,Income& Elderly Small Large Total Elderly Large Total Hhlds Housing Problem Families Families Renters Families Owners Extremely Low 120 135 0 425 90 4 329 754 0-30% MFI %with any housing problem 92% 70% -- 85% 100% 100% 70% 78% •with cost burden >30% 92% 70% -- 85% 100% 100% 68% 77% •with cost burden >50% 42% 70% -- 68% 89% 100% 60% 65% Very Low 40 115 35 325 145 30 365 690 31-50% MFI %with any housing problem 100% 91%1 100% 97% 52% 100% 73% 84% %with cost burden >30% 100% 91% 100% 97% 52% 67% 70% 82% %with cost burden >50% 50% 78% 100% 83% 24% 67% 52% 67% Low 45 150 35 310 155 95 540 850 51-80% MFI •with any housing problem 100% 90% 100% 94% 32% 95% 75% 82% •with cost burden >30% 100% 87% 100% 92% 35% 95% 75% 81% %with cost burden >50% 100% 43% 29% 53% 19% 95% 55% 54% Moderate/Above Moderate 335 1,550 185 3,410 670 814 7,559 10,969 >80% MFI •with any housing problem 39% 15% 59% 17% 32% 36% 44% 35% •with cost burden >30% 37% 15% 16% 15% 32% 34% 43% 34% %with cost burden>50% 9% 1% 0% 1% 10% 12% 11% 8% Total Households 540 1,950 255 4,470 1,060 943 8,793 13,263 •with any housing problem 60% 29% 71% 35% 41% 44% 48% 43% •with cost burden >30% 59% 29% 39% 33% 41%1 42% 1 47%1 42% %with cost burden >50% 27% 13% 18% 17% 20% 22% 17% 17% Source: HUD Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS),2006-2010 ACS data. Notes: Data presented in this table are based on special tabulations from sample Census data. The number of households in each category usually deviates slightly from the 100 percent count due to the need to extrapolate sample data out to total households. Interpretations of these data should focus on the proportion of households in need of assistance rather than on precise numbers. Appendix C-34 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Housing Constraints Although the City of Dublin strives to ensure the provision of adequate and affordable housing to meet the needs of the community, many factors can constrain the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing. These include market mechanisms, government regulations, and physical as well as environmental constraints. This section addresses these potential constraints that affect the supply and cost of housing in Dublin. A. Market Constraints Several local and regional constraints hinder the ability to accommodate Dublin's demand for affordable housing. The high cost of land, rising development costs, and neighborhood opposition can make it expensive for developers to build affordable housing. These constraints may result in housing that is not affordable to lower and moderate income households, or may render some potential residential projects economically infeasible for developers. Land and Construction Costs High development costs in the region stifle potential affordable housing developments. An indicator of construction costs is Building Valuation Data compiled by the International Code Council (ICC). The unit costs compiled by the ICC include structural, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical work, in addition to interior finish and normal site preparation. The data is national and does not take into account regional differences, and does not include the price of the land upon which the building is built. The national average for development costs per square foot for apartments and single-family homes in August 2013 are as follows: • Type I or Il, Multi-Family: $131.94 to $150.25 per sq. ft. • Type V Wood Frame, Multi-Family: $100.18 to $104.74 per sq. ft. • Type V Wood Frame, One and Two Family Dwelling: $110.29 to $117.71 per sq. ft. Because of higher land values in the Bay Area, however, overall development costs per square foot in Dublin may be higher. Furthermore, neighborhood resistance to projects can draw out the entitlement process and drive up costs. The difficulty of developing awkward infill sites can also add to the cost of housing. Reduction in amenities and the quality of building materials (above a minimum acceptability for health, safety, and adequate performance) could lower costs and associated sales prices or rents. In addition, prefabricated factory-built housing may provide for lower priced housing by reducing construction and labor costs. Another factor related to construction costs is the number of units built at one time. As the number of units increases, overall costs generally decrease due to economies of scale. The price of raw land and any necessary improvements is a key component of the total cost of housing. The diminishing supply of land available for residential construction combined with a fairly steady demand for housing has served to keep the cost of land high. High and rapidly increasing land costs have resulted in home builders developing increasingly expensive homes in order to capture profits. In general, high density residential land in the City costs approximately $1.7 million per acre, according to a Keyser Marston 2014 analysis. Residential land for townhomes is estimated at approximately$2.1 million per acre. Appendix C-35 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) A density bonus up to 35 percent over the otherwise maximum allowable residential density under the applicable zoning district is available to developers who provide affordable housing as part of their projects. Developers of affordable housing are also entitled to at least one concession or incentive as established in the Zoning Ordinance. Density bonuses, together with the incentives and/or concessions, result in a lower average cost of land per dwelling unit, thereby making the provision of affordable housing more feasible. The City regularly updates its Density Bonus Ordinance to reflect changes in State law. Availability of Mortgage and Rehabilitation Financing The availability of financing affects a person's ability to purchase or improve a home. Interest rates are determined by national policies and economic conditions, and there is little that local government can do to affect these rates. Jurisdictions can, however, offer interest rate write- downs to extend home purchasing opportunities to a broader economic segment of the population. In addition, government-insured loan programs may be available to reduce mortgage down payment requirements. Under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), lending institutions are required to disclose information on the disposition of loan applications and the income, gender, and race of loan applicants. As shown in Table C-22, a total of 1,726 households applied for loans, either conventional or government-backed, to purchase homes in Dublin in 2012. Approval rates were higher for conventional home purchase loans with an approval rate of 78 percent, in comparison to 74 percent of government loan applications being approved. The approval rate for home improvement loans was 65 percent. Given the high rates of approval for home purchase and improvement loans, financing was generally available to Dublin residents. Overall, the majority of loan applications submitted in Dublin during 2012 were for home refinancing (4,142 applications), 76 percent of which were approved. Table C-22: Disposition of Home Purchase and Improvement Loan Applications-2012 Loan Type Total Percent Percent Percent Applications Approved Denied Other Government Backed Purchase Loans 288 74% 13% 13% Conventional Purchase Loans 1,438 78% 10% 12% Refinance 4,142 76% 10% 14% Home Improvement Loans 65 65% 28% 8% Total 5,933 76% 11% 13% Source:www.LendingPatterns.com ,2013. Notes: 1. Percent Approved includes loans approved by the lenders whether or not accepted by the applicant. 2. Percent Other includes loan applications that were either withdrawn or closed for incompleteness. Foreclosures Foreclosure may occur when households fall behind on one or more scheduled mortgage payments. The foreclosure process can be halted if the homeowner is able to bring mortgage payments current. If payments cannot be resumed or the debt cannot be resolved, the lender can legally use the foreclosure process to repossess (take over) the home. If the home is worth Appendix C-36 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) less than the total amount owed on the mortgage loan, a deficiency judgment could, under some circumstances, be pursued. The homeowner would lose their home and might also owe the home lender an additional amount. Homes can be in various stages of foreclosure. Typically, the foreclosure process begins with the issuance of a Notice of Default (NOD). An NOD serves as an official notification to a borrower that he or she is behind in their mortgage payments, and if the payments are not paid up, the lender may take title to the home. In California, lenders will not usually file an NOD until a borrower is at least 90 days behind in making payments. As of December 2013, 23 properties in Dublin were in this pre-foreclosure stage. Once an NOD has been filed, borrowers are given a specific time period, typically three months, in which they can bring their mortgage payments current. If payments are not made current at the end of this specified time period, a Notice of Trustee Sale (NTS) will be prepared and published in a newspaper. An NTS is a formal notification of the sale of a foreclosure property. In California, the NTS is filed 90 days following an NOD when a property owner has failed to make a property loan current. Once an NTS has been filed, a property can then be sold at public auction. According to foreclosure records, 20 properties in Dublin were in the auction stage of the foreclosure process as of December 2013. Construction Financing Prior to the recession of the early 1990s, and significant changes in lending practices following the savings and loan scandal of the late 1980s, developers could receive loans for 100 percent or more of a project's estimated future value. Now, construction and permanent loans are rarely available for over 75 percent of the future project value for multifamily developments. This means that developers must usually supply at least 25 percent of the project value. The financing of a residential project, particularly affordable housing is quite complex. No firm threshold determines an acceptable `return' on investment, nor the maximum equity contribution at which an otherwise feasible project becomes infeasible. Upfront cash commitment may not be problematic for some developers as long as the project can generate an acceptable net cash flow to meet the acceptable returns. Although financing costs impact project feasibility, these problems are generally equal across jurisdictions and thus are not a unique constraint to housing production in Dublin. B. Governmental Constraints City ordinances, policies, and other regulations can impact the price and availability of housing in Dublin. Land use controls, site improvement requirements, building codes, fees, and other local programs to improve the overall quality of housing may serve as constraints to housing development. The following public policies can affect overall housing availability, adequacy, and affordability. Land Use Controls The General Plan includes policies for all three of the City's Planning Areas: the Primary Planning Area, Eastern Extended Planning Area, and Western Extended Planning Area. The Primary Planning Area consists of the original 1982 City boundaries and those annexations occurring to the west between 1985 and 1991. This area encompasses roughly 3,100 acres. Appendix C-37 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The Eastern Extended Planning Area is located east of the Primary Planning Area, while the Western Extended Planning Area is located west of the Primary Planning Area. Primary Planning Area The General Plan Land Use Element and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan establish land use controls within the Primary Planning Area. General Plan Land Use Element: The majority of the Primary Planning Area has been developed since the 1960s: therefore. the Land Use Element of the General Plan focuses on the remaining uncommitted sites and on the potential for more intensive use of existing sites Table C-23: General Plan Land Use Element Classification Density Dwelling Units Low Density Single Family 3.8 167 Single Family 6.0 5,411 Medium Density 14.0 2,668 Medium-High Density 25.0 1,960 Medium-High and Retail/Office 25.0 280 Mixed Use 25.0 382 Total 10,868 Downtown Dublin Specific Plan: This new Specific Plan was adopted in 2010 and combines the areas of the previous Downtown Core Specific Plan, Dublin Downtown Specific Plan, San Ramon Road Specific Plan, Village Parkway Specific Plan, and West Dublin BART Specific Plan into one comprehensive plan. Downtown Dublin is largely built out, which means that new development projects will primarily replace (or expand upon) existing developments and land uses. This Specific Plan allows for the future construction of approximately 1,300 residential dwelling units as follows: Table C-24: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan District Density Dwelling Units Retail 0.35 FAR 100 Transit-Oriented 85.0 du/acre 1,100 Village Parkway 15.0 du/acre 100 Total 1 1 1,300 By April 2014, only 291 units were not entitled and developer interest in constructing additional residential units Downtown exceeded the number of units remaining to be built. As a result, the City amended the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan on July 15, 2014 to increase residential development opportunities in the three districts (see also discussions under the Housing Resources section of this Technical Background Report.) Eastern Extended Planning Area The Eastern Extended Planning Area is located east of Dublin's older urbanized area and consists of 3,454 acres, of which 1,657 acres is designated for residential uses. Residential designations for this planning area are outlined in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. The Specific Appendix C-38 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Plan includes seven land use classifications that allow for residential development: High Density (HDR), Medium-High Density (MHDR), Medium Density (MDR), Single Family (SF), Estate Residential (ER), Rural Residential/Agricultural (RRA). Taken together, the Specific Plan projects a total of 14,619 housing units upon buildout at the following densities: Table C-25: Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Classification Density(du/acre) Dwelling Units Rural Residential/Agricultural 0.01 3 Estate Residential 0.80 24 Single Family 6.00 4,350 Medium Density 14.00 5,293 Medium High Density 25.00 3,302 High Density 25.10+ 1,647 Total 14,619 Western Extended Planning Area Located along the north side of 1-580, west of the City's older urbanized area, the Western Extended Planning Area covers approximately 3,255 acres. The Single-Family designation of the Primary Planning Area and the Rural Residential/Agriculture designation of the Eastern Extended Planning Area are applicable in the Western Extended Planning Area. An additional residential designation unique to this planning area is the Estate designation. The Estate designation is intended for typical ranchettes and estate homes at 0.01 to 0.8 units per gross acre. An Urban Limit Line was adopted by initiative on November 7, 2000 for the Western Extended Planning Area. The Urban Limit Line is located along the City limit line as of the initiative's effective date. Pursuant to the initiative, lands west of the Urban Limit Line are designated as Rural Residential/Agriculture on the General Plan Land Use Map and are within the City's Sphere of Influence. Approximately 2,647 acres lies west of the Urban Limit Line and has been designated Rural Residential/Agriculture. The Initiative is effective for a period of 30 years from the effective date of City Council Resolution 209-00 (November 7, 2000), and the Line's location may be changed only with voter approval during the effective period, and only following review and approval of a General Plan Amendment by the City Council. Any request to change the Urban Limit Line must be accompanied by a request to amend the land use designation to an urban designation. The Urban Limit Line is established to discourage urban sprawl. The City has adequate capacity within the Urban Limit Line to meet its housing needs and therefore, this Line does not present an actual constraint to housing development. Approximately 485 acres lie east of the Urban Limit Line, of which 365 acres are Open Space. The remainder of the Western Extended Planning Area is comprised of the Schaefer Ranch residential development which has been approved for up to 406 residential units. The following table sets forth the development potential of the Western Extended Planning Area. Appendix C-39 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-26: Western Extended Planning Area Classification Density(du/acre) Dwelling Units Rural Residential/Agricultural 0.01 26 Estate Residential 0.80 30 Single Family 6.00 400 Total 456 Livermore Airport Influence Area (AIA) The Livermore Municipal Airport is owned and operated by the City of Livermore. The Airport is a General Aviation Airport which serves private, business, and corporate tenants and customers. The airport is situated on 643 acres of land within the City of Livermore and is located adjacent to the Las Positas Golf Course and the Water Reclamation Plant. Parts of eastern Dublin fall within the Livermore Airport Influence Area and projects that propose to amend the General Plan and/or Eastern Dublin Specific Plan or propose to rezone property within this area are subject to review by the Alameda County Airport Land Use Commission for consistency with the Alameda County Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan (ALUCP). The Airport Land Use Commission has 60 days to review and issue a determination on a project. However, the City Council has the authority to override the Commission's determination with a two-thirds vote. Within the Livermore Airport Influence Area (AIA) is a more restrictive Airport Protection Area (APA). The APA prohibits the establishment of new residential uses or the intensification of existing residential uses. The City currently does not have any residential uses within the APA. The APA could be considered a constraint on housing development in Dublin as it prohibits residential uses along Dublin Boulevard where the City has historically planned higher density residential. However, in balancing the housing needs of the community with safety and exposure to excessive aircraft noise, the prohibition of residential uses within the APA is reasonable. Conclusion The City's residential land use designations facilitate and encourage the provision of a wide range of housing types including single-family dwellings, mobile homes, townhomes, condominiums, second dwelling units, and multi-family units at various densities. Therefore, Dublin's land use regulations are not a constraint to residential development. Residential Development Standards The City regulates the type, location, density, and scale of residential development primarily through the Zoning Ordinance. Zoning regulations are designed to protect and promote the health, safety, and general welfare of residents as well as implement the policies of the General Plan. The following zoning districts allow residential uses: • Agricultural (A): The A zoning district is intended, in part, to preserve and protect agricultural lands that are being used for the commercial production of agricultural commodities consistent with the General Plan and applicable Specific Plans and appropriate standards of public health, safety, welfare, and aesthetics. Agricultural Appendix C-40 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) housing, mobile homes and single-family homes on large rural lots are permitted in the A district. • Single-Family Residential (R-1): The R-1 district is intended to provide for and protect neighborhoods comprised of detached, single-family homes and residential use types compatible with a quiet, family-living environment. The district is consistent with the Low-Density Single-Family Residential, Single Family-Residential, and Medium Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-1 district is expressed as a suffix to the R-1 Zoning Map symbol (e.g., R-1-5,000, R-1- 10,000, etc.). • Two-Family Residential (R-2): The R-2 district is intended to provide for two-family dwellings that have characteristics similar to single-family neighborhoods, duplexes, and residential use types compatible with a quiet living environment. The R-2 district is consistent with the Medium Density Residential, and Medium-High Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-2 district is expressed as a suffix to the R-2 Zoning Map symbol. • Multi-Family Residential (R-M): The R-M district is intended to provide for and protect neighborhoods comprised of single family residences, two family residences, and multi- family residences that are clustered to provide generous open space areas for common use, and that are generally close to transit, shopping, and public facilities. The R-M district is consistent with the Medium Density Residential, Medium-High Density Residential, and High-Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-M district is expressed as a suffix to the R-M Zoning Map symbol. Dublin's Zoning Ordinance establishes residential development standards for each zone to ensure quality of development in the community (Table C-27). Characteristic standards applicable to residential development in the City include standards for lot area, lot width and frontage, lot coverage, setbacks, height limits, and parking. Developers of certain affordable and senior housing may request a variety of incentives, including concessions, modifications, or waivers of otherwise applicable development standards set forth in Chapter 8.36 of the Zoning Ordinance. Reduced setbacks, reduced parking, concentration of affordable units, and reduced bedroom sizes were granted in 2003 to facilitate the development of 596 affordable housing units at the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves projects within The Groves at Dublin Ranch (formerly known as Fairway Ranch). In 2009, the City approved the Emerald Vista project (formerly Arroyo Vista) and granted reduced parking requirements for the affordable units. Additionally, in 2013 the City approved an affordable housing project geared towards veterans and granted reduced parking requirements as well as relaxed design standards. For properties within Specific Plan areas, development standards are provided within the respective Specific Plan. In the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area, development standards are further tailored to individual projects through the Planned Development Zoning and site plan review process. This provides developers with a basic set of development standards and guidelines as well as flexibility to enhance project feasibility and deviate from traditional Appendix C-41 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) development standards contained in the Zoning Ordinance. Flexible development standards include parking requirements, lot coverage, setbacks, and landscaping among other standards. Table C-27: Residential Development Standards Standard A R-1 R-2 R-M Lot Area Interior Lot 100 acres 4,000 sq.ft. 8,000 sq. ft. 5,000 sq. ft. Comer Lot 100 acres 5,000 sq. ft. 9,000 sq. ft. 6,000 sq. ft. 4,000 sq.ft. and 4,000 sq.ft. and Min. Lot Size NA larger as consistent larger as 750 sq. ft. and larger as w/General Plan consistent w/ consistent w/General Plan General Plan Lot Width and Frontage Interior Lot 300 ft. 50 ft. 80 ft. 50 ft. Comer Lot 300 ft. 60 ft. 90 ft. 60 ft. Lot Depth NA 100 ft. 100 ft. 100 ft. Residential Use 1 dwelling unit 1 dwelling unit 1 dwelling unit per full 750 sq. (Max. Per Lot) 1 Second Unit 1 Second Unit 2 dwelling units ft. and larger as consistent w/ General Plan Setbacks 20 ft. average 20 ft. average Front 50 ft. 18 ft. minimum to 18 ft. minimum 20 ft. garage(2) Side 30 ft. (3) 10 ft. 10 ft. (4) Street Side 50 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. Rear 50 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 30 ft. Other Distance between 100 ft. 10 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. Residences Max. Lot 40% 1 story, 40% 1 story, 40% 1 story, Coverage NA 35%2 stories 35%2 stories 35%2 stories Common Useable NA NA NA 30%of net site area Outdoor S ace Accessory Storage NA NA 200 cubic feet 200 cubic feet min. per unit Multi-Famil min. per unit Height Limits (1) (1) (1) (5) Source: City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance,2013. Notes: 1. West of Dougherty Road,25 ft. and 2 stories; may be increased to 35 ft. and 2 stories pursuant to a Site Development Review approval by the Zoning Administrator. East of Dougherty Road,35 ft.and 2 stories. 2. Living spaces may encroach to 15 ft. from Front Lot Line with Site Development Review on lots up to 6,000 sq. ft. in size. 3. Side Yard setbacks in the R-1 zoning district shall be a minimum of 5 ft. plus one foot for each full 10 ft. by which lot width exceeds minimum lot width up to a maximum of 10 ft. 4. Buildings with four or more residences in the R-M zoning district must have a 15-ft.Side Yard on one side. 5. 35 ft. if four or fewer dwelling units; 45 ft. if five or more dwelling units; 75 ft. if five or more dwelling units and lot coverage does not exceed 35 percent. 6. Multifamily accessory storage shall be provided for each unit in a multifamily project that has a private,enclosed garage attached or assigned to the unit. In addition to the R-2 and R-M Zoning Districts, multifamily accessory storage shall also be provided in comparable PD(Planned Development)Zoning Districts and the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. Appendix C-42 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City's height limits are set with respect to neighborhood character and allowable densities. Building height limits in the R-M zone are permitted up to 75-feet for projects with five or more dwelling units and therefore have not constrained residential development. Additionally, residential development in Planned Development Zoning Districts around the Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station is allowed to be constructed with up to five stories of residential uses over parking, recognizing the advantages of compact transit-oriented development in providing affordable housing opportunities. Similarly, residential development in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area around the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station is allowed to be constructed with up to eight stories and a maximum building height of 90 feet. Parking requirements for different types of residential uses in Dublin are summarized in Table C-28. Dublin's parking requirements for a prototypical 100-unit multi-family residential development are comparable to requirements of nearby cities (Table C-29). Additionally, the City has approved reduced parking standards through the Planned Development Zoning process for multi-family residential and mixed use developments adjacent to the Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station; residential uses adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station also benefit from reduced parking standards contained in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Appendix C-43 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-28: Dublin Parking Requirements for Residential Uses Residential Use Types Number of Parking Spaces Required Apartments Studio 1 Bedroom 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus 1 parking space for 2+Bedrooms unreserved and guest parking. Condominiums Studio 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus 1 guest parking space 1 Bedroom per dwelling which shall be marked as a guest parking space. 2+ Bedrooms 2 covered or garaged spaces per dwelling plus 1 guest parking space per dwelling which shall be marked as a guest parking space. Single-Family/Duplex Lots<4,000 sq.ft. 2 in enclosed garage per dwelling*plus one on-street parking space per dwelling unit within 150 feet of that dwelling unit. Lots>4,000 sq.ft. 2 in enclosed garage per dwelling.* Other Parking Requirements Senior Citizen Housing 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus one guest parking space for every three dwelling units. Second Unit 1 parking space per unit. The space may be compact, uncovered, and in tandem with the required parking of the principal dwelling unit. Agricultural Housing Community Care Facility, 2 per dwelling Small Mobile Home Residential Use Secondary 2 per residence to Commercial Use Mobile Home Park 2 per dwelling, plus 1 guest space for every 2 dwellings 1 parking space for every 20 beds plus 1 parking space for each Emergency Shelter employee on the largest shift plus 1 parking space for each company vehicle Transitional Housing (Small) Supportive Housing(Small) 2 Per dwelling Transitional Housing (Large) 1 Supportive Housing(Large) per 3 employees on largest shift, plus 1 per 3 beds Single Room Occupancy 1 per unit plus 1 guest parking space for every 3 units SRO Source:City of Dublin,Zoning Ordinance,2014. Notes: *Except if two, full-size, unenclosed parking spaces are provided elsewhere on a lot for the purposes of converting a residential garage to living space. Appendix C-44 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-29: Comparison of Parking Requirements for Residential Uses Unit Type Dublin San Ramon Livermore Pleasanton Single-Family 2.0/unit 2.0-4.0/unit 1.0-2.0/unit 2.0/unit Multi-Family Studio unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.5-2.0/unit3 1-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.5-2.0/unit3 2-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 1.5-2.0 1unit3 3-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 4-Bedroom+ unit 1.0/unit 3.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit Guest Spaces Varies2 25% 25% 14% Prototypical Multi- Family Rental 200 spaces 200 spaces 200 spaces 181 spaces Project' Sources: City of Dublin Municipal Code, 2014; City of San Ramon Municipal Code, 2014; City of Livermore Municipal Code,2014;and City of Pleasanton Municipal Code,2008. Notes: 1. Prototypical project assumes: 25% 1-bedroom units; 50% 2-bedroom units; and 25% 3- bedroom units 2. Requirement ranges from 33%for senior projects to 100% for condominium projects and for apartments. 3. Requirement for first 4 units; 1.5 spaces per unit required for each unit thereafter. Although the provision of off-street parking can increase the cost of housing, Dublin's standards are reasonable as requirements for multi-family developments are less than requirements for single-family detached dwellings and comparable to or lower than parking requirements of nearby jurisdictions. Guest space requirements for multi-family developments are also reasonable because these types of developments do not have private driveways for each unit to accommodate parking for guests as is required for new single-family homes on lots larger than 4,000 square feet. Nevertheless, because the increased cost of off-street parking can impact the financing of housing affordability, reduced parking and other incentives, concessions, or waivers and modifications of development standards are available for affordable projects that are eligible for a density bonus pursuant to Chapter 8.52 of the Zoning Ordinance. Additionally, as mentioned previously, the City has granted reduced parking standards for numerous affordable housing projects including Wicklow Square, The Groves at Dublin Ranch, Emerald Vista and the veterans housing project in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. Reduced parking standards are also available for transit-oriented development projects that are proposed adjacent to both BART stations in the City. Provision for a Variety of Housing State Housing Element law specifies that jurisdictions identify adequate sites to be made available through appropriate zoning and development standards to encourage the development of various types of housing for all economic segments of the population. This includes single-family housing, multi-family housing, mobile homes, agricultural housing, emergency shelters, and transitional housing, among others. Table C-30 summarizes the various housing types permitted and conditionally permitted under the Zoning Ordinance. Appendix C-45 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-30: Residential Uses by District Uses A R-1 R-2 RM C-O C-N C-1 C-2 M-P M-1 M-2 Single-family Residence P P P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Agricultural Housing C/ZA -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Second Unit -- P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Mobile Home P P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Mobile Home Parks -- C/PC C/PC -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Multifamily Dwellings -- -- P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Community Care p P P P Facility, Small Community Care C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC Facility, Large Transitional Housing P P P P (Small)-� -- -- -- -- -- Transitional Housing C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC -- (Large) Supportive Housing P P P P Small -� -- -� -- Supportive Housing C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC (Large) Emergency Shelters -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- P -- Single Room Occupancy Unit Mixed Use' -- C/PC -- -- -- -- C/PC -- -- -- -- Source: City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance,2014. Notes: P — Permitted Use; C/ZA — Conditional Use Permit/Zoning Administrator; C/PC Conditional Use Permit Planning Commission;--Not Permitted; ""Residential Use Secondary to Commercial Use" is defined as a residence located above the ground floor commercial uses and is referred to herein as"Mixed Use." Single-Family Residence The term "Single-Family Residence" is defined in the Zoning Ordinance as a building designed for and/or occupied exclusively by one family. The definition also includes factory-built housing, modular housing, manufactured housing, mobile homes, and the rental of bedrooms within a single-family dwelling to no more than four borders. Single-family residences are permitted in all residential zoning districts. Agricultural Housing Agricultural housing is defined as dwellings and/or living quarters for farm laborers, or other types of dwellings determined to be substantially similar to the above by the Director of Community Development. Agricultural Housing shall not be in addition to a Caretaker Residence or a Farm Mobile Home. The 2007-2011 found that only 47 Dublin residents (less than one percent of the City's residents) were employed the in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining industry. Despite the limited number of agricultural workers in the City, Agricultural Housing is permitted in the A district with approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Zoning Administrator. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The Zoning Administrator must make the following findings established in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance prior to approval of a CUP for agricultural housing: Appendix C-46 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • The proposed use and related structures is compatible with other land uses, transportation and service facilities in the vicinity. • It will not adversely affect the health or safety of persons residing or working in the vicinity, or be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare. • It will not be injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood. • There are adequate provisions for public access, water, sanitation, and public utilities and services to ensure that the proposed use and related structures would not be detrimental to the public health, safety, and welfare. • The subject site is physically suitable for the type, density and intensity of the use and related structures being proposed. • It will not be contrary to the specific intent clauses, development regulations, or performance standards established for the zoning district in which it is located. • It is consistent with the Dublin General Plan and with any applicable Specific Plans. However, pursuant to the State Employee Housing Act (Section 17000 of the Health and Safety Code), employee housing for agricultural workers consisting of no more than 36 beds in a group quarters or 12 units or spaces designed for use by a single family or household is permitted by right in an agricultural land use designation. Therefore, for properties that permit agricultural uses by right, a local jurisdiction may not treat employee housing that meets the above criteria any differently than an agricultural use. Furthermore, any employee housing providing accommodations for six or fewer employees shall be deemed a single-family structure with a residential land use designation, according to the Employee Housing Act. Employee housing for six or fewer persons is permitted where a single-family residence is permitted. No conditional or special use permit or variance is required. The City requires a CUP for all agricultural uses. Similarly, employee housing on agriculturally designated land requires the approval of a CUP. Second Units A Second Unit is a residential unit with separate kitchen, sleeping, and bathroom facilities that is a part of, an extension to, or detached from, a detached single-family residence, and is subordinate to the principal residence. Second units may be an alternative source of affordable housing for lower income households and seniors. California law requires local jurisdictions to adopt ordinances that establish the conditions under which second dwelling units are permitted (Government Code, Section 65852.2). A jurisdiction cannot adopt an ordinance that precludes the development of second units unless findings are made acknowledging that allowing second units may limit the housing opportunities of the region and result in adverse impacts on public health, safety, and welfare. An amendment to the State's second unit law in September 2002 requires local governments to use a ministerial, rather than discretionary process for approving second units (i.e. second units otherwise compliant with local zoning standards can be approved without conditions or a public hearing). Appendix C-47 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City adopted a Second Unit Ordinance in 2003 to allow second dwelling units in the R-1 zoning district with a ministerial permit. The Community Development Department will issue a building permit for a second unit if all building permit submittal requirements are met, and if it conforms to the specific standards contained in Section 8.80.040 of the Zoning Ordinance, including but not limited to: • The lot is occupied by a legal existing, detached single-family unit. • The total floor area is not less than 275 square feet or more than 1,000 square feet. In no case shall a second unit exceed 35 percent of the total floor area of the existing single-family residence. • The second unit shall conform to the development standards of the R-1 district. • One off-street parking space is required but may be uncovered and in tandem with the parking of the principal unit. • The principal residence and the second unit combined shall not cover more than 60 percent of the lot. These development standards are typical and consistent with State law. Since adoption of the Ordinance in 2003, 89 second units have been constructed. Nearly all of these second units (88 units) were constructed during the last Housing Element planning period. An additional 44 second units are expected to be constructed during the current Housing Element planning period. Multi-Family Housing Multi-Family housing includes duplexes, apartments, condominiums, or townhomes. As of 2013, multi-family housing units constituted approximately 33 percent of Dublin's housing stock. The Zoning Ordinance provides for multi-family developments by-right in the R-2 and R-M zoning districts. The R-2 zoning district is consistent with the Medium Density and Medium- High Density Residential land use designations of the General Plan which allow for 6.1 — 25.0 dwelling units per acre. The R-M zoning district is consistent with the Medium, Medium-High and High Density Residential land use designations of the General Plan which allow for 6.1 — 25.0+ dwelling units per acre. The General Plan does not place an upper limit on High Density Residential land uses. Furthermore, the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan allows for the development of High Density Residential at 25 units per acre or greater, while the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan allows for Transit Oriented Development at a density of 85 units per acre. Mobile Homes and Mobile Home Parks Mobile homes offer an affordable housing option to many lower and moderate income households. The City permits mobile homes constructed after September 15, 1971 and issued an insignia of approval by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and permanently located on a permanent foundation system by right in the A, R-1, and R-2 districts. Mobile Home Parks require approval of a CUP by the Planning Commission within the R-1 and R-2 zoning districts. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The required findings for approval of a CUP are stated in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance and are the same as described above for agricultural housing. Community Care Facilities Community care facilities are defined as residential facilities that provide 24-hour care for individuals, including the elderly, persons in an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility, persons in a facility for mentally disordered, handicapped persons or dependent and Appendix C-48 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) neglected children, persons in an intermediate care facility/developmentally disabled- habilitative, intermediate care facility/ developmentally disabled-nursing, and congregate living health facilities. A community care facility may be located in any type of residence. Consistent with the State Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, small community care facilities serving six or fewer persons are permitted within all residential zones. Large community care facilities serving seven or more persons require approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Planning Commission within the R-1, R-2, R-M, C-1, C-2, M-P, and M-1 zoning districts. Potential conditions for approval may include hours of operation, security, loading requirements, and management. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The required findings for approval of a CUP are stated in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance and are the same as described above for agricultural housing. As of January 2013, a number of community care facilities are operating in the City of Dublin:16 • Six adult residential facilities with a total capacity of 34 beds; • Two group homes for children with a total capacity of 12 beds; and • Nine residential care facilities for the elderly with a total capacity of 54 beds. Transitional Housing Transitional Housing units or facilities provide a residence for homeless individuals or families for an extended period of time, usually six months or longer, which also offers other social services and counseling to assist residents in achieving self-sufficiency. Transitional Housing may be accessory to a public or civic type use. The City amended the Zoning Ordinance in 2004, and in 2011, to facilitate and encourage the provision of transitional housing. Transitional housing that operates as group housing is subject to the same permitting requirements as community care facilities consistent with the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act. Transitional housing that is regular housing is permitted where similar housing is otherwise permitted. The City will review and revise, as necessary, the Zoning Ordinance to clarify transitional housing as a residential use and subject only to those restrictions that apply to other residential uses of the same type in the same zone. Emergency Shelters The term "Emergency Shelter" means a housing facility that provides temporary, short-term housing, with minimal supportive services, for homeless individuals or families, provided that no facility shall be used as temporary, short-term housing by any individual or family for more than 30 consecutive days. The City amended the Municipal Code to permit emergency shelters in the M-1 (Light Industrial)Zoning District and similar PD (Planned Development)Zoning Districts, if the project site has an Industrial Park or Business Park/Industrial General Plan land use designation. Approximately 67 parcels in the City meet these requirements with a combined acreage of 180 acres. Many of these properties are located near public transit with access to various supportive services and are currently developed with aging, distressed, and/or vacant structures ripe for redevelopment. Applicable development and performance standards are set forth in Section 8.45 of the Municipal Code and are as follows: 16 State Department of Social Services, Licensing Division. http://www.ccld.ca.aov/docs /ccld search/ccld search.aspx. Appendix C-49 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Off Street Parking: 1 parking space for every 20 beds plus 1 parking space for each employee on the largest shift plus 1 parking space for each company vehicle. • On-Site Management and Security: On-site management and on-site security shall be provided during the hours when the Emergency Shelter is in operation. • External Lighting: The Emergency Shelter shall provide external lighting in accordance with building security requirements contained in Chapter 7.32 to maintain a safe and secure environment. • Emergency Shelter Management Plan: The operator of an Emergency Shelter shall prepare and submit a management plan to the Community Development Director. • Length of Stay: No individual or family shall reside in an Emergency Shelter for more than 30 consecutive days. • Proximity to Public Transit and Services: An Emergency Shelter shall be located near public transportation, supportive services and/or commercial services to meet the daily needs of shelter residents. If necessary, an Emergency Shelter shall ensure a means of transportation for shelter residents to travel to and from related supportive services provided off-site. • Noise/Nuisances: All activities associated with an Emergency Shelter shall be conducted entirely within the building. Noise shall be limited so as not to create an adverse impact on surrounding uses. No loudspeakers or amplified sound shall be placed or project outside of the shelter. • City, County and State Requirements: An Emergency Shelter shall obtain and maintain in good standing all required licenses, permits, and approvals from City, County and State agencies or departments. An Emergency Shelter shall comply with all County and State health and safety requirements for food, medical and other supportive services provided on-site. The City's off street parking requirement for emergency shelters is less restrictive than the parking requirements for other uses in the same districts. For example, a 10,000 square foot light industrial building that has 2,000 square feet of office space and 8,000 square feet of warehouse, distribution or production space would require 16 parking spaces. A 100-bed emergency shelter in the same building would require 5 parking spaces plus 1 parking space for each employee and company vehicle, if applicable. State law (SB 2 — Housing for the Homeless) specifies standards that can be regulated by the local ordinance. The City's zoning provisions for emergency shelters include proximity to public transit or noise provisions, which are not specified in SIB 2. The only distance requirement permissible under SIB 2 is the 300-foot distance from another emergency shelter. SIB 2 allows the regulating of other standards only if other uses in the same zone are subject to the same standards. The City will review and revise as necessary the proximity to public transit and noise provisions of the Emergency Shelters Ordinance to comply with State law. Mixed Use Residential uses located above the ground floor of a commercial use are conditionally permitted in the R-1 and C-1 zoning districts and require approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Planning Commission. The City has had much success in promoting and attracting new mixed use development throughout the City, particularly in recent years. These mixed-use projects include: Appendix C-50 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • AMB/Prologis: 308 multi-family apartment units and 150,000 square feet of office space adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station • Tralee Village: 233 multi-family units include 130 apartment units over 33,500 square feet of ground floor commercial and 103 townhouse units • Eclipse at Dublin Station: formerly Avalon at Dublin Station, 305 multi-family apartment units over 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial • Essex/Connolly Station: 309 multi-family apartment units adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station; future phases include 150-room hotel and 7,500 square feet of commercial • Crown Chevy Redevelopment Site: 314 multi-family apartment units over 17,000 square feet of ground floor commercial and 72 affordable rental units for veterans Single Room Occupancy Units (SROs) SRO units are one-room units intended for occupancy by a single individual. It is distinct from a studio or efficiency unit, in that a studio is a one-room unit that must contain a kitchen and bathroom. Although SRO units are not required to have a kitchen or bathroom, many SROs have one or the other. In April 2011, the Dublin Municipal Code was amended to conditionally permit SROs in the C-2 district, or comparable PD Zoning District, as long as the following development standards and regulations are met: • All required findings in Chapter 8.100 (Conditional Use Permit) can be made. • Common bathroom facilities are provided on-site if individual units do not contain a bathroom. • Common kitchen facilities are provided on-site if individual units do not contain a kitchen. • Individual Single Room Occupancy Units may contain either kitchen or bathroom facilities, but shall not contain both. • Off-street parking is provided in accordance with Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations). • All new construction or conversion of existing structures complies with Chapter 8.104 (Site Development Review). • All other applicable provisions of the Zoning Ordinance are met. Supportive Housing California Government Code Section 65582 (f) defines "supportive housing" as housing with no limit on length of stay, that is occupied by the target population, and that is linked to an onsite or offsite service that assists the supportive housing resident in retaining the housing, improving his or her health status, and maximizing his or her ability to live and, when possible, work in the community. Government Code Section 65582 (g) further defines "target population" as persons with low incomes who have one or more disabilities, including mental illness, HIV or AIDS, substance abuse, or other chronic health condition, or individuals eligible for services provided pursuant to the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code) and may include, among other populations, adults, emancipated minors, families with children, elderly persons, young adults aging out of the foster care system, individuals exiting from institutional settings, veterans, and homeless people. The City amended the Zoning Ordinance in 2011 to facilitate and encourage the provision of supportive housing. Supportive housing that operates as group housing is subject to the same permitting requirements as community care facilities consistent with the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act. Supportive housing that is regular housing is permitted Appendix C-51 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) where similar housing is otherwise permitted. The City will review and revise, as necessary, the Zoning Ordinance to clarify supportive housing as a residential use and subject only to those restrictions that apply to other residential uses of the same type in the same zone. Site Improvements, Exactions, and Development Fees Site Improvements For large subdivisions, the City requires the construction of reasonable on- and off-site improvements pursuant to the Subdivision Map Act. The minimum improvements required of the developer include: • Grading and improvement of public and private streets including surfacing, curbs, gutters, cross gutters, sidewalks, ornamental street lighting, street name signs and necessary barricades and safety devices; • Storm drainage and flood control facilities within and outside of when necessary the subdivision sufficient to carry storm runoff both tributary to and originating within the subdivision; • Debris basins and erosion and siltation control measures to control erosion and siltation; • A sewage system that meets public sewer system standards; • A water distribution system providing an adequate supply of potable water to each lot and fire hydrant within the subdivision; • Fire hydrants and connections shall be of the type and at locations specified by the fire marshal; and • Public utility distribution facilities including gas, electric, telephone and cable television necessary to serve each lot in the subdivision. The City also requires dedication of land intended for public use. Dedicated streets, easements, rights-of-way, etc., must be designed, developed, and improved according to City of Dublin Public Works standards. Street design criteria are summarized in Table C-31. Table C-31: Street Design Criteria Minimum Service Right of Curb to and Design Criteria Way Curb Curve Landscape Radius Easement Arterials 4-lane 104' 80' 1,200' 107side 6-lane 128' 104' 1,200' 107side 8-lane 152' 128' 1,200' 107side Collectors Class 1 92' 76' 1,100' 107side Class II 68' 52' 450' 107side Residential 56' 40' 450' 57side Residential 46' 36' 200' 57side Cul-de-Sacs 46' 36' 200[ 1 57side Source: City of Dublin,2014. Appendix C-52 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Residential development projects with more than 20 residential units must comply with the City's Public Art Program pursuant to Chapter 8.58 of the Zoning Ordinance. Under the Program, developers are required to acquire and install a public art project on or in the vicinity of the development site, or make a monetary contribution in-lieu. The value of the public art project or in- lieu monetary contribution shall equal or exceed 0.5 percent of the development project's building valuation (excluding land). The purpose of the City's Public Art Program is, in part, to promote the public interest and general welfare through the acquisition and installation of public art works. Participation in the program by residential projects with more than 20 units is not an undue constraint on housing development in the City because: 1) the requirement applies to single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartments alike; and 2) housing projects that set-aside 100 percent of units for lower income households are exempt from the public art requirement. The City often requires dedication of bicycle paths for the use and safety of residents of large residential subdivisions. Schools, fire stations, libraries, or other public facilities may also be required. Park dedication or fee in-lieu of dedication required according to the standard of five acres per one thousand persons, consistent with the Quimby Act. This ratio amounts to 740.5 square feet per single-family unit, 675.2 square feet per multi-family unit, and 370.3 square feet per mobile home unit proposed. Specific standards for design and improvements of subdivisions must be in accordance with the applicable sections of the Zoning Ordinance, the General Plan, the Subdivision Ordinance, any specific plans adopted by the City, and requirements established by the City Engineer. Improvement and dedication requirements are important to maintaining the quality of life in Dublin and to ensuring public health and safety. These standards are typical in the region. Development Fees and Exactions In addition to improvements and dedication of public land, land developers are subject to a variety of fees and exactions to cover the cost of processing permits and providing necessary services and facilities. In general, these fees can be a constraint on housing development and compromise project feasibility because the additional cost bome by developers contributes to overall increased housing unit cost. However, the fees are necessary to maintain adequate planning services and other public services and facilities in the City. The City's Planning Division fee schedule is summarized in Table C-32 and current development impact fees are provided in Table C-33. Reduced, waived, or reimbursed fees are possible incentives that can be requested under the City's Density Bonus Ordinance. The City has demonstrated a commitment to providing concessions that facilitate the construction of affordable housing by waiving future commercial linkage fees on commercially-zoned property within the Dublin Ranch community as an incentive for a developer to provide additional affordable units as part of the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves apartment communities. A total of 626 rental units have been constructed within the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves communities of which 535 units are affordable to very low, low and moderate income households, for both families and seniors. Appendix C-53 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-32: Planning Division Fee Schedule Services Performed Fee Typical Deposit* Residential CUP $1,939 N/A Time Extension Request(PC) $1,125 N/A Time Extension Request(Admin) $225 N/A Zoning Clearance $50 N/A Residential Variance T&M Varies Site Development Review T&M Varies Planned Development T&M $10,000 Tentative Subdivision Map T&M $10,000 Tentative Parcel Map T&M $10,000 CEQA Initial Study and Negative Declaration T&M $25,000+ CEQA Initial Study and Mitigated Negative T&M $25,000+ Declaration CEQA Initial Study and Environmental Impact Report T&M $50,000+ General Plan Amendment T&M $10,000 Specific Plan Amendment T&M $10,000 Rezone T&M $10,000 Source: City of Dublin,2014. Note: *Deposits are based on the City Planner's estimate of hours necessary to complete review of the project. Additional deposits may be required at a later date. Any remaining funds are refunded after the completion of the project. Appendix C-54 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-33: Development Impact Fees Fee Type I Amount Fee Type Amount Water System Connection Fee Freeway Interchange Reimbursement Traffic Impact Fees Single-Family $11,931/du Low/Medium Density4 $333.72/du Multi-Family I Varies' Medium/High Densitys $233.60/du Water Meter Assembly Fee High Densitys $200.22/du Single-Family $58 /du Tri-Valley Transportation Development Fee Multi-Family Varies' Attached Units $2,3131du Regional Sewer Connection Fee Detached Units $1,472/du Single-Family $14,383/du Downtown Traffic Impact Fee Multi-Family Apt: $9,479/du Low/Medium Density4 $2,378 Condo: $10,788/du Local Sewer Connection Fee Medium/High Densitys $1,666 Single-Family $1,746/du High Densitys $1,426 Multi-Family Apt: $1,151/du Noise Mitigation Fee(East Dublin Only) Condo: $1,309/du Public Facilities Fee Single-Family/ $4.74/du Medium Density Single-Family Total $22,070/du Parks, Land $11,8631du Medium High Density $3.32/du Parks, Improvements $5,1161du Multi-Family $13,794/du Parks, Land $7,4131du High Density $2.85/du Parks, Improvements $3,1991du School Impact Fees Eastern Dublin Traffic Impact Fees3 Citywide $4.97/sf Low/Medium Density4 $8,686-$9,476/du Fire Impact Fee Medium/High Density' $6,081 -$6,634/du Single-Family $870/du High Densitys $3,954-$5,685/du Multi-Family $544/du Drainage Fee 13 All Units $1.00/sf Source: City of Dublin,January 1,2014. Notes: ' Varies, depending on size of the water meter. 4<14 units per acre. 3 Additional fees for East Dublin and Schaefer Ranch 514 to 25 units per acre. Varies by category and location inside or outside of 6>25 units per acre. Transit Center Area. Total fees average about $68,418 per single-family unit and about $41,398 per multi-family unit. Based on the median asking prices of homes summarized in Table C-17, total fees comprise approximately ten percent of sales costs for single-family and multi-family units. These figures include school, water, and sewer fees that are imposed by outside agencies over which the City has no control. The City's Public Facilities fee includes park land and improvement fees (which make up the bulk of the total Public Facilities Fee), as well as additional fees for community buildings, libraries and the Civic Center. To provide flexibility in meeting these parks and recreation requirements, the City allows developers to dedicate or reserve lands, pay fees in lieu thereof, or a combination of both, for neighborhood and community park or recreational purposes. The City complies with the Quimby Act with regard to parks and open space fees. Appendix C-55 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Other significant impact fees (such as water and sewer connection fees and regional transportation improvement fees)are set by regional agencies/service providers. Furthermore, land in the City is fairly expensive. According to a Keyser Marston 2014 analysis, the cost of high density residential land in Dublin is estimated at approximately $1.7 million per acre. Residential land for townhomes is estimated to be over$2 million per acre. Given the high land cost and construction costs, planning and development fees for residential development in Dublin constitute less than ten percent of the overall development costs. Fees are not considered a constraint to housing development in Dublin. Nevertheless, the City recognizes the impact of fees on affordable housing development. Therefore, the City offers deferment or amortization of fees for senior housing and housing for lower income households. In addition to deferment or amortization of fees, and as noted above, the City has demonstrated a commitment to providing concessions that facilitate the construction of affordable housing by waiving commercial linkage fees on commercially-zoned property within the Dublin Ranch community in order to facilitate the development of affordable housing within the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves apartment communities Inclusionary Housing The City adopted an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance in 2002. Under the Regulations, all new residential development projects of 20 units or more designed and intended for permanent occupancy must construct 12.5 percent of the total number of dwelling units within the development as affordable units. Of the affordable rental units, 30 percent must be set aside for very low income households, 20 percent for low income households, and 50 percent for moderate income households; of the owner occupied affordable units, 40 percent must be set aside for low income households and 60 percent for moderate income households. (The City amended the Ordinance in December 2008 to remove the requirement of very low income units for for-sale housing to recognize that requirement's cost impact on feasibility.) The City will continue to work with stakeholders to review and consider modifications to the Inclusionary Zoning Regulations to enhance their feasibility. The Ordinance provides for five exceptions to the 12.5 percent affordability requirement (Section 8.68.040): • Payment of in-lieu fees; • Off-site projects; • Land dedication; • Credit transfers; and • Waiver of requirements. Pursuant to the Ordinance, developers can pay as an in-lieu fee up to five percent of the inclusionary housing requirement, with the remaining 7.5 percent of the requirement as must- build units. Any request for payment of in-lieu fee above the five percent requires City Council approval. The amount of in-lieu fee is adjusted annually based on real estate indicators. Therefore, the fee is sensitive to the fluctuation in market conditions. Currently, the in-lieu fee is set at $96,000 per affordable unit required. The fee has remained fairly level during the last two years. Appendix C-56 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The last exception, waiver of requirements, gives the City Council flexibility to make exceptions to the Ordinance. Also, Section 8.68.070 provides incentives to make the construction of affordable units more feasible, including: • Fee Deferral— processing and impact fees • Design Modifications- - Reduced lot size - Reduced setback requirements - Reduced open space requirements - Reduced landscaping requirements - Reduced interior or exterior amenities - Reduction in parking requirements - Height restriction waivers For example, the Positano project is a single-family detached residential product that is subject to the Inclusionary Ordinance. In order to assist the developer in making the provision of affordable housing more feasible, the City Council granted the developer's request that a portion of the affordable units be provided off-site or through the payment of in-lieu fees. The City has also granted the developer's request to provide affordable housing in the form of second dwelling units. Since adoption of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance in 2002, the City has approved more than 8,000 housing units by private developers. Given the flexibility and incentives offered by the City's Inclusionary Housing program, and as demonstrated by the significant housing development entitled after the adoption of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance, the City's affordable housing requirements are not constraining residential development. Furthermore, the City's High Density Residential zone offers a density of over 25 units per acre. Since there is no established maximum density and the City offers flexibility through its PD process, a project can be tailored to ensure feasibility. Development Permit Procedures Development review and permit procedures are necessary steps to ensure that residential construction proceeds in an orderly manner. The following discussion outlines the level of review required for various permits and timelines associated with those reviews. The timelines provided are estimates; actual processing time may vary due to the volume of applications and the size and complexity of the projects. Single-Family All new single family dwellings are subject to Site Development Review approval by either the Director of Community Development or the Planning Commission. The Building and Safety Division of the Community Development Department also reviews building permit applications for conformity to adopted building codes. Approval of a building permit for a single-family dwelling is ministerial and processing time is highly dependent on the quality of the initial submittal. Multi-Family Housing All multi-family housing projects are subject to Site Development Review by the Planning Commission. If the multi-family housing is proposed as a condominium, the approval process also includes a subdivision map. The tentative subdivision map and Site Development Review Appendix C-57 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) are processed concurrently. The application procedure is established in Chapter 8.104 of the Zoning Ordinance. The purpose of the review is to: A. To preserve the architectural character and scale of neighborhoods and the community. B. To ensure that development is well designed in relation to surrounding properties, including that the design, character, height, facade length, roof forms, colors, materials, roof mounted equipment and architectural details of a proposed structure or remodeled structure are compatible with the design, character, height, facade length, roof form, colors, materials and architectural details of structures in the vicinity. C. To ensure that projects enhance their sites and are harmonious with high standards of improvements in the surrounding area. D. To enhance the residential and business property values within the City. E. To ensure compliance with development regulations and the requirements of zoning districts, including but not limited to, setbacks, height, parking, landscaping, public art, fences, accessory structures and signage. F. To ensure that each project is designed to comply with the intent and purpose of the zoning district in which it is located and with the General Plan and applicable Specific Plan. G. To promote the health, safety and general welfare. H. To ensure that projects provide adequate circulation for automobiles as well as pedestrians and bicyclists to create a pedestrian friendly environment. The following findings must be made prior to the approval of a Site Development Review application: A. The proposal is consistent with the purposes of this Chapter, with the General Plan and with any applicable Specific Plans and design guidelines. B. The proposal is consistent with the provisions of Title 8, Zoning Ordinance. C. The design of the project is appropriate to the City, the vicinity, surrounding properties and the lot in which the project is proposed. D. The subject site is physically suitable for the type and intensity of the approved development. E. Impacts to existing slopes and topographic features are addressed. F. Architectural considerations including the character, scale and quality of the design, site layout, the architectural relationship with the site and other buildings, screening of unsightly uses, lighting, building materials and colors and similar elements result in a project that is harmonious with its surroundings and compatible with other development in the vicinity. Appendix C-58 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) G. Landscape considerations, including the location, type, size, color, texture and coverage of plant materials, and similar elements have been incorporated into the project to ensure visual relief, adequate screening and an attractive environment for the public. H. The site has been adequately designed to ensure proper circulation for bicyclists, pedestrians and automobiles. As the Site Development Review is required for residential and non-residential uses alike and the findings are the same for all uses subject to the requirement, the Site Development Review process is not a constraint on the provision of multi-family housing in Dublin. Processing Timeframes Processing time frames for single-family and multi-family subdivisions vary depending on a number of factors, including size, location, environmental constraints, and developer responsiveness. Much of the newer residential development (single-family and multi-family) is located within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Area and is governed by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and associated Environmental Impact Report. The Specific Plan establishes land use designations for all property within the Specific Plan area and contains development standards such as dwelling units per acre and floor area ratio. The Specific Plan also includes design guidelines and resource management. These standards and guidelines coupled with the Planned Development Zoning process provide the developer with a framework for development as well as flexibility to design a project without being limited by traditional setbacks and lot coverage restrictions. Planned Development Zoning is processed concurrently with site plan review and therefore does not increase the processing timeline. Additionally, the certification of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Specific Plan area reduces the processing timelines for development projects that are consistent with the Specific Plan. For example, all of the high-density residential projects at the Dublin Transit Center as well as the Dublin Ranch communities of Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves were deemed categorically exempt from further environmental review because they were consistent with the Specific Plan. The one factor that contributes to increased processing timelines is the lack of responsiveness by developers to public agency comments. This lack of response often results in additional review time that increases the processing timeline and costs associated with the project. However, since adoption of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and Planned Development Zoning in 1994 the City has been able to work successfully with the development community resulting in the approval of over 13,000 residential units. Building Codes and Enforcement The City of Dublin currently uses the following Codes: 2012 Edition of the International Building Code (2013 CA Building Code); 2012 Edition of the International Fire Code (2013 CA Fire Code); 2012 Edition of the Uniform Mechanical Code (2013 CA Mechanical Code); 2012 Edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code (2013 CA Plumbing Code); 2012 Edition of the National Electrical Code (2013 CA Electrical Code); and 1997 Uniform Housing Code. The Planning and Building Divisions of the Community Development Department carry out code enforcement and inspection activities as a means to preserve and maintain the livability and quality of neighborhoods. City staff investigates violations of property maintenance standards as defined in the Municipal Code as well as other complaints. When violations are identified or cited, staff encourages property owners to seek assistance through available housing rehabilitation programs. Although current building codes may be a barrier to the rehabilitation of Appendix C-59 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) older properties that are required to be brought up to current code standards, the intent of the codes is to provide structurally sound, safe, and energy-efficient housing. The City of Dublin proactively enforces property maintenance, graffiti and substandard housing ordinances throughout the City. Between 2007 and 2012, Code Enforcement officials documented 3,104 residential code violations. When code violations are unable to be resolved through voluntary compliance or through the nuisance abatement procedure, the City refers such cases to the City Attorney for prosecution. The City Attorney's office may seek injunctions, receivership and civil lawsuits to achieve compliance with City codes. Since 2007, no residential building-related cases were referred to the City Attorney's office. The City will continue to enforce property maintenance standards and abate substandard structures through Code Enforcement. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Both the federal Fair Housing Amendment Act (FHAA) and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act direct local governments to make reasonable accommodations (i.e. modifications or exceptions) in their zoning laws and other land use regulations when such accommodations may be necessary to afford disabled persons an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling. The City assessed its zoning ordinance, permitting procedures, development standards, and building codes to identify potential constraints for housing for persons with disabilities. The City's policies and regulations regarding housing for persons with disabilities are described below. Zoning and Land Use Under State Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (aka Lanterman Act), small community care facilities for six or fewer persons must be treated as regular residential uses and be permitted by right in all residential districts; Dublin is compliant with the Lanterman Act. Large community care facilities for more than six persons are conditionally permitted within the R-1, R-2, R-M, C-1, C-2, M-P, and M-1 zoning districts. Potential conditions for approval may include hours of operation, security, loading requirements, and management. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to unduly constrain the development of residential care facilities for more than six persons. The City has not adopted a spacing requirement for community care facilities. The Land Use Element and Zoning Ordinance provide for the development of multi-family housing in the R-2 and R-M zoning districts. Regular multi-family housing for persons with special needs, such as apartments for seniors and the disabled are considered regular residential uses permitted by right in these zones. The Zoning Ordinance has a provision to allow exceptions to development standards for accessory structures (Section 8.40.020.F.2.a). Similarly, the Development Regulations section of the Zoning Ordinance has provisions that allow for encroachments into required setbacks (Section 8.36.050.B.2 & 3). These exceptions/encroachments are allowed citywide and could accommodate a wide range of needs for persons with disabilities. However, circumstances may arise when it would be reasonable to accommodate requests from persons with disabilities to waive a setback requirement or another standard of the Zoning Ordinance to ensure that homes are accessible for the mobility impaired. Whether a particular modification is reasonable depends on the circumstances, and must be decided on a case-by- case basis. In April 2011, the City adopted a formal ministerial process for persons with Appendix C-60 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) disabilities to seek relief from the strict or literal application of development standards to enable them to enjoy their dwellings like other residents in Dublin. The City has not established any special distance requirements for the housing for persons with disabilities. Therefore, the State distance standard of 300 feet applies. In order to facilitate housing for persons with disabilities, the City offers fee deferment or amortization for senior housing (which often includes accessible units and is occupied by many seniors with disabilities.) Building Codes The City enforces Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations that regulates the access and adaptability of buildings to accommodate persons with disabilities. In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base Universal Design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance after its adoption in December 2007 and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. In 2010, there was an update to the Ordinance to meet the current building code and which took effect January 1, 2011. The City will continue to enforce the provisions of this ordinance. Government Code Section 12955.1 requires that 10 percent of the total dwelling units in multi- family buildings without elevators consisting of three or more rental units or four or more condominium units be subject to the following building standards for persons with disabilities: • The primary entry to the dwelling unit shall be on an accessible route unless exempted by site impracticality tests. • At least one powder room or bathroom shall be located on the primary entry level served by an accessible route. • All rooms or spaces located on the primary entry level shall be served by an accessible route. Rooms and spaces located on the primary entry level and subject to this chapter may include but are not limited to kitchens, powder rooms, bathrooms, living rooms, bedrooms, or hallways. • Common use areas shall be accessible. • If common tenant parking is provided, accessible parking spaces is required. No unique Building Code restrictions are in place that would constrain the development of housing for persons with disabilities. Compliance with provisions of the City's Municipal Code, California Code of Regulations, California Building Standards Code, and federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is assessed and enforced by the Building and Safety Division of the Community Development Department as a part of the building permit submittal. Definition of Family Local governments may restrict access to housing for households failing to qualify as a "family" by the definition specified in the Zoning Ordinance. Specifically, a restrictive definition of "family" that limits the number of and differentiates between related and unrelated individuals Appendix C-61 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) living together may impermissibly limit the development and siting of group homes for persons with disabilities but not for housing families that are similarly sized or situated.18 In April 2011, the City of Dublin amended its definition of "family." The Zoning Ordinance now defines a "family" as one or more persons occupying a dwelling and living as a single, non-profit housekeeping unit, including any servants. This is distinguished from a group occupying a boarding house, community care facility, supportive or transitional housing when configured as group housing, hotel or motel, club, fraternity or sorority house. Conclusion After the extensive Zoning Ordinance revisions completed in 2011, there are no longer any City policies or regulations that serve to constrain housing for persons with disabilities. However, the City will continue to monitor the Zoning Ordinance for potential constraints and make amendments as needed. C. Public Policy Constraints State and Federal requirements may act as a barrier to the development or rehabilitation of housing, and affordable housing in particular. These include State prevailing wage requirements, Article 34 of the State Constitution and environmental review requirements. State Prevailing Wage Requirements The State Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) expanded the kinds of projects that require the payment of prevailing wages. Labor Code Section 1720, which applies prevailing wage rates to public works of over $1,000, now defines public works to mean construction, alteration, installation, demolition, or repair work done under contract and paid for in whole or in part out of public funds. For example, public transfer of an asset for less than fair market value, such as a land write-down, would now be construed to be paid for, in part, out of public funds and trigger prevailing wage requirements. While the cost differential in prevailing and standard wages varies based on the skill level of the occupation, prevailing wages tend to add to the overall cost of development. In the case of affordable housing projects, prevailing wage requirements could effectively reduce the number of affordable units that can be achieved with public subsidies. The following types of projects are exempt from the prevailing wage requirement: • Residential projects financed through issuance of bonds that receive an allocation through the State; or • Single-family projects financed through issuance of qualified mortgage revenue bonds or mortgage credit certificates. 18 California court cases (City of Santa Barbara v. Adamson, 1980 and City of Chula Vista v. Pagard, 1981, etc.) have ruled an ordinance as invalid if it defines a"family"as(a)an individual; (b)two or more persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption;or(c)a group of not more than a specific number of unrelated persons as a single housekeeping unit. These cases have explained that defining a family in a manner that distinguishes between blood-related and non-blood related individuals does not serve any legitimate or useful objective or purpose recognized under the zoning and land use planning powers of a municipality, and therefore violates rights of privacy under the California Constitution. Appendix C-62 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Article 34 of the California Constitution Article 34 of the State Constitution requires a majority vote of the electorate to approve the development, construction, or acquisition by a public body of any "low rent housing project" within that jurisdiction. In other words, for any projects to be built and/or operated by a public agency where at least 50 percent of the occupants are low income and rents are restricted to affordable levels, the jurisdiction must seek voter approval known as "Article 34 authority" to authorize that number of units. Dublin has not sought voter approval to grant "Article 34 authority." In the past, Article 34 may have prevented certain projects from being built. In practice, most public agencies have learned how to structure projects to avoid triggering Article 34, such as limiting public assistance to 49 percent of the units in the project. Furthermore, the State legislature has enacted Sections 37001, 37001.3, and 37001.5 of the Health and Safety Code to clarify ambiguities relating to the scope of the applicability of Article 34. Although Dublin does not have Article 34 authority, the City does not view this as a significant constraint to the development of affordable housing since the City does not typically function as a developer. Environmental Protection State and federal regulations require environmental review of proposed discretionary projects (e.g., subdivision maps, development review permits, etc.). Costs resulting from the environmental review process are also added to the cost of housing and are passed on to the consumer to the extent that the market can bear. These costs include fees charged by local government and private consultants needed to complete the environmental analysis, and from delays caused by the mandated public review periods. However, the presence of these regulations helps preserve the environment and ensure environmental safety to Dublin residents. D. Utility and Public Service Constraints The provision of utilities such as water and sewer as well as public services including police, fire, and schools is costly to local governments and special districts providing municipal services. New development must pay for much of these costs thereby increasing the overall cost of housing. This section provides an overview of potential utility and public service constraints in Dublin. Water Supply and Distribution Dublin's water is distributed by Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD), which purchases water from Zone 7 of the Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, which, in turn, imports it from three sources: State water project, local runoff from the Arroyo Del Valle watershed (stored in Lake Del Valle) and from natural recharge of the groundwater basin. A recent United States District Court decision mandated a 35 percent reduction in pumping from the Sacramento Delta to protect the endangered Delta Smelt. As a result of this mandated reduction, alternative measures to conserve existing and secure additional water supply will be necessary. The largest categorical consumer of water is residential users, and more specifically, single-family residential users. Although the total water demand over the past 10 years has increased for the single-family residential category, the total number of single-family households Appendix C-63 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) has increased at a greater rate than the total water demand rate. Therefore, the average annual consumption of a single family household has decreased from 140,700 gallons per year in 2002 to 117,200 gallons per year in 2012, according to the DSRSD. This 16-percent decrease in the average household consumption is due to many factors, including a greater use of water efficient features, installation of more water-efficient landscapes, and greater public education regarding the importance of water conservation. DSRSD has a comprehensive Water Conservation Program in place that includes both supply- and demand-side measures, including audits, incentives, optimal management practices, enforcing wastewater and landscape regulations, education programs, support activities, metering, and pipe replacement. The City of Dublin also currently utilizes several means to promote water conservation and efficiency in new development: • Implementation of Chapter 8.88 of the Municipal Code (Water Efficient Landscape Regulations) which requires that development projects of a certain size and scope be designed with landscape materials and maintenance that is sensitive to reducing water use. Chapter 8.88 conforms to the state mandate to either have a local Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance or require that new projects conform to the statewide Water Efficient Landscape requirements. • Implementation of Chapter 7.94 of the Municipal Code (Dublin Green Building Code), with the purpose of enhancing the design and construction of buildings and encouraging sustainable construction practices in several categories including water efficiency and conservation. • Participation and collaboration with outside organizations and agencies on programs to educate the public and provide hands-on assistance to increase water conservation efforts. Senate Bill 1087 (enacted 2006) requires that water providers develop written policies that grant priority to proposed development that includes housing affordable to lower-income households. The legislation also prohibits water providers from denying or conditioning the approval of development that includes housing affordable to lower income households, unless specific written findings are made. The City will provide a copy of the adopted 2015-2023 Housing Element to DSRSD within 30 days of adoption. The City will also continue to coordinate with the DSRSD to ensure affordable housing developments receive priority water service provision. Sewage Collection and Treatment The Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) is the purveyor of wastewater collection and treatment services in the City of Dublin. The wastewater collection system includes over 170 miles of sanitary sewers ranging from six to forty-two inches in diameter that are from five to over forty years old. Disposal of treated wastewater is under the jurisdiction of the Livermore- Amador Valley Water Management Authority (LAVWMA). Wastewater collected from the DSRSD service area travels by gravity to the DSRSD wastewater treatment plant which is located in the City of Pleasanton. The plant has a rated dry-weather capacity of 17.0 million gallons per day (mgd). Disposal of treated effluent from the treatment plant in Pleasanton is provided by the Livermore-Amador Valley Water Management Agency (LAVWMA) who exports secondary treated wastewater to the East Bay Dischargers Authority interceptor pipeline for ultimate discharge to the San Francisco Bay via a deep-water outfall. LAVWMA facilities are designed to export a maximum flow of 41.2 mgd during wet weather events. Appendix C-64 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Senate Bill 1087 described above also mandates priority sewage collection and treatment service to housing developments providing units affordable to lower income households. The City will continue to coordinate with DSRSD to ensure priority service provision to affordable housing developments. Fire Protection The Alameda County Fire Department (ACFD) serves as the fire department for the City of Dublin and provides all fire prevention, fire protection and First Responder Emergency Medical Services, including advanced life support (paramedics), within the City. The ACFD has identified the need to modernize its fleet and make staffing adjustments to adequately serve future development while maintaining current service levels to existing development. Schools The Dublin Unified School District (DUSD) provides public education in the City of Dublin. DUSD currently operates elementary, middle and high schools in the Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas. At build-out of the General Plan, which is expected to occur in 2035, DUSD estimates a student enrollment of 9,755 students. E. Environmental Constraints A community's environmental setting affects the feasibility and cost of developing housing. Environmental issues range from the conservation of biological resources to the suitability of land for development due to potential exposure to seismic, flooding, wildfire and other hazards. This section summarizes these potential constraints in Dublin. (Refer to the Conservation Element, Seismic Safety and Safety Element, and the Schools, Public Lands, and Utilities Element of the General Plan for more detailed analyses and mitigating policies that address environmental issues or hazards within the Dublin planning area.) Biological Resources Dublin's Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas are located within Livermore Drainage Unit which is one of two major drainage basins in the Alameda Creek Watershed. Of the many streams in the Livermore Drainage Unit, two flow through Dublin's Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas — Alamo Creek and Tassajara Creek, respectively. Portions of these creeks have been channelized and remaining sections are being improved as a result of subdivision developments. The Western Extended Planning Area lies within the San Lorenzo Creek Watershed and includes the Palomares Creek and Dublin Creek sub-watersheds. Several significant streams traverse the Western Extended Planning Area including Hollis Canyon and Martin Canyon Creeks in the western hills. Extensive areas of riparian vegetation are located along stream courses in the Western Extended Planning Area. This riparian woodland has importance to wildlife in the area. Considerable damage to riparian areas has resulted from intensive grazing. Oak woodland is another sensitive habitat community located in Dublin. Most of the oak woodland that can be found in Dublin is concentrated in the Western Extended Planning Area. In addition to California live oaks, other species such as bay, laurel and California buckeye are a vital part of this plant community. The City emphasizes preservation of oak woodland in the Western Extended Planning Area. Development should be clustered in grassland areas Appendix C-65 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) wherever possible to protect existing trees. However, as part of comprehensive planning for development in this area, some oak woodland may need to be removed. Removal of oaks is allowed only after all feasible site planning efforts have been made to preserve trees. Heritage Tree Preservation Heritage trees, defined as any oak, bay, cypress, maple, redwood, buckeye, and sycamore tree having a trunk or main stem of 24 inches or more in diameter or any other tree required to be preserved as part of a discretionary entitlement, are protected by City ordinance. Removal of heritage trees requires a permit upon finding that the tree presents a public safety risk, removal is necessary for reasonable development of property, does not increase erosion or stream water flow potential, or would not otherwise affect neighborhood aesthetics. Seismic Hazards The Calaveras Fault is the major active fault in the planning area with rupture potential and runs parallel to and just west of San Ramon Road. The Pleasanton Fault, located near the west edge of Camp Parks, is difficult to locate precisely. The State has established Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones along both faults, requiring detailed studies of rupture hazards prior to construction. Few potential building sites within the City of Dublin or the extended planning area are without geologic impact or hazard. The hazard may be actual, such as an active landslide or proximity to an active fault, or potential, such as a proposed cut that might activate a landslide. Mitigation of hazards may increase construction cost, but will reduce long-term costs to both property owners and the City. Fire Hazards Steep, inaccessible slopes and brush create a high fire hazard in the western hills. Additionally, areas within the Extended Planning Areas that are adjacent to open space are susceptible to fire hazards. For projects that are constructed outside a fire station service area (greater than 1.5 miles from the nearest fire station) and/or interface with open space, certain built-in fire protection measures will be necessary. For example, sprinklers are required for all habitable structures beyond five minutes response time from a station. A fire protection buffer zone may also be required around the perimeter of residential development situated adjacent to undeveloped open space land. Furthermore, the City enforces its Fire Safe Roof and Spark Arrestor ordinances for development proposed near high fire hazard areas. These measures may increase the cost of new housing in vulnerable areas; however, the added protection is necessary to ensure public health, safety, and welfare. Flooding Both 100 and 500 year flood zones have been identified in portions of the Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas; no 100 year or 500 year flood zones have been identified in the Western Extended Planning Area. Most of the areas in the 100 year flood plain have been built upon. Any new construction in flood prone areas must comply with Chapter 7.24 (Flood Control) of Title 7 of the Dublin Municipal Code including constructing the first floor above the floodplain level. A number of channel improvements have been implemented since the early 1990's as a result of local developments partnering with Zone 7 and/or the City of Dublin, and Caltrans transportation projects. Appendix C-66 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Channel improvements have been made along Tassajara Creek (Line K), Alamo Creek (Line F), and Big Canyon Creek (Line J-1). In addition to the major creeks in Dublin, several tributaries have undergone improvements as well, including the undergrounding of Line G-3 and the channel wall-raising of Line G-5. While no major flood improvement projects have clearly been identified in the City of Dublin for the future, Zone 7 is presently working on an update to their Stream Management Master Plan (SMMP), which will consider new, innovative approaches to providing regional flood protection, including options that may include the use of enhanced floodplains and vegetated stormwater channels. Areas along Chabot Canal located in Camp Parks and upland areas along Tassajara Creek will likely present partnering opportunities for Zone 7 and the City of Dublin. Portions of the Downtown Specific Plan area fall within the flood plains of 100-year, 500-year, and Zone X. The EIR for the Downtown Specific Plan Amendment determines no significant impact will result as projects would be required to comply with floodplain regulations. While compliance with such regulations would add to the cost of development, it has not constrained housing development in the Downtown as evidenced by the projects already entitled in the area. Specifically, the Crown Chevy Redevelopment Site has recently been approved for 314 multi- family apartment units over 17,000 square feet of ground floor commercial and 72 affordable rental units for veterans. The City also continues to receive interest in residential development Downtown. The Downtown Specific Plan amendment approved on July 15, 2014 is designed to accommodate this interest. Appendix C-67 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 3. Housing Resources This section evaluates the resources available in Dublin for the development and preservation of housing. A. Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) State law (California Government Code Section 65584) provides for councils of governments to prepare regional housing allocation plans that assign a share of a region's housing construction need to each city and county. In the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) is the council of governments authorized under State law to identify existing and future housing needs for the region. ABAG adopted a new regional housing allocation plan on July 18, 2013. This "Regional Housing Needs Assessment" (RHNA) covers the planning period from January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022. Existing need is evaluated based on overpayment (30 percent or more of income), overcrowding by lower income households, and the need to raise vacancy rates in the jurisdiction to a level at which the market would operate freely. The housing assessment also includes an impaction correction to reduce the further concentration of lower income households in jurisdictions that already have more than the regional average of such households. ABAG's methodology is based on the regional growth estimates developed by the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). These are "planning goals" and are not meant to match, and often exceed, anticipated housing production. The planning goals developed by HCD are provided to ABAG in the form of regional housing goals, divided into income categories. ABAG is responsible for allocating the RHNA goals to cities and counties in the Bay Area. The RHNA is a minimum needs number—jurisdictions are free to plan for, and accommodate, a larger number of dwelling units than the allocation. The jurisdiction must, however, identify adequate sites at appropriate zoning and development standards to accommodate its RHNA. While the jurisdiction must also show how it will facilitate and encourage the development of these units, it is not obligated to build any of the units itself or finance their construction. According to the RHNA, the City of Dublin has a total housing construction need of 2,285 units. Table C-34 shows Dublin's 2014-2022 planning period allocation. The City must accommodate these units either through production of units or provision of adequate sites that can accommodate these units. Specifically, for facilitating the development of lower income units, the State has established a default density of 30 units per acre. Appendix C-68 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-34: Regional Housing Needs Assessment (2014-2022) Income Level Dwelling Units %of Total Extremely Low/Very Low-Income' 796 34.8% Low-Income 446 19.5% Moderate-Income 425 18.6% Above-Moderate-Income 618 27.0% Total 2,285 100.0% Source:ABAG Regional Housing Needs Assessment Note 1:AB 2634 amending the Housing Element law requires local jurisdictions project its future housing needs for extremely low income households(0-30 percent AMI). Specifically, State law provides two methodologies for estimating the extremely low income needs —either by splitting the very low income category evenly between extremely low(0-30 percent AMI)and very low(31-50 percent AMI)incomes;or to apportion the very low income category based on Census data. The 796 very low income RHNA units can be split into 398 extremely low(50 percent)and 398 very low(50 percent)income units. B. Credits a-gainst the RHNA Approved Projects As the RHNA is for the planning period of January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022, housing units approved but not yet constructed as of January 1, 2014 can be credited toward the RHNA. As of February 2014, seven projects have been approved in the City but not yet constructed. These recent development activities in the City have been primarily lower and medium density developments, and most opted to pay a fee in-lieu of including affordable units on site. One project — the Crown Chevy redevelopment site (formerly known as the Kingsmill project) - fulfills its affordable housing requirement by providing a 1.37-acre parcel to Eden Housing to develop up to 76- apartments for low income households. At least 38 units will be reserved for returning veterans who have been severely injured. The remaining 38 units will be set aside for low income families with a preference for families of veterans. Project Very Low Low Moderate Above Total Moderate Crown Chevy/Kingsmill 0 0 0 314 314 Veteran Housing 0 76 0 0 76 AMB/Prologis 0 0 0 1 310 310 Nielsen 0 0 0 36 36 Transit Center E-1 0 0 0 105 105 Moller Ranch 0 0 0 370 370 Dublin Ranch North 1 0 1 0 0 4 4 Total 0 1 76 0 1 1,139 1,215 Appendix C-69 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Remaining RHNA Based on units approved, the City has already met a portion of its RHNA obligations. Specifically, the City has met its requirement for the above moderate income RHNA, with a remaining RHNA of 1,591 lower and moderate income units (see Table C-35). Table C-35: Remaining RHNA Extremely/ Low Moderate Above Total Very Low Moderate RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Units Approved 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Remaining RHNA 1 796 1 370 425 0 1,591 C. Future Development Potential Vacant Sites Vacant residential properties in the City can accommodate a maximum of 1,620 units based on maximum permitted densities (Table C-36). However, based on the recent trend of development proposals averaging closer toward the mid-point densities, the more realistic estimate of development potential is 965 units. Appendix C-70 C " •a+ H C C C �_' C 7 C C C D co co U E E E U 'C co U U K M 07 m 0) 7 O m O M O- m m (0 LU > > > 2 (n U— 2 > Q c0 > > > � N _ O ++ O C) C) C) O O O 't CD O Q N y O (h 06 06 C6 O O O O O N N O U a C) O Q T U w K O O O O O O O O O O @ C M �' Lo 117 11) Y Z! 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L w o C ania VONJIN4 F aLL am IL H 9 IA d a Y e .+ C 6 a N {Q V a n o f N +G a C N > U J b2b3�S W T i a coACH 2 a � yo M o ao U 2 IL City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan combined the area of the former Downtown Core Specific Plan, Dublin Downtown Specific Plan, San Ramon Road Specific Plan, Village Parkway Specific Plan, and West Dublin BART Specific Plan into one comprehensive plan (Figure C-9). This plan was approved by the Dublin City Council on February 1, 2011. Existing uses in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are characterized by commercial and office uses with large surface parking spaces. Existing vacancies and underutilization of land are evident throughout the Specific Plan area. The City amended the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan on July 15, 2014 to increase residential development opportunities in the area and distribute this potential development across three districts: • Retail District: Comprised of mostly regional serving large-format retailers bounded by Amador Valley Boulevard, 1-680, Dublin Boulevard and San Ramon Road. After the 2014 amendment, the Specific Plan now allows for up to 400 residential units in the Retail District. • Transit-Oriented District: Comprised of land south of Dublin Boulevard and within walking distance to the West Dublin BART Station. After the 2014 amendment, the Specific Plan now allows for up to 1,900 residential units in the Transit-Oriented District; to date, 1,009 units have been entitled, leaving a remaining residential development potential of 891 units. • Village Parkway District: Comprised of retail and service-oriented businesses along both sides of Village Parkway. After the 2014 amendment, the Specific Plan now allows for up to 200 residential units in the Village Parkway District. Appendix C-73 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-9: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan LEGEND "`t . SpwlAc P6n 8oundory Gh Limit Lin* Spec ft Plan DkMas t x R*wl District `1168*FbK ov D'ohtd l City of Pleosanton The City amended the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan on July 15, 2014 to increase residential development opportunities in the area and distribute potential development across three districts. The amended Specific Plan allows for 300 additional units in the Retail District (400 units total), 800 additional units in the Transit-Oriented District (1,900 units total), and 100 additional units in the Village Parkway District(200 units total). With the amendment, a total of 2,500 residential units can be permitted in the Specific Plan area. About 1,009 of the 1,900 units in the Transit-Oriented district have already been entitled. Connelly Station completed construction in March 2014 and includes 309 apartment units. In March 2013, the City approved the redevelopment of the Crown Chevy site for 314 residential units—with 17,000 square feet of ground floor retail. An additional 76-unit affordable housing development for military veterans was also approved as part of the project. A third project, now referred to as Prologis, was approved in 2004; but, due to delays as a result of the economic downturn, is only now being actively marketed. The project includes 310 high density units and 150,000 square feet of office space. As amended, the Transit Oriented District now has a remaining capacity of 891 units. The Transit-Oriented district sites in the residential sites inventory were selected based on their existing conditions (high vacancy and turnover rates), low Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of existing buildings on site compared to allowable FAR, and developer interests. These sites are very similar in characteristics to sites that have recently been redeveloped or entitled in this district, indicating their suitability for redevelopment. Appendix C-74 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The EIR certified Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Amendment has adequately analyzed the potential impacts of future development within the Specific Plan area. No additional environmental review is required for development projects that are consistent with the Specific Plan. Development applications would be subject to site plan and design review. Table C-37: Amendment to Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Previous Amended District Density Dwelling Units Density Dwelling Units Retail 0.35 FAR 100 22.0 du/ac(min) 400 Transit-Oriented 85.0 du/acre 1,100 30.0 du/ac(min) 1,900 Village Parkway 15.0 du/acre 100 15.0 du/ac(max) 200 Total i 1,300 1 1 2,500 As part of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan amendment and this Housing Element update, City staff conducted a parcel-specific vacant and underutilized sites analysis to identify properties with near-term development potential within the three districts. Factors considered included: • Developer interest • Existing vacancies and availability of space for lease • Properties available for sale • Age of existing structures • Deferred maintenance • Existing Floor Area Ratio (FAR) compared to allowable FAR • Size of property and lot consolidation potential If these properties were to be redeveloped according to the proposed allowable densities, up to 408 units may be achieved in the Retail District, 1,679 units in the TOD District, and 488 units in the Village Parkway District, for a total capacity of 2,679 units. However, given the residential development potential established in each district, only about half of the capacity is used to fulfill the RHNA. (A detailed sites inventory is included in Appendix D.) Density and Affordability State Housing Element law establishes a default density of 30 units per acre for communities in Alameda County with a population over 25,000 as being adequate to facilitate and encourage the development of lower income housing. However, this default density is not a mandate and local jurisdictions can use alternative density thresholds to measure feasibility for lower income housing based on a demonstrated history. City staff researched recent affordable housing projects in the Greater Tri-Valley region and concluded that affordable housing for lower income households can be achieved at a density between 20 and 25 units per acre (Table C-38). The City had also previously contacted EAH, developer of Camellia Place at the Dublin Transit Center. The representative of EAH commented that affordable housing can be achieved in Dublin at a density of around 22 units per acre. At this density, it is feasible to develop two-three story walkup apartments at a reasonable level of subsidies. Appendix C-75 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Based on the affordable housing projects in the Greater Tri-Valley area, this Housing Element uses 22 units per acre as a density threshold for measuring feasibility for lower income housing. Specifically because the Retail District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan requires a minimum density of 22 units per acre, 75 percent of the development potential in this district is credited toward the lower income RHNA. Development potential in the TOD District, with a minimum density of 30 units per acre, defaults to the lower income level of affordability. Table C-38: Greater Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Projects Project Name City Total Affordable Affordability Level Unit Type Density Units Units du/ac Anderson Dublin 108 88 Lower and Moderate Apartment 15.4 Wicklow Square Dublin 57 57 Very Low Apartment 19.4 Emerald Vista Dublin 180 178 Lower Apartment/Senior 17 Kingsmill Dublin 76 76 Lower Apartment/ 53 Veteran Quail Ridge Danville 13 7 Very Low Apartment 21 Valley Vista San Ramon 105 105 Lower Apartment/Senior 22 Seville San Ramon 165 165 Lower Apartment 25 Highland Point San Ramon 293 293 Lower and Moderate Apartment 25 Valencia San Ramon 186 186 Lower and Moderate Apartment 24 Carmen Avenue I Livermore 30 29 Very Low Apartment 29 For projects to be developed in the Medium Density (6.1-14.0 units per acre) and Medium- High Density (14.1-25.0 units per acre) categories, the City evaluated the affordability level on a site-by-site basis. For sites that are most likely to be developed as single-family homes, these sites are credited toward meeting the City's above moderate income RHNA. For sites that are most likely to be developed as attached multi-family development (such as condominiums and townhomes), these sites are used to fulfill the City's moderate income RHNA. Adequacy of Sites Inventory The City's remaining residential sites and sites in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area, along with approved projects, have the potential to accommodate up to 3,671 units. Overall, the available sites/approved units total 1,367 lower income units, 448 moderate income units, and 1,856 above moderate income units (see Table C-39), adequate to meet the City's RHNA for the planning period. Appendix C-76 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-39: Summary of Sites Inventory and Remaining RHNA Extremely Above Low/ Low Moderate Moderate Total Very Low RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Units Approved 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Sites Capacity Vacant Residential Sites 0 448 517 965 Downtown Dublin SP Retail 400 0 0 400 TOD' 891 0 0 891 Village Parkway 0 0 200 200 Surplus/(Shortfall) +125 +23 +1,238 1 +1,386 Note 1: Represents 891 units in remaining residential development potential in this district. Infrastructure Capacity According to the Dublin San Ramon Services District Water Master Plan (2005), the Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) currently serves the Central Dublin, Eastern Dublin, and Camp Parks area. The District's service area will encompass approximately 27 square miles and is projected to include build out of the existing service areas plus the Western Dublin and Dougherty Valley planning areas. Build out is estimated at 78,260 residents by 2020. Due to the recent economic recession and depressed housing market, buildout of the service area has delayed. For example, current (2012 American Community Survey) population in Dublin is estimated at 45,800, well below the projected 2015 population of 50,320, or 10,320 residents below the projected population by 2020. The City has a RHNA of 2,285 units through 2023. Prorating this RHNA for the planning period of the master plan yields an additional 1,430 units. At an average household size of 2.7 persons per household, the additional units would yield 3,860 additional residents in Dublin, well below the projected buildout provided for in the water plan. Therefore, projected water services capacity is adequate to accommodate the City's RHNA. The Dublin San Ramon Service District also provides wastewater collection and treatment services to the City of Dublin in Alameda County and portions of the City of San Ramon in Contra Costa County. The District's wastewater service area is smaller than the water service area (wastewater service to the northern portion of San Ramon and to the Dougherty Valley is provided by the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District). The DSRSD wastewater collection system includes over 107 miles of sanitary sewers from 6 to 42 inches in diameter. The ages of the sewers range from less than 5 to over 40 years old. The DSRSD Wastewater Collection System Master Plan Update (February 2000) states that there are eight improvement projects recommend providing the required capacity in the District's wastewater collection system. All necessary capital improvements were completed by 2003 to serve future growth. Appendix C-77 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) D. Financial Resources Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee As a small city, the City of Dublin has very limited access to financial resources for affordable housing. The significant resource for the City is the Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee. The City adopted an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance in 2002 to assure that housing development contributes to the attainment of the City's housing goals by increasing the production of residential units affordable by households of very low, low, and moderate incomes. Upon request, the City Council can allow the applicant to pay a fee in-lieu of constructing the affordable units that the developer would otherwise be required to construct. In-lieu fees are placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. The In-Lieu Fee is primarily used to support the construction of affordable housing units. The City also approved a Commercial Linkage Fee on May 3, 2005. Fees are charged to non-residential developments, based on the square footage and type of commercial building space and placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. As of April 2014, the City's Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund has a balance of $7,013,816. The funds are to be used for the following activities: • Affordable housing construction loans; • First Time Homebuyer Loan Program; • Homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services; • Rental assistance programs; • Housing Division's administrative costs; and • Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) CDBG is the largest federal housing-related program for affordable housing. It is a "pass- through" program that allows local governments to use federal funds to alleviate poverty and blight. Cities with populations of over 50,000 receive CDBG funds directly from HUD, while smaller cities usually use county-administered CDBG funds. HUD makes allocations based on a formula that takes population, poverty, and housing distress into account. CDBG funds are used for a variety of housing efforts including activities aimed at reducing costs for private development (helping fund site acquisition, improvement, and other soft costs); housing acquisition and rehabilitation through short and long-term loans, grants or loan guarantees; direct payment of rent or mortgage and housing counseling services; and fair housing activities. CDBG funds are best used in combination with other subsidy sources or to provide pre-development funding to initiate housing development. As a small city, the City of Dublin does not qualify to receive CDBG funds directly from HUD. However, it participates in the County of Alameda CDBG program. The County offers the Home Improvement Program for Dublin residents using CDBG funds. Appendix C-78 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) E. Administrative Resources The Bay Area is fortunate to have a large number of successful non-profit and for-profit housing developers who have produced thousands of high-quality, well-managed affordable housing projects for lower and moderate income households. Collectively, they have produced multi-family developments, single-family developments, rental and ownership opportunities, sweat-equity developments, mixed income projects, mixed use developments, and housing that is specifically designed to meet the needs of seniors, disabled persons, farm workers, female-headed households, people with substance abuse problems, and/or homeless persons. Active affordable housing developers in the region include Resources for Community Development, Satellite Housing, East Bay Habitat for Humanity, Eden Housing, East Bay Housing Organizations, ECHO Housing, and BRIDGE Housing Corporation, among others. The City of Dublin also achieves affordable housing through its Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance. 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L O co O mN M CO N Ld N N N CD L O M O O � O O O C Q O O O O N L? X C Q Q w w w w w w w w W w Q > > > > > > > > > > CO ti Cn M M LO W) rt 01 M U"> rl- M CO cO Lo r- CC) O co O O O O O 3 toco wwwcocor m � U cu as 0 O D C C a •n _ m c V 4 N N L cn CD 0 Gs E 3 0 o CL a N „ m v N N . o N C 2 d cn U > > O O O O O O N 0 0 Q O O O O O O O O O O C N N Cl N O O M M CO , 3 = O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 p y Z - o C5 0 6 6 6 0 0 6 r 3 p ea 'L =° a v rn m m m m m v m v m o D rn rn F- RESOLUTION NO. 14-XX A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING CITY COUNCIL ADOPTION OF A NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and adopted within 120 days of the statutory deadline of January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared; and WHEREAS, the City prepared a Negative Declaration dated September 2014 for the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) (the "Project") which reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis of the potential environmental impacts of the Project. The Negative Declaration, including its supporting Initial Study, is attached as Exhibit B and incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, the Negative Declaration was circulated from September 12, 2014 through October 13, 2014 (30 days) for public comment; and WHEREAS, no public comments were received on the Negative Declaration; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated October 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, was submitted to the City of Dublin Planning Commission recommending City Council adoption of the Negative Declaration and adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a public hearing on the Project on October 28, 2014-land WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hear and consider the Negative Declaration, all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the Project; and Attachment 6 WHEREAS, the location and custodian of the documents or other material which constitute the record of proceedings for the project is the City of Dublin Community Development Department, City Hall, 100 Civic Plaza, Dublin, CA 94568. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City of Dublin Planning Commission hereby recommends the City Council find that: 1) The foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. 2) On the basis of the whole record before it, there is no substantial evidence that the project will have a significant effect on the environment. 3) The Negative Declaration is complete and adequate and reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis as to the environmental effects of the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) as described in the Negative Declaration. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that on the basis of the findings above, the City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend City Council adoption of the attached resolution adopting a Negative Declaration for the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023). PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 28th day of October 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chair ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director G.IPM20131PLPA-2013-00031 Housing Element Update 2015-2023110.28.14 PC MeetinglAtt 6—PC Reso ND.docx 2 of 2 RESOLUTION NO. XX - 14 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN ADOPTING A NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City, and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and adopted within 120 days of the statutory deadline of January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared; and WHEREAS, the City prepared a Negative Declaration dated September 2014 for the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) (the "Project") which reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis of the potential environmental impacts of the Project. The Negative Declaration, including its supporting Initial Study, is attached as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, the Negative Declaration was circulated from September 12, 2014 through October 13, 2014 (30 days) for public comment; and WHEREAS, no public comments were received on the Negative Declaration; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated October 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, was submitted to the City of Dublin Planning Commission recommending City Council adoption of the Negative Declaration and adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a properly noticed public hearing on the project on October 28, 2014 and adopted Resolution 14-XX recommending City Council adoption of the Negative Declaration, which resolution is incorporated herein by reference, and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated , 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, was submitted to the City of Dublin City Council recommending adoption of the Negative Declaration and adoption of a General Plan Amendment for the 2015-2023 Housing Element; and EXHIBIT A TO Attachment 6 WHEREAS, the City Council held a public hearing on the project on , 2014; and WHEREAS, proper notice of said hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and consider the Negative Declaration, all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the project; and WHEREAS, the location and custodian of the documents or other material which constitute the record of proceedings for the project is the City of Dublin Community Development Department, City Hall, 100 Civic Plaza, Dublin, CA 94568. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City of Dublin City Council does hereby find that: 1) The foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. 2) On the basis of the whole record before it, there is no substantial evidence that the project will have a significant effect on the environment. 3) The Negative Declaration is complete and adequate and reflects the City's independent judgment and analysis as to the environmental effects of the General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) as described in the Negative Declaration. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that on the basis of the findings above, the City of Dublin City Council does hereby adopt a Negative Declaration for the 2015-2023 Housing Element, attached as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this _day of , 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Mayor ATTEST: City Clerk General Plan Housing Element (2015-2023) INITIAL ST UDYI NEGATIVE DECLARATION Lead Agency: City of Dublin Prepared By: Jerry Haag, Urban Planner September,2014 Exhibit B Attachment 6 Table of Contents Introduction...................................................................................................................2 ProjectSponsor & Contact..........................................................................................2 Project Location and Context......................................................................................2 ProjectDescription........................................................................................................3 Environmental Factors Potentially Affected.............................................................11 Determination................................................................................................................11 Evaluation of Environmental Impacts.......................................................................13 Discussionof Checklist ................................................................................................26 1. Aesthetics ...............................................................................................26 2. Agricultural & Forestry Resources.....................................................29 3. Air Quality/Greenhouse Gas Analysis .............................................30 4. Biological Resources .............................................................................31 5. Cultural Resources................................................................................33 6. Geology and Soils .................................................................................34 7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions..................................................................36 8. Hazards and Hazardous Materials ....................................................38 9. Hydrology and Water Quality............................................................38 10. Land Use and Planning........................................................................43 11. Mineral Resources.................................................................................43 12. Noise .......................................................................................................44 13. Population and Housing......................................................................46 14. Public Services.......................................................................................46 15. Recreation...............................................................................................48 16. Transportation/Traffic.........................................................................48 17. Utilities and Service Systems...............................................................51 18. Mandatory Findings of Significance ..................................................53 InitialStudy Preparers .................................................................................................54 Agencies and Organizations Consulted ....................................................................54 References ......................................................................................................................54 List of Exhibits Exhibit 1: Regional Context.............................................................................. Exhibit 2: City of Dublin Context ...............................................................................7 Exhibit 3: Housing Opportunity Sites........................................................................8 City of Dublin Environmental Checklist/ Initial Study Introduction This Initial Study has been prepared in accord with the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and assesses the potential environmental impacts of implementing the proposed project described below. The Initial Study consists of a completed environmental checklist and a brief explanation of the environmental topics addressed in the checklist. Project Sponsor & Contact Person City of Dublin Community Development Department 100 Civic Plaza Dublin CA 94568 (925) 833 6610 Attn: Marnie Delgado, Senior Planner Project Location and Context The City of Dublin consists of approximately 14.9 square miles of land area lying in eastern Alameda County, also known as the Livermore-Amador Valley, or the Tri- Valley area. Surrounding jurisdictions include San Ramon and unincorporated Contra Costa County to the north, unincorporated Alameda County to the east and west and the cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to the south. Major features in the community include the I-580 freeway, which forms the southern boundary of Dublin and the I-680 freeway that extends in a north south direction just east of downtown Dublin. The City is also served by the Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART), with two stations: the Dublin/Pleasanton station and the West Dublin station. Exhibit 1 shows the location of Dublin in relation to surrounding communities and other major features. Topographically, the community is generally flat north of the I-580 corridor, transitioning to rolling hillsides in the northern, eastern and western portions of Dublin. Major land uses comprising Dublin include the commercial downtown area north of the I-580 freeway generally located between San Ramon Road and Village Parkway with predominantly low density, single-family dwellings surrounding the City of Dublin Page 2 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 downtown area. Parks Reserve Forces Training Area (RFTA, also known as Camp Parks) is located in the approximate center of Dublin and is used for military training purposes. Approximately 189 acres along the southern portion of Parks RFTA was recently transferred to a private party and a Specific Plan has been approved on this portion of the military facility, known as Dublin Crossings. The newest developing portion of Dublin is Eastern Dublin, consisting of approximately 4,200 acres of land located east of Parks RFTA, north of I-580, south of the Alameda County-Contra Costa County line and west of the unincorporated Doolan Canyon area. Eastern Dublin has been urbanizing since adoption of the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan in 1993 and the area now contains a mix of single-family dwellings, multiple-family dwellings, commercial, parks, schools, open spaces and government facility land uses. Completion of the Dublin/Pleasanton Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station has facilitated development of high-density housing complexes in this portion of Dublin. In 2011, the Dublin City Council adopted the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan to encourage higher intensity residential development in this portion of the community as well as more pedestrian-friendly retail and other uses. Project Description Background. The proposed project includes the adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element of the Dublin General Plan. The State of California has mandated that all local.jurisdictions within the Bay Area have approved current Housing Elements to reflect current "fair share" housing allocations for each City and County. The State Housing and Community Development Department (HCD) will review all Housing Elements to determine compliance with State Law governing the content of these Elements. Housing Elements are legal documents, included within a community's General Plan, that identify housing conditions, provide an assessment of housing needs during the planning period, identify housing resources, opportunities and constraints and establish policies, programs and quantified housing objectives to achieve housing needs. Housing Goals. The proposed 2015-2023 Housing Element maintains many of the goals and policies that have been adopted as part of the current Housing Element. Following is a summary of housing goals contained in the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element: Goal A: Expand housing choice and multi-modal transportation opportunities for existing and future Dublin residents. Goal B: Expand housing opportunities for all segments of Dublin's population. Goal C: Use public and private resources to maintain and enhance existing residential neighborhood characteristics. City of Dublin Page 3 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Goal D: Provide housing opportunities for all Dublin residents, regardless of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, age, gender, marital status, family status, disability, source of income, sexual orientation or any other arbitrary factor. Goal E: Promote energy efficiency and conservation throughout Dublin. Each of the above goals includes a number of specific programs intended to achieve these goals. A full description of Housing Element goals and programs are included in the draft City of Dublin 2015-2023 Housing Elenzent (August 2014) which is available at the Dublin Community Development Department during normal business hours. This document is incorporated by reference into this Initial Study. Fair Share Housing. State law mandates that each jurisdiction, in its Housing Element, plan and provide for specific numbers of housing units at different income levels during each Housing Element cycle. For the 2015-2023 Housing Element cycle, the City of Dublin is obligated to provide sites for 2,285 housing units, distributed as shown in Table 1. Table 1 also summarizes the goals for home repair and rehabilitation, rental assistance, home purchase assistance and at-risk housing. Table 1. City of Dublin Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) Income Category Dwelling Home Repair/ Rental Home At-Risk Units Rehabilitation Assistance Purchase Housing Assistance Extremely Low 398 0 0 0 Income Very Low Income 398 16 350 0 0 Low Income 446 16 0 0 Moderate Income 425 0 0 10 0 Above Moderate 618 0 0 10 0 Income Total 2,285 32 350 20 0 Source: Draft City of Dublin 2015-23 Housing Element, August 2014 The draft Housing Element notes that the City of Dublin has approved a number of housing projects prior to January 1, 2014, which, under state law, are counted as partially fulfilling the jurisdiction's regional housing needs. Specifically, approved projects, including the Kingsmill mixed-use project and a 76-unit affordable housing project within Downtown Dublin (also known as the Crown Chevy redevelopment site) and 1,139 above-moderate dwellings in both the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area and the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area provided a total of 1,215 dwellings. Housing opportunity sites. Potential Eastern Dublin housing sites identified in the draft Housing Element to accommodate Dublin's fair share housing obligations are shown in Exhibit 3 with a description of each shown on Table 2. Table 2 indicates that the City could accommodate up to 1,620 dwellings in Eastern Dublin based on anticipated residential densities. City of Dublin Page 4 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 In addition to the housing sites shown on Table 2, a number of housing sites are located in the downtown portion of Dublin, located along Dublin Boulevard, west of the 1-680 freeway, south of Amador Valley Boulevard and east of San Ramon Road. These properties are governed by the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, adopted in 2011 and amended in 2014. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan allows construction of up to 2500 dwellings, of which 1,009 dwellings have been entitled or constructed. No amendments to the Dublin General Plan, any applicable Specific Plan or rezonings are needed to achieve the City's regional housing needs. Table 2. Housing Element Vacant Housing Opportunity Sites No.* Owner Min. Max. Potential Potential Size APN Existing Use Units Units Units Affordability (ac.) 1 Croak 104 692 346 above 115.4 905-0002- vacant moderate 002/ 905- 0002-001- 01 2 Righetti 59 134 77 above 9.6 905- vacant moderate 0001- 005-02 3 Branaugh 59 136 78 above 9.7 905-0001- vacant moderate 004-04 4 Kobold 12 28 16 above 2.0 985-0028- rural home moderate 002 5 McCabe 6 14 10 moderate 1.0 986-0028- single-family 002 home 6 Croak 63 146 104 moderate 10.4 905-0002- vacant 001-01 7 Tipper 50 115 82 moderate 8.2 986-0004- vacant 01 8 Anderson 99 175 108 moderate 7.0 - vacant 9 Beltran 45 80 64 moderate 3.2 vacant S erfsla 10 Chen 56 100 80 moderate 4.0 985-0027- vacant 002 Total 553 1,620 965 1 1 170.5 * See Exhibit 3 for site locations Source: City of Dublin Draft Housing Element, August 2014 All sites in Table 2 are within the Eastern Extended Planning Area. These sites located within the Eastern Dublin Extended Planning Area have been assumed for ultimate urban development in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. A number of sites are located along Tassajara Road, including Sites 4, 5, 7 and 9. These sites are generally smaller in size than sites located further east (Sites 1, 2, 3, 6, 8 and 10) which are characterized by gently rolling hills and some steeper areas. All of the housing opportunity sites are presently designated for urban-level intensity and development in the Dublin General Plan and applicable Specific Plan. Future development of the sites have undergone one or more levels of prior environmental review. The proposed Housing Element anticipates development that could occur under the General Plan, but neither proposes or approves individual development City of Dublin Page 5 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 projects. As in the current Housing Element, the 2015-2023 Housing Element continues to provide a policy and program framework that is receptive to future residential development proposals. The proposed Element also continues to take advantage of currently planned higher densities for transit-oriented development. Implementation of future housing development will generally continue upon application to the City for approval to construct site-specific projects that could be facilitated by the 2015-2023 Housing Element policies and programs. All future development will require the issuance of Site Development Review (SDR) permits by the City of Dublin. The purpose of SDR permits is to ensure compliance with City development and design standards. Other permits may also be required by the City prior to approval of individual housing projects, including but not limited to subdivision maps. At this point, it is unknown which housing opportunity sites will be proposed for development. The background CEQA documents identified later in this Initial Study assume development of the sites, but applications for a particular project site, design, environmental conditions and timing would be under the control of the individual housing developer. Additional CEQA review may be required in the future for individual housing applications submitted on identified sites for review and approval by the City of Dublin. City of Dublin Page 6 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 � SAP! P A B l 0 � Martinez San / Leo Concord C Fla taei Richmond I 5170 Mill tot Valley Walnut z Creek Berkeley O � Q�k San Francisco � AiamP a ' I SAN San Leandro DUBLIN FRANCISCO � a� Sea nay livormoro B A Y rot � Hayward Pleasanton 92 San Mateo Fremont n e, N ewa rk O Redwood City Ha Palo Moon Bay Palo (0 Alto Z' +3 lot sev x ,UO Sunnyvale ySanta Clara San Jose o rat 1 Exhibit 1 REGIONAL LOCATION CITY OF DUBLIN 2015-23 HOUSING ELEMENT UPDATE o z a s 8 10 froes INITIAL STUDY w | \ ± o ! » © / %w , ± a z Z O | .\. U x ^ Fallon R¢ q 2 23 ~2� as %=a r � y P \ - .\y ° Hacienda Dr.: 3.0 - \ / \ � 2 * - ' < . « w Dougherty Rd \ . \ � y U � » ± O ±� O 2 UJI cc © d / \ CO ®^`� z w ■ w � _ w 2z - � . / ƒ \ \ j b 0y ° » L k ®' U \ k �` 0 a +fAltoN.P�P� ULU fog d T '�� � "X,�� °•rye ..i o � ��,,' _%`-r J ref•,;•� ��,��� �'�q a ,O,y�.k `4 ^..� �� y {a t• t g r a r r 0 W O ' + W .{r � '• "Ma�1�3 �� 4)0% U 4 r m Q "top e� 1. Project description: Adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element as part of the Dublin General Plan 2. Lead agency: City of Dublin 3. Contact persons: Marnie Delgado, Senior Planner 4. Project location: City-wide 5. Project sponsor: City of Dublin 6. General Plan designation: Various 7. Zoning: Various S. Other public agency required approvals: Certification by the California Department of Housing and Community Development City of Dublin Page 10 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Environmental Factors Potentially Affected The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this project, involving at least one impact that is a "potentially significant impact" as indicated by the checklist on the following pages. - Aesthetics - Agricultural - Air Quality Resources - Biological - Cultural Resources - Geology/Soils Resources - Hazards and - Hydrology/Water - Land Use/ Hazardous Quality Planning Materials - Mineral Resources - Noise - Population/ Housing - Public Services - Recreation - Transportation/ Circulation - Utilities/Service - Mandatory Systems Findings of Significance Determination (to be completed by Lead Agency): On the basis of this initial evaluation: X I find that the proposed project could not have a significant effect on the environment and a Negative Declaration will be prepared. _I find that although the proposed project could have a significant effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect in this case because the mitigation measures described on an attached sheet have been added to the project. A Mitigated Negative Declaration will be prepared. _I find that although the proposed project may have a significant effect on the environment, but at least one effect 1) has been adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and 2) has been addressed by mitigation measures based on earlier analysis as described on the attached sheets, if the effect is a "potentially significant impact" or "potentially significant unless mitigated." An Environmental Impact Report is required, but must only analyze the effects that remain to be addressed. City of Dublin Page 11 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 I find that although the proposed project could have a significant effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect in this case because all potentially significant effects (a) have been analyzed adequately in an earlier EIR pursuant to applicable standards, and (b) have been avoided or mitigated pursuant to that earlier EIR, including revisions or mitigation measures that are imposed on the proposed project. Signature: Date: Printed Name: k"n For: �-�- City of Dublin Page 12 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Evaluation of Environmental Impacts 1) A brief explanation is required for all answers except "no impact" answers that are adequately supported by the information sources a lead agency cites in the parenthesis following each question. A "no impact" answer is adequately supported if the referenced information sources show that the impact simply does not apply to projects like the one involved (e.g. the project falls outside a fault rupture zone). A "no impact" answer should be explained where it is based on project-specific factors as well as general factors (e.g. the project will not expose sensitive receptors to pollutants, based on a project-specific screening analysis). 2) In some instances, an "LS, Less-than-Significant Impact" response may reflect that a specific environmental topic has been analyzed in a previous CEQA document and appropriate mitigation measures have been included in a previous CEQA document to reduce this impact to a less-than-significant level. In a few instances, some previously analyzed topics were determined to be significant and unavoidable and mitigation of such impact to a less-than- significant level is not feasible. In approving the Eastern Dublin and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan projects , the City of Dublin adopted Statements of Overriding Considerations for the significant unavoidable impacts identified in the respective EIRs. For the proposed 2015-2023 Housing Element update, such environmental impacts have been adequately analyzed and no new impacts would occur. 3) All answers must take account of the whole action, including off-site as well as on-site, cumulative as well as project-level, indirect as well as direct, and construction as well as operational impacts. 4) 'Potentially Significant Impact" is appropriate if there is substantial evidence that an effect is significant. If there are one or more "potentially significant impact" entries when the determination is made, an EIR is required. 5) "Negative Declaration: Less-Than-Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated" implies elsewhere the incorporation of mitigation measures has reduced an effect from "potentially significant effect" to a "less than significant impact." The lead agency must describe the mitigation measures and briefly explain how they reduce the effect to a less than significant level. City of Dublin Page 13 Initial Study/201 5-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Environmental Impacts (Note: Source of determination listed in parenthesis. See listing of sources used to determine each potential impact at the end of the checklist) Earlier Analyses Earlier analyses may be used where, pursuant to tiering, a program EIR, or other CEQA process, one or more effects have been adequately analyzed in an earlier EIR or Negative Declaration. Reference CEQA Guideline Section 15063 (c)(3)(d). Portions of the environmental analysis for this Initial Study refer to information contained in the one or more of the EIRs or NDs listed below. The draft Housing Element does not propose any General Plan or applicable Specific Plan land use changes or any rezoning of properties. The City proposes to meet its RHNA through existing land use and zoning designations. The following environmental review documents assumed these existing designations and/or zoning in their analyses. • Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan EIR (SCH # 91103064, certified by City Council Resolution No. 51-93 on May 10, 1993. This document is also known as the Eastern Dublin EIR in this Initial Study. Multiple Addenda to this EIR have been certified by the City. • Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (SCH# 20100022005), certified by City Council Resolution No. 8-11, adopted February 1, 2011 and the subsequent Addendum certified by City Council Resolution No. 50-14, adopted May 6, 2014. On May 6, 2014, 2014, the City adopted Resolution No. 50-14, approving a CEQA addendum to the 2011 EIR in connection with amendments to increase maximum residential development in the specific plan area to 2500 units. The EIR and addendum are collectively referred to herein as the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan (DDSP) EIR. The related impacts and mitigations for each resource area are briefly summarized in the initial study discussion sections below. The certified EIRs should be consulted for full discussion of the referenced impacts and mitigation measures. These documents are incorporated herein by reference and are available for public review at the Dublin Community Development Department, 100 Civic Plaza, during normal business hours. City of Dublin Page 14 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Environmental Impacts (Note: Source of determination listed in parenthesis. See listing of sources at end of checklist used to determine each potential impact). Note: A full discussion of each item is found Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ following the checklist. Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation 1. Aesthetics. Would the project: a) Have a substantial adverse impact on a scenic X vista? (Source: 1,2) b) Substantially damage scenic resources, including but not limited to trees,rock outcroppings and X historic buildings within a state scenic highway? (Source: 1,2) c) Substantially degrade the existing visual character or quality of the site and its surroundings? X (Source: 1,2) d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare, which would adversely affect day o nighttime X views in the area? (Source: 7) 2. Agricultural Resources. Would the project: a) Convert Prime Farmland,Unique Farmland or Farmland of Statewide Importance,as show on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland X Mapping and Monitoring Program of the California Resources Agency,to a non- agricultural use? (Source: 1,2) b) Conflict with existing zoning for agriculture use X or a Williamson Act contract? (1,8) c) Conflict with existing zoning for,or cause rezoning of forestland (as defined by PRC Sec. 12220(8),timberland (as defined in PRC Sec. X 4526),or timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined in PRC Sec.51104(g)? (Source: 1,2) d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of forest land to non-forest use? (l,2) X e) Involve other changes in the existing environment that,due to their location or nature,could result in conversion of farmland to a non-agricultural X use or conversion of forestland to a non-forest use? (Source: 1,2) City of Dublin Page 15 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation 3. Air Quality (Where available,the significance criteria established by the applicable air quality management district may be relied on to make the following determinations). Would the project: a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the applicable air quality plan? (Source: 1,2) X b) Violate any air quality standard or contribute substantially to an existing or projected air quality violation? (Source: 1,2, 8) X c) Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant for which the project region is non-attainment under an X applicable federal or state ambient air quality standard (including releasing emissions which exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone precursors? (1,2,8) d) Expose sensitive receptors to substantial X pollutant concentrations? (8) e) Create objectionable odors affecting a X substantial number of people? (8) 4. Biological Resources. Would the project a) Have a substantial adverse effect,either directly through habitat modifications,on any species identified as a candidate,sensitive or special X status species in local or regional plans,policies or regulations,or by the California Department of Fish and Game or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? (1,2) b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans,policies or X regulations or by the California Department of Fish and Game or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?(1,2) c) Have a substantial adverse impact on federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (including but not limited to X marsh,vernal pool,coastal,etc.) through direct removal,filling,hydrological interruption or other means? (1,2) City of Dublin Page 16 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or with established native X resident or migratory wildlife corridors or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites? (l,2) e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances X protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance? f) Conflict with the provision of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation Plan or other X approved local, regional or state habitat conservation plan? (Source: 1,2, 8) 5.Cultural Resources. Would the project a) Cause a substantial adverse impact in the significance of a historical resource as X defined in Sec. 15064.5? (Source: 1,2) b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archeological resource X pursuant to Sec. 15064.5? (Source: 1,2) c) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or unique geologic X feature? (Source: 1,2) d) Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of a formal cemetery? (1,2) X 6. Geology and Soils. Would the project a) Expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving: i) Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist-Priolo Fault Zoning Map issued by the State X Geologist or based on other known evidence of a known fault? (Source: 4) _ ii) Strong seismic ground shaking? (4) X iii) Seismic-related ground failure, including X liquefaction? (Source: 4) iv) Landslides? (Source: 4) X b) Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of X topsoil? (Source: 4)) City of Dublin Page 17 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation c) Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of the project and potentially result in X on- and off-site landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse? (4) d) Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18-1-B of the Uniform Building Code X (1994), creating substantial risks to life or property? (Source: 4) e) Have soils capable of adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or alternative wastewater disposal systems where sewers X are not available for wastewater disposal? (8) 7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Would the project: a) Generate greenhouse gas emissions,either X directly or indirectly,that may have a significant impact on the environment? (8) b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation adopted for the purpose of X reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases? 8. Hazards and Hazardous Materials. Would the project: a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transport, X use or disposal of hazardous materials? (2, 4) b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable X upset and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous into the environment? (2. 8) c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous materials, substances,or waste X within one-quarter mile of an existing or proposed school? (Source: 1,2,4) i I City of Dublin Page 18 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation d) Be located on a site which is included on a list of hazardous materials sites complied pursuant to Government Code Sec. 65962.5 X and, as a result, would it create a significant hazard to the public or the environment? (8) e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such plan has not been adopted, within 2 miles of a public airport or X public use airport, would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? (Source: 8) f) For a project within the vicinity of private airstrip, would the project result in a safety X hazard for people residing or working in the project area? (Source: 8) g) Impair implementation of or physically interfere with the adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation X plan? (Source: 1,2. 4, 8) h) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving wildland fires,including where wildlands X are adjacent to urbanized areas or where residences are intermixed with wildlands? (8) 9.Hydrology and Water Quality. Would the project: a) Violate any water quality standards or waste X discharge requirements? (Source: 1,2,4) b) Substantially deplete groundwater supplies or interfere substantially with groundwater recharge such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer volume or a lowering of the X local groundwater table level (e.g. the production rate of existing nearby wells would drop to a level which would not support existing land uses or planned uses for which permits have been granted)? (Source: 1, 2,4) City of Dublin Page 19 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area,including through the alteration of the course of a stream or X river, in a manner which would result in substantial erosion or siltation on- or off- site? (Source: 1, 2,4) d) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or areas,including through the alteration of a course or stream or river, X or substantially increase the rate or amount of surface runoff in a manner which would result in flooding on- or off-site? (Source: 1, 2,7) e) Create or contribute runoff water which would exceed the capacity of existing or planned stormwater drainage systems or X provide substantial additional sources of polluted runoff? (Source: 1,2) f) Otherwise substantially degrade water X quality? (Source: 1,2,7) g) Place housing within a l 00-year flood hazard area as mapped on a Flood Hazard Boundary or Flood Insurance Rate Map or other flood X delineation map? (Source: 1 ,7) h) Place within a 100-year flood hazard area structures which impede or redirect flood X flows? (Source: 1,7) i) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury,and death involving X flooding,including flooding as a result of the failure of a levee or dam? (Source: 1,2) J) Inundation by seiche,tsunami or mudflow? X 10. Land Use and Planning. Would the project: a) Physically divide an established community? (Source: 1,2,4) X City of Dublin Page 20 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation b) Conflict with any applicable land use plan, policy, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction over the project (including but X not limited to the general plan, specific plan, or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect? (Source: 1, 2,4) c) Conflict with any applicable habitat conservation plan or natural community X conservation plan? (Source: 1,2,4) 11. Mineral Resources. Would the project a) Result in the loss of availability of a known mineral resource that would be of value to X the region and the residents of the state? (4) b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally important mineral resource recovery site delineated on a local general plan, specific X plan or other land use plan? (Source: 4) 12. Noise. Would the proposal result in: a) Exposure of persons to or generation of noise levels in excess of standards established in X the general plan or noise ordinance, or applicable standards of other agencies? (4) b) Exposure of persons or to generation of excessive groundborne vibration or X groundborne noise levels? (Source: 4) c) A substantial permanent increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above X existing levels without the project? (4) j d) A substantial temporary or periodic increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity X above levels without the project? (4) e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport X or public use airport, would the project expose people residing or working n the project area to excessive noise levels? (8) City of Dublin Page 21 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Ibnpact With Impact Impact Mitigation f) For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project expose people X residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? (8) 13.Population and Housing. Would the project a) Induce substantial population growth in an area, either directly or indirectly (for X example,through extension of roads or other infrastructure)? (1 ,2) b) Displace substantial numbers of existing housing, necessitating the construction of X replacement housing elsewhere? (l ,2) c) Displace substantial numbers of people, necessitating the replacement of housing X elsewhere? (Source: 1, 2) 14. Public Services. Would the proposal: a) Would the project result in substantial adverse physical impacts associated with the provision of new or physically altered governmental facilities,the construction of which could cause significant environmental impacts, in order to maintain acceptable service ratios, response times or other performance objectives for any of the public services? (Source: 1 , 2,7) Fire protection? X Police protection? X Schools? X Parks? X Other public facilities X 15.Recreation: a) Would the project increase the use of existing neighborhood or regional parks or other recreational facilities such that substantial X physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be accelerated? (Source: 1,2,6) b) Does the project include recreational facilities or require the construction or expansion of recreational facilities which might have an X adverse physical effect on the environment? (Source: 1,2,6) City of Dublin Page 22 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation 16.Transportation and Traffic. Would the project: a) Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system, taking into account all X modes of transportation, including mass transit and all non-motorized travel and relevant components of the circulation system, including but not limited to intersections, streets, highways and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths and mass transit? (Source: 1,2,4) b) Conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including but not X limited to, level of service and travel demand measures, or other standards established by the county congestion management agency for designated roads or highways?-(Source: 1,2,4) c) Result in a change in air traffic patterns, including either an increase in traffic levels X or a change in location that results in substantial safety risks? (Source: 1,2) d) Substantially increase hazards due to a design feature (e.g. sharp curves or dangerous X intersections) or incompatible uses, such as farm equipment? (Source: 8) e) Result in inadequate emergency access? (4) X f) Conflict with adopted policies, plans or programs regarding public transit, bicycle or pedestrian facilities or otherwise decrease the X performance of safety of such facilities? (4) 17. Utilities and Service Systems. Would the project a) Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the applicable Regional Water Quality X Control Board? (Source: 4,7) City of Dublin Page 23 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation b) Require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or expansion of existing facilities,the X construction of which could cause significant environmental effects? (5, 8) c) Require or result in the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or expansion of existing facilities,the construction of X which could cause significant environmental effects? (8) d) Have sufficient water supplies available to X serve the project from existing water entitlements and resources, or are new or expanded entitlements needed? (5) e) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider which serves or may serve the project that it has adequate X capacity to serve the project's projected demand in addition to the providers existing commitments? (Source: 8) f) Be served by a landfill with sufficient permitted capacity to accommodate the X project's solid waste disposal needs? g) Comply with federal, state and local statutes X and regulations related to solid waste? (8) 18. Mandatory Findings of Significance. a) Does the project have the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species,cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self-sustaining levels,threaten to X eliminate a plant or animal community, reduce the number of or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory? I City of Dublin Page 24 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Potentially Less Than Less than No Impact/ Significant Significant Significant No New Impact With Impact Impact Mitigation b) Does the project have impacts that are individually limited, but cumulatively considerable? ("Cumulatively considerable" X means that the incremental effects of a project are considerable when viewed in connection with the effects of past projects, the effects of other current projects and the effects of probable future projects). c) Does the project have environmental effects which will cause substantial adverse effects X on human beings, either directly or indirectly? Sources used to determine potential environmental impacts 1) Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan EIR 2) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR 3) Dublin General Plan, City of Dublin 4) Final Urban Water Management Plan, DSRSD, 2010 Update 6) Parks and Recreation Master Plan, City of Dublin, 2006 update 7) Discussion with City staff or service provider S) Other Source City of Dublin Page 25 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Attachment to Initial Study Discussion of Checklist Legend PS: Potentially Significant LS/M: Less Than Significant After Mitigation LS: Less Than Significant Impact N/NNI: No Impact/No New Impact 1. Aesthetics Project Impacts a-c) Have a substazztial adverse impact ozz a sceizic vista, damage scenic resources (including a scenic highway) or substantially degrade the visual character of a site? NNI. Potential housing sites identified in the proposed Housing Element are located in the Eastern Extended Planning area and in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. Housing sites located in the Eastern Extended Planning Area and impacts related to scenic vistas, scenic resources and substantial degradation of the scenic characters of the various housing sites have been analyzed in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (EDSP EIR). Housing sites located within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area have been analyzed in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (DDSP EIR). Future site-specific housing developments anticipated by the proposed Housing Element are subject to applicable Mitigation Measures included in these two certified CEQA documents to ensure that'impacts related to scenic vistas, scenic resources and the visual character of housing sites have been reduced to a less-than-significant level. In 1996, the City of Dublin adopted the Eastern Dublin Scenic Corridor Policies azzd Standards that apply to portions of the Eastern Extended Planning Area. The purpose of this document is to implement Eastern Dublin Specific Plan (EDSP) visual protection polices as related to individual development projects. Residential development projects anticipated by the proposed Housing Element are subject to the provisions of this document, which generally require limitations on blockage of views to visually sensitive hillsides in the northern and eastern portions of the Eastern Extended Planning Area. Applicable impacts and mitigation measures included in previously certified CEQA documents that include the housing opportunity sites (see Exhibit 3) include: City of Dublin Page 26 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Easter-n DublM EIR Impact 3.8/A, Standardized "Tract" Development identifies the potential impact for development to inadequately respond to natural site conditions. Adherence to Mitigation Measure 3.8/1.0, which requires consistency with EDSP Goal 6.3.4 to establish a visually distinctive community that preserves the character of the landscape, reduced this impact to a level of insignificance. Impact 3.8/B, Alteration of Rural and Open Space Visual Character was identified as a significant and unavoidable impact even with adherence to Mitigation Measure 3.8/2, which would implement the EDSP land plan with retention of predominant natural features and encouraging a sense of openness in Eastern Dublin. This impact was included in the Statement of Overriding Considerations when adopting the underlying project (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). Impact 3.8/C, Obscuring Distinctive Natural Features identifies the potential of EDSP buildings and related improvements to obscure or alter existing features and reduce the visual uniqueness of the Eastern Extended Planning Area. Implementation of Mitigation Measure 3.8/3.0, which would implement EDSP Policy 6-28 to preserve streams and other natural features, reduced this impact to a level of insignificance. Impact 3.8/D, Alteration of Visual Quality of Hillsides notes that grading and excavation of building sites in hillside areas would compromise the visual quality of the EDSP area. Mitigation Measures 3.8/4.0 through 3.8/4.5 are included in the Eastern Dublin EIR to reduce Impact 3.8/D to a level of insignificance. These Mitigation Measures require implementation of EDSP Policies 6-32 through 6-38 requiring grading techniques to minimize disturbance of hillsides. Impact 3.8/E, Alteration of Visual Quality of Ridges states that structures built in proximity to ridges may obscure or fragment the profile of visually sensitive ridgelines. Implementation of Mitigation Measures 3.8/5.0 through 3.8/5.2 would reduce this impact to a less-than-significant level. These measures require the implementation of EDSP Policies 6-29 and 6-30 and Parks and Open Space Element Guiding Policy 3.4.1.A.3. Restrict structures on the hillsides that appear above major ridgelines and Implementing Policy 3.4.1.13.4, use subdivision design and site design review process to preserve or enhance the ridgelines that form the skyline as viewed from freeways (1-580 or I-680) or major arterial streets. Impact 3.8/F, Alteration of Visual Character of Flatlands states that buildout of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan will alter the visual character of the Eastern Dublin area by reducing valley grasses and agricultural fields. No mitigation was identified for this impact and it was deemed to be significant and unavoidable. This impact was included in the Statement City of Dublin Page 27 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 of Overriding Considerations for the project (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). Impact 3.8/G, Alteration of Visual Character of Watercourses found a potentially significant impact with regard to planned development adjacent to watercourses that would reduce the visibility and function of watercourses as a distinct landscape. Mitigation Measure3.8/6.0 reduced this impact to a less-than-significant level by requiring development adjacent to creeks to maintain visual access to such streams. Impact 3.8/I, Scenic Vistas, includes alteration of the character of existing scenic vistas and important sightlines. With implementation of Mitigation Measures 3.8/7.0 and 3.8/7.1, this impact would be reduced to a level of insignificance. Mitigation Measure 3.8/7.0 requires adherence to EDSP Policy 6-5 to preserve views of open space areas and Measure 3.8/7.1 requires the City to conduct a visual survey of the EDSP area and to identify and map viewsheds of scenic vistas. Impact 3.8/j, Scenic Routes, identifies that urban development within the EDSP area will significantly alter the visual experience of travelers on scenic routes in Eastern Dublin. Implementation of Mitigation Measures 3.8/8.0 and 8.1 will reduce this impact to a level of insignificance. These two measures require implementation of EDSP Action Programs 6Q and 6R that requires the City to adopt scenic corridor policies. The City adopted the Eastern Dublin Scenic Corridor Policies and Standards by Resolution No. 34-96 on March 26, 1996. Dowiztozvii Dublin Spec& Plait EIR The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR identified no significant impacts, and noted that the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan includes detailed development standards and design guidelines that will result in more visually appealing development in the Downtown. With adherence to the above Eastern Dublin EIR Mitigation Measures and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Design Guidelines , there would be no new or more severe significant impacts related to scenic vistas, damage to scenic resources, including scenic highways, or substantial degradation of the visual character of identified housing sites than identified in the prior EIRs. No additional analysis is required. For significant and unavoidable impacts, such as Alteration of Rural/Open Space Character and Visual Character of Flatlands, a Statement of Overriding Considerations was adopted when approving the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan (City Council Resolution No. 53- 93). d) Create liglit or glare? LS. Housing sites located in the Eastern Extended Planning Area are generally within undeveloped or sparsely areas; however, all are programmed for future urban uses pursuant to the Dublin General Plan and City of Dublin Page 28 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. Minimal lighting sources are present on many of these sites, primarily yard lights from scattered rural farmsteads. The City of Dublin Community Development Department staff will review all future individual housing development projects as part of required Site Development Review (SDR) permit applications ensure that spillover of light and glare from individual housing sites is limited. Standard conditions of approval will be imposed to ensure that spillover of light and glare from individual housing sites is limited. For future residential development within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area, the Specific Plan includes design guidelines that address limiting spill- over of future light and glare. These include discouraging flood lighting on building exteriors, use of indirect and uplighting, directing light fixtures downward, limitations on "overlighting" of buildings and installation of lighting at regular intervals to minimize creation of light and dark pockets. The EIR found a less than significant impact based on compliance with these design guidelines. Development of the housing units in the DDSP area would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to light and glare than identified in the DDSP EIR and no additional analysis is required Overall, light and glare impacts associated with the proposed Housing Element will be less-than-significant. 2. Agricultural & Forestry Resources Project Impacts a-c) Couvert PrHue Farrulaud, conflict witli agricultural zouiug or a Williamson Act Couservatiou Agreeiueut or convert prime farmland to a Tzon-agricultural use? NNI. Impacts with respect to conversion of prime farmland to urban uses, discontinuation of agricultural land uses and indirect impacts of non-renewal of Williamson Act land conservation contracts were analyzed in the Eastern Dublin EIR for the entire Eastern Extended Planning Area. These impacts were deemed insignificant except for the cumulative loss of agricultural lands, which was significant and unavoidable (Impact 3.1/F). Approval of the Housing Element anticipates future construction of residential development projects, with some of the housing sites within the Eastern Extended Planning Area. Development of the housing units in this area would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to agricultural lands than identified in the prior EIR and no additional analysis is required. All housing sites in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area are zoned as PD- Planned Development. None of these sites support agricultural uses or operations. Housing Site 1 was subject to a Williamson Act Land Conservation Agreement in 1993 at the time the Eastern Dublin EIR was certified; however, based on a discussion with the property owner, the contract was non-renewed City of Dublin Page 29 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 and was terminated in 2010 (source: P. Croak, property owner representative, 8/29/14). Housing sites within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are not zoned or developed for agricultural uses nor is there a Williamson Act contract on these sites. There would be no agricultural resource impacts of future housing development on these sites. d) Result in the loss of forest land or conversion of forest land to a norr forest use? NI. No forest land exists within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area or the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area; therefore, no impact would result with respect to this topic. No additional analysis is required. e) Involve other changes which, due to their location or nature, could result of forest land to a non forest use? No Impact. See item "d," above. 3. Air Quality Project Impacts a) Would the project conflict or obstruct inrplenrentatiou of an air quality plan? NI. Residential dwellings included in the Housing Element are currently included within the Dublin General Plan and current land use projections prepared by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), which are used for air quality emissions included in the Bay Area Air Quality Management District's Clean Air Plan. No impacts are therefore anticipated with respect to conflicts to or obstructions of the Clean Air Plan. b,c) Would the project violate any air quality staudards or result in cumulatively considerable air pollutants? NNI. The Eastern Dublin EIR analyzed impacts related to both project-level air quality impacts as well as cumulative impacts to regional air quality. Identified impacts in this EIR included Impact 3.11/A (dust deposition from construction activity), Impact 3.11/B (construction equipment and vehicle emissions), Impact 3.11/C (mobile sources of Reactive Organic Gasses and Nitrogen Oxide) and Impact 3.11/E (stationary source emissions). All of these air quality impacts were found to be significant and unavoidable and in approving the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, a Statement of Overriding Considerations was adopted for project and cumulative air quality emissions (City Council Resolution No. 53- 93). The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR found that buildout of future land uses within Downtown Dublin would not result in significant impacts with respect to short-term air emissions or long-term air emissions. City of Dublin Page 30 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Impacts of constructing future dwellings included in the proposed Housing Element have been analyzed in previous CEQA documents identified in the Earlier Analysis section of this Initial Study. There are no new or more severe significant impacts related to air quality than identified in the prior EIRs and no new analysis is required. All air quality Mitigation Measures contained in previous CEQA documents will continue to apply to future residential construction occurring in each of the respective areas covered by the previous CEQA documents. Future individual housing projects proposed are also subject to Implementing Policy 7.5.1.A.2 contained in the Conservation Element of the Dublin General Plan that requires completion of an air quality analysis for new development projects that could generate significant air emissions on a project and cumulative level. The analysis must also provide for site-specific measures to reduce any significant air quality impact to a less-than-significant level based on Bay Area Air Quality Management District standards. d) Expose sensitive receptors to significant pollittaiit concentrations? LS. The proposed Housing Element anticipates the construction of new dwelling units that could be occupied by sensitive receptor populations (senior citizens, chronically ill individuals, etc.). As required by the Dublin General Plan Implementing Policy 7.5.1.A.2 cited in the above subsection, future individual housing projects that could generate significant air emissions on a project and/or cumulative basis shall include specific measures to reduce specific air quality impacts to a less- than-significant level. This review will take place as part of the normal and customary City of Dublin review process, including but not limited to Stage 2 Development Plans and/or applications for Site Development Review permits, either or both of which would be required for development of any of the housing sites. e) Create objectionable odors? NI. The project would not result in new land uses that would emit objectionable odors. No impacts are therefore anticipated. 4. Biological Resources Project Impacts a-c) Have a substantial adverse impact oil a caiididate, sensitive, special-status species riparian liabitat or wetlands? LS. Future housing projects that could be constructed in the City of Dublin pursuant to the proposed Housing Element are subject to guiding policies contained in the Environmental Resources Management/ Conservation Element of the Dublin General Plan. This Element contains both guiding and implementing polices to protect stream corridors and riparian vegetation (Section 7.2), provisions for erosion and siltation control (Section 7.3) and protection of oak woodlands (Section 7.4). Future development on housing sites in the Eastern Extended Planning Area are subject to environmental mitigation measures contained in the Eastern City of Dublin Page 31 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Dublin EIR. This EIR identified potential impacts related to the general effects of potential development on biological resources in the Eastern Extended Planning Area, including direct habitat loss; indirect habitat loss due to vegetation removal for construction and development activities; and, loss or degradation of sensitive habitat (IM 3.7/A, B, and Q. The Eastern Dublin EIR also identified potential impacts related to wildlife species such as the San Joaquin Kit Fox, California Red-Legged Frog (CRLF), California Tiger Salamander (CTS), and others (IM 3.7/D , F-I, K-P, S). Raptor electrocutions associated with proposed high-voltage power lines were addressed in depth in the 1993 Eastern Dublin EIR (IM 3.7/L), and included Mitigation Measures (MM 3.7/26.0 and 3.4/42.0). Mitigation Measures were adopted to, among other things, prepare resource management plans, avoid development in sensitive areas, and revegetate disturbed areas (generally Mitigation Measure 3.7/1.0 -28.0). All site-specific housing developments proposed within the Eastern Extended Planning Area are required to comply with all of these Mitigation Measures, including future housing projects anticipated in the proposed Housing Element. Even with mitigation, the City concluded that the cumulative loss or degradation of botanically sensitive habitat was a significant and unavoidable impact (IM 3.7/Q. Upon approval of the Eastern Dublin GPA/SP, the City adopted a Statement of Overriding Considerations for this significant unavoidable impact (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). No significant biological resources, including but not limited to special-status plant or wildlife species, birds, fish or reptiles or their respective habitats or wetlands were identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to biological resources than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. d) Interfere with movement of dative fisli or wildlife species? LS. Development on the housing sites must adhere to adopted Mitigation Measures identified in the above subsection. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to movement of fish or wildlife species than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. e, f) Conflict with local policies or ordiiiar2ces protecting biological resources or any adopted Habitat Conservation Plans or Natural Community Conservation Plans? NI. Identified housing sites lie within the Eastern Alameda County Conservation Strategy (EACCS) planning area. The City of Dublin utilizes the Conservation Strategy as guidance for environmental permitting for public projects, and private development projects are encouraged to use the EACCS as a resource as well. The Conservation Strategy embodies a regional approach to permitting and mitigation for wildlife habitat impacts associated with land development, infrastructure, and other activities. The Conservation Strategy is neither a Habitat Conservation Plan nor a Natural Community Conservation Plan, but is a document intended to provide guidance during the project planning and City of Dublin Page 32 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 permitting process to ensure that impacts are offset in a biologically effective manner. No impacts would therefore result. 5. Cultural Resources Project Impacts a) Cause substantial adverse change to significant 1istoric resources? NNI. A majority of potential housing sites in the Eastern Extended Planning Area (identified on Exhibit 3) are vacant and there would be no impact with substantial changes to historic resources. The Eastern Dublin EIR identifies the Croak property (Site 1 on Exhibit 3) as containing historic resources, including a house, barn, tack house and several outbuildings. The Eastern Dublin EIR determined that future development of the Croak site would remove or disturb resources on this site (Impact IM 3.9/Q. Adherence to Mitigation Measures 3.9/7.0 -12.0 reduced this impact to a less-than-significant level by requiring historic resources proposed for development to be subject to in-depth archival research to determine the specific level of historic significance, encouraging the adaptive reuse of historic resources, evaluation by an architectural historian, recordation on the California Historical site inventory and similar measures. These measures would be applied to any future housing developments proposed on Site 1. The few existing structures on the rest of the Eastern Dublin sites shown in Table 2 are not historical resources. None of the sites in the DDSP area contain historical resources. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to historical resources than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. b-d) Cause a substantial adverse impact or destructiou to archeological or paleontological resources, or lutmau remains that may be interred outside of a formal cemetery? NNI. The Eastern Dublin EIR identifies a remote but potentially significant possibility that construction activities, including site grading, trenching and excavation, may uncover significant archeological and/or paleontological resources on development sites within the Eastern Extended Planning Area. Mitigation Measures 3.9/1.0 through 3.9/4.0 for Impact 3.9/A require, subsurface testing for archeological resources, if such are found during site disturbance; recordation and mapping of such resources; and, development of a protection program for resources which qualify as "significant" under Section 15064.5 of the CEQA Guidelines (then Appendix K). Mitigation Measures 3.9/5.0 and 3.9/6.0, also were adopted to address Impact 3.9/B, the potential disruption of any previously unidentified pre-historic resources. These measures require cessation of construction activities until uncovered cultural resources can be assessed by a qualified archeologist and a remediation plan approved by the City of Dublin consistent with CEQA Guidelines. Future housing developments in the Eastern Extended Planning Area that could be facilitated as a result of the Housing Element are required to comply with above measures to ensure these impacts will remain less-than-significant. City of Dublin Page 33 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 No identified historic, archeological, Native American or other cultural resources were identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to subsurface archeological, paleontological or human remains than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. 6. Geology and Soils Project ImUacts a) Expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse impacts, including loss, injury or death related to groufzd rupture, seismic ground shaking,ground failure, or landslides? LS. The proposed project would facilitate construction of new dwellings through implementation of the proposed Housing Element. Potential impacts related to soil and geologic impacts on future residential construction are addressed in Seismic Safety Element of the Dublin General Plan. This Element addresses impacts related to groundshaking, ground rupture, and soil- based hazards, such as differential settlement, liquefaction and landslides. Guiding Policy 8.2.1.A.1 of this Element states that "geological hazards shall be mitigated or development shall be located away from geological hazards in order to preserve life, protect property and reasonably limit the financial risks to the City of Dublin and other public agencies that would result from damage to poorly located public facilities." For properties located within the Eastern Extended Planning Area, the Eastern Dublin EIR contains a number impacts and related of Mitigation Measures to reduce anticipated geology and soils impacts for site-specific development projects. These include: • Mitigation Measure 3.6/1.0 reduced the primary effects of ground shaking (Impact 3.6/B) by requiring conformity with seismic safety requirements of applicable building codes. Even with adherence to this mitigation, this impact was considered significant and unavoidable. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/2.0-7.0 reduced impacts related to the secondary effects of seismic ground shaking to a less-than-significant level (Impact 3.6/Q. These measures require placement of structures set back from unstable landforms; stabilization of unsuitable land forms; use of engineered retention structures and installation of suitable subdrains and appropriate design of fill material; and, preparation of design level geotechnical studies. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/9.0 and 10.0 reduced impacts related to substantial alteration of landforms in the Eastern Dublin area to a less- than-significant level by limiting grading on steeply sloping areas and City of Dublin Page 34 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 by appropriate siting of roads and structures to minimize grading (Impact 3.6/D). • Mitigation Measures 3.6/11.0-13.0 reduced impacts related to shallow groundwater to a less-than-significant level (Impacts 3.6/F and G). These measures require submittal of detailed geotechnical investigations to investigate possible risks of groundwater conditions to proposed improvements, control of high groundwater through installation of subdrains and removal of stock ponds then in the Eastern Dublin area. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/14.0-16.0 reduced impacts related to shrink- swell soil hazards to a less-than-significant level (Impact 3.6/H). These measures require controlling moisture in the soil surrounding individual development projects and appropriately designed foundations. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/17.0-19.0 reduced impacts related to natural slope stability to a less-than-significant level (Impact 3.6/I). These measures require appropriate siting of improvements to avoid unstable soils, remedial grading where needed to remove unstable soils and installation of subdrains and other improvements to minimize soil stability impacts. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/20.0-26.0 reduced impacts related to stability of cut-and-fill slope to a less-than-significant level (Impact 3.6/J). These measures require minimizing the use of grading when siting proposed improvements, conformance to local grading requirements, minimizing the angle of cut-and-fill slopes to 3:1 and use of engineering techniques to stabilize manufactured slopes. • Mitigation Measures 3.6/27.0 and 28.0 reduced impacts related to erosion and sedimentation to a less-than-significant level (Impacts 3.6/K and Q. These measures require general limitations on grading to avoid the rainy season of each year and require installation of erosion control improvements. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR contains the following mitigation measures to reduce soils and geological impacts to a less-than-significant level: • Mitigation Measure 3.3-1 reduced impacts related to seismic groundshaking and liquefaction (Impacts 3.3-2 and 3.3-3) to a less- than-significant level by requiring preparation of site-specific geotechnical reports for future developments. Each report shall evaluate the potential for liquefaction, lateral spreading and other seismic hazards. Each report shall include recommendations for foundation designs and structural elements to minimize seismic effects. City of Dublin Page 35 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 • Mitigation Measure 3.5-1a reduced impacts related to soil erosion from sites in the downtown area (Impact 3.3-4) to a less-than-significant level by requiring individual developers to file a Notice of Intent with the Regional Water Quality Control Board describing erosion control measures to be undertaken. • Mitigation Measure 3.5-1b also reduced erosion impacts to a less-than- significant impact by requiring individual developers to file Storm`vater Pollution Prevention Plan prior to site grading operations. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant seismic-related geologic impacts than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. b) Is the site subject to sitbstaiitial erosiorn andlor the loss of topsoil? LS. Although new housing would be constructed in the community pursuant to the proposed Housing Element of the General Plan, adherence to Best Management Practices (BMPs) as required by the Alameda County Clean Water Program and enforced by the City of Dublin as part of normal and customary review of individual development projects will ensure less-than-significant impacts regarding substantial soil erosion or loss of topsoil. These BMPs typically include but are not limited to installation of silt fences, sandbags and similar measures to minimize substantial erosion and loss of topsoil. c-d) Is the site located on soil that is unstable or expansive and that could result iii potential lateral spreading, liquefaction, landslide or collapse? NNI. Potential geologic impacts of the housing sites were analyzed in the Eastern Dublin EIR and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Mitigation Measures for future site- specific housing sites will ensure that impacts related to unstable soils, liquefaction, lateral spreading, landslide and other soil hazards will be less- than-significant. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to soil instability than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. e) Have soils incapable of supporting on-site septic tanks if sewers are not available? NI. All new housing projects are required by the City of Dublin to connect to the local sewer system, maintained by the Dublin San Ramon Services District. No impacts would therefore result with regard to septic systems. 7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Discussion: a,b) Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either directly or indirectly, that may have a significant impact on the environment or conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulatior2 adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases? LS. Housing development projects that would be facilitated by the proposed Housing Element would generate greenhouse gasses (GHGs) into the atmosphere. Primary City of Dublin Page 36 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 sources of GHG emissions include mobile sources from vehicles, energy use, water use, and disposal of material into landfills. In July 2013, the City of Dublin adopted an updated and revised Climate Action Plan (CAP) The CAP includes an inventory of existing emissions within the City and a number of measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 15% below the 2010 level of greenhouse gas emission by the year 2020. Land uses assumed for the GHG inventory are based on General Plan land uses. The proposed Housing Element would not change any General Plan land use designations and would be consistent with ABAG regional growth projections.. The City's CAP is considered a "qualified" plan and may be used to assess GHG emissions of projects. Page 53 of the CAP notes that the City needs to consider the following points when determining if a project is consistent with the CAP. These include: • The extent to which the project supports or includes applicable strategies or measures to advance the actions identified in the CAP; • The consistency of plans with ABAG population or growth projections; • The extent to which the project would interfere with implementation of CAP strategies, measures or actions. Although no specific residential development is currently proposed, future residential uses will be required to comply with applicable provisions of the Community Design & Sustainability Element of the Dublin General Plan. The intent of this Element is to assist in reducing overall energy use and GHG emissions, consistent with the CAP directive to include measures that advance CAP strategies. Specific policies contained in this Element applicable to future individual housing projects include: • Policy 10.9.3.C. Consider environmentally sensitive and energy-efficient building siting which minimizes impacts from wind, provides shade, reduces stormwater runoff, and maximizes opportunities for passive solar design, where feasible. • Policy 10.9.3.E. Promote walking and bicycling through site and building design. • Policy 10.9.3.F. Encourage alternative modes of transportation by providing priority parking for carpool and alternative energy vehicles, bicycle racks and lockers, showers for employees and easy access to adjacent regional trails and transit stops. • Policy 10.9.3.K. Encourage development features that minimize the use of non-renewal energy consumption. • Policy 10.9.3.0. Incorporate recycling and green waste containers into the design of sites and integrate into buildings where feasible. City of Dublin Page 37 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Since the proposed Housing Element is consistent with the City's Climate Action Plan, greenhouse gas impacts is expected to be less-than-significant. 8. Hazards and Hazardous Materials Project Impacts a) Create significant hazards to the public or the euvironrneitt through the routine transport, use or disposal hazardous materials? NI. Implementation of the proposed Housing Element would not involve any industrial, manufacturing or similar land uses or activities that would use, generate, transport or store significant quantities of hazardous materials. The intent of the proposed Housing Element is to encourage construction of new housing in Dublin. No impact is anticipated with regard to this topic. b, c) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset and accidental conditions involving the release of hazardous materials into the errviroruneut or emit hazardous materials or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances or wastes within one-quarter mile of au existing or proposed school LS. The proposed Housing Element anticipates future residential development which is not expected to create hazardous emissions. A majority of the housing sites in the Eastern Extended Planning Area are vacant and have historically been used for agriculture. One or more candidate housing sites could contain some level of hazardous materials as a result of existing or previous uses or activities on that site or sites, including Site 5. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR contains the following mitigation measures to reduce hazard impacts to a less-than-significant level: • Mitigation Measure 3.5-1a reduced impacts related to transport, use, disposal and release of hazards during construction on sites in the downtown area (Impact 3.4-2) to a less-than-significant level by requiring individual developers to file a Notice of Intent with the Regional Water Quality Control Board describing erosion control measures to be undertaken. • Mitigation Measure 3.5-1b also reduced impacts related to transport, use, disposal and release of hazardous material in the downtown area to a less-than-significant impact by requiring individual developers to file Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan prior to site grading operations. • Mitigation Measure 3.4-1 reduced impacts related to release of contaminated materials into the atmosphere from building demolition to a less-than-significant level by requiring testing of lead based pints and asbestos containing material prior to demolition. If found, contaminants must be removed prior to building demolition. City of Dublin Page 38 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 • Mitigation Measure 3.4-2 reduced impacts related to disturbance of soil or groundwater (Impact 3.4-4) to a less-than-significant level by requiring future development or substantial redevelopment projects in the downtown area to prepare Phase I Site Assessments to determine the presence or absence of contaminated material. If contaminants are found above recognized screening thresholds, additional testing and/or remediation is required, The Eastern Dublin EIR did not analyze hazardous materials; however, any development on the housing sites in Eastern Dublin would be subject to extensive federal, state and local regulations. These regulations are detailed in the DDSP EIR and are the basis for that EIR's mitigation measures. The base regulations would also apply to development of all the housing sites. One or more candidate housing sites could contain some level of hazardous materials as a result of existing or previous uses or activities on that site or sites, including Site 5. As part of the normal and customary City of Dublin demolition permit process, future site-specific housing applicants must obtain clearance from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District regarding the presence of asbestos building materials, lead based paints and any other potentially hazardous materials that could be emitted during building demolition. If found, such materials must be remediated prior to commencement of demolition activities. The housing sites would not use or generate hazardous materials and would not result in an identified hazardous materials site within a one-quarter mile radius of an existing or planned public school. d) Be listed on a site that is included on a list of liazardous materials sites complied on the Cortese List and, as a result, would create a significant hazard to the public or environment? LS. None of the housing sites shown on Exhibit 3 are listed on the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) Cortese List of hazardous sites as of July 13, 2014. The Cortese List identifies one potentially contaminated site in Dublin, which is the Parks RFTA (also known as Camp Parks). Parks RFTA is not located near any identified housing sites (see Exhibit 3) and no impact would result with respect to this topic. e,f) Is the site located within an airport land use plan of a public airport or private airstrip? LS. Housing sites 1, 2, 3, 6, 8 and 10 are located within the Airport Influence Area (AIA) of Livermore Municipal Airport, which is located south of the I-580 freeway in the City of Livermore. None of these sites are located in the Airport Protection Area (APA) however. Future housing projects constructed pursuant to the proposed Housing Element will be reviewed for compliance with the Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan for the Livermore Municipal Airport and, if applicable, will be referred to the Alameda County Airport Land Use Commission (ALUC) for review. None of the sites in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are located within an airport land use plan. This is anticipated to be a less-than-significant impact. City of Dublin Page 39 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 g) Intei ference with aii emergency evacuation plan? NI. Future housing units constructed as a result of updating the Housing Element will be constructed on private lands and will be reviewed by the Dublin Fire Prevention Bureau, Police Department and Community Development Department to ensure that no interference with emergency plans would occur. No impacts are anticipated with regard to this topic. h) Expose people and structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving wildland fires or where residences are intermixed witli zvildlands? NNI. A majority of housing sites within the Eastern Extended Planning Area are located within urban/wildland interface areas where there is a moderate to high potential for wildland fires. Future site-specific housing projects constructed on these sites are subject to Eastern Dublin EIR Mitigation Measures 3.4/9.0 -12.0 that requires individual development projects to incorporate fire safety components, including buffer zones, fire trails and fire breaks. With adherence to these measures, the impact of wildland fire will be less-than-significant. No sites within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR are located in a wildfire area. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to wildfire than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. 9. Hydrology and Water Quality Project Impacts a) Violate any water gi.iality standards or waste discliarge regiiiremeiits? LS. Construction of new dwellings anticipated in the proposed Housing Element are planned for in the current Dublin General Plan and have been included in the Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) wastewater master planning by the District. District wastewater facilities do not exceed Regional Water Quality Control Board discharge requirements ( The issue of exceedances of water quality standards and waste discharge requirements have also been previously analyzed in earlier CEQA documents identified in the Earlier Analysis section of this Initial Study. Implementation of individual housing projects as facilitated by the Housing Element would not exceed waste discharge requirements imposed on DSRSD by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (source: St. Klodozie, DSRSD, 4/7/14). In addition, regarding surface water quality impacts, the City of Dublin enforces the most recent NPDES water quality standards to ensure that potentially polluted runoff from upland sites into creeks, streams and other bodies of water are reduced to a less-than-significant level. This occurs during City review of all development applications. City of Dublin Page 40 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 This impact would be less-than-significant. b) Substautially deplete groundwater recharge areas or lowering of water table? NNI. The source of water to all dwellings in the City of Dublin is imported surface water supplied by DSRSD and Zone 7 Flood Control and Water Conservation District that does not primarily rely on local groundwater. Mitigation Measures 3.5/49.0 and 50.0 contained in the Eastern Dublin EIR, minimized the impact of reduced groundwater recharge areas to an insignificant level (Impact 3.5/Z). The two Mitigation Measures require that facilities be planned and management practices selected that protect and enhance water quality and that Zone 7 programs for groundwater recharge be supported. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR did not identify any significant impact with respect to groundwater recharge area or depletion of the local water table. There would be no new or more severe significant impact with lowering of the water table or reducing the amount of groundwater recharge areas than analyzed in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. c) Substantially alter drainage patterns, including streambed courses such that substantial siltation or erosion would occur? NNI. The proposed Housing Element identifies future housing sites on currently vacant or underutilized properties within the Eastern Extended Planning area and the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. The construction of future housing units could result in a greater quantity of stormwater runoff as a result of increasing the amount of impervious surfaces. The City of Dublin enforces Best Management Practices included in the Alameda County Clean Water Plan to minimize siltation and erosion from individual sites. These include both construction and post- construction BMPs, including but not limited to requiring installation of silt fences and straw bales on construction sites and frequent sweeping of parking areas, covering of solid waste dumpsters and other post-construction measures. Implementation of BMPs is required for all new development, so there would be no significant impacts from altered drainage patterns. Eastern Dublin EIR Mitigation Measures 3.5/44.0-48.0 reduced the potentially significant impact of flooding from increased runoff (Impact 3.5/Y). These measures require storm drainage master planning (MM 3.5/46.0); natural channel improvements wherever possible (MM 3.5/45.0); drainage facilities that minimize any increased potential for erosion or flooding (MM 3.5/44.0); and, provision of facilities to control downstream flooding (MM 3.5/47.0). These measures are applied to new housing developments in Eastern Dublin to reduce impacts to drainage patterns and erosion to a level of insignificance. No impacts to substantial alteration of drainage patterns were identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. City of Dublin Page 41 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to soil erosion than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required d,e) Substantially alter drainage patterns or resldt in flooding, eitlier on or off the project site, create stornwater runoff that woidd exceed the capacity of drainage systems or add substantial amounts of polluted runoff? NNI. Refer to item "c," above. No new or more severe significant impacts are anticipated with respect to this topic. f) Substantially degrade water quality? LS. The City of Dublin requires all individual development projects, including future housing projects facilitated as a result of the proposed Housing Element, to meet Best Management Practices to ensure that water quality would be protected. Best Management Practices are described above in Section 8c of this Initial Study. In addition, Mitigation Measures 3.5/52.0 -55.0 contained in the Eastern Dublin EIR reduced the impact of non-point source pollution into local waterways, including urban runoff, non-stormwater discharges, subsurface drainages and construction runoff (Impact 3.5/AA). With the implementation of Mitigation Measures requiring each development to prepare project-specific water quality investigations addressing this issue, the development of a community-based non-point-source control education program and other requirements, this potential impact and potential cumulative impact would be reduced to a level of insignificance. Mitigation Measures 3.5-1a and 3.5-1b included in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR reduced impacts related to degradation of water quality to a less-than-significant level. A less-than-significant impact is anticipated with regard to this topic. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant impacts related to water quality than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. g-i) Place housing within a 100-year flood hazard area as mapped by a Flood Insurance Rate Map, or iinpede or redirect flood flow, including dam failure? LS. Housing sites 1-6, 8 and 10 are not located within a 100-year flood hazard area (source:J. Imai, Dublin Public Works Department, 7/29/14). Although portions of sites 7 and 9 may partially be located within a 100-year flood hazard area, the City of Dublin prohibits construction of housing within flood hazard areas (see Dublin Municipal Code Section 7.24). Future individual housing projects on Sites 7 and 9 would need to avoid flood prone areas, elevate future housing above a flood hazard area or install other improvements to minimize flood hazards. No flooding impacts were identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. City of Dublin Page 42 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Overall, this impact is expected to be less-than-significant. j) Resr.tlt in intndatioii by seiclie, tsunami or mudflows? NI. There are expected to be no impacts with regard to seiche or tsunami , since housing sites would be located inland from major bodies of water. As to mudflows, Mitigation Measures 3.6/17.0 through 19.0 contained in the Eastern Dublin EIR provide protection from slope failures of natural slopes (Impact 3.6/I) by limiting new development on unstable soils, removal and replacement of unstable soils and similar actions. The DDSP area is flat and would not experience mudflows. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant \ impacts related to the above topics than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. 10. Land Use and Planning Project Impacts a) Physically divide att establislied conununity? NI. Construction of future dwellings under the auspices of the proposed Housing Element would be allowed based on the Dublin General Plan and other land use regulatory documents, including the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan and would not physically divide an established community. No impacts are anticipated. b) Conflict with aiiy applicable laud use plan, policy or regt,tlatioii? NI. The proposed Housing Element includes potential housing opportunity sites, as required by the State of California. These are shown on Exhibit 3. No amendments are required to the Dublin General Plan and no rezonings are required to allow construction of anticipated dwellings. Future housing developments anticipated in the proposed Housing Element would be required to obtain subdivision maps, Site Development Review (SDR) permits, building permits and potentially other permits as applicable to individual housing sites from the City of Dublin. c) Conflict witli a habitat conservation plait or natural community conservation plan? NI. No such plan has been adopted within the City of Dublin. There would therefore be no impact to a habitat conservation plan or natural community conservation plan. 11. Mineral Resources Project Impacts City of Dublin Page 43 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 a, b) Result in the loss of availability of regionally or locally significant mineral resources? NI. No impacts would occur to any mineral resources, since no such resources are identified in the Dublin General Plan. 12. Noise Project Impacts a) Would the project expose persons or generation of noise levels in excess of standards established by the General Plan or other applicable standard: NNI. Construction of future dwellings in Dublin under the auspices of the proposed Housing Element could be located on sites in moderate to high noise level areas of the community, including but not limited to Dublin Boulevard, Tassajara Road, Fallon Road and other arterial and collector roads. Future housing development on those sites could expose future residents to noise levels in excess of noise standards established in the Noise Element of the General Plan. Other noise sources in the community include noise from BART operations and stationary noise sources associated with land uses and activities. The Eastern Dublin EIR addressed noise impacts for residential uses located in this portion of Dublin. A number of mitigation measures were included in the Eastern Dublin EIR to reduce noise to residential uses, as follows: Eastern Dublin EIR Mitigation Measure 3.10/1.0 reduced impacts to housing located along major roadways to a less-than-significant level by requiring developers of housing projects proposed within a future 60 decibel CNEL noise contour to complete an acoustic analysis to ensure that City and State noise standards can be achieved. This measure applies to future site-specific housing proposed on Housing Element sites within the Eastern Extended Planning Area. Mitigation Measure 3.10/3.0 for Impact 3.10/1) similarly requires acoustic analyses for housing sites near Parks RFTA for compliance with City noise exposure levels; however, even with this mitigation, Impact 3.10/1) was determined to be significant and unavoidable and a Statement of Overriding Considerations was approved (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). Mitigation Measure 3.10/6.0 requires the preparation of noise management plans for all mixed-use developments within the Eastern Extended Planning Area. The Eastern Dublin EIR also determined that residences in existence as of certification of the Eastern Dublin EIR would be subject to increased roadway noise and that mitigation of this impact to a less-than-significant level was infeasible (Impact 3.10/B). This significant and unavoidable impact was included in the Statement of Overriding Considerations that was adopted with approval of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan (City Council Resolution No. 53- 93). Future residential uses in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are subject to Mitigation Measure 3.7-3 contained in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan City of Dublin Page 44 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 EIR to reduce noise generated by mobile sources on residences to a less-than- significant level. This mitigation measure requires applicants for future development within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area to prepare site- specific noise studies to assess noise impacts and prepare appropriate noise reduction measures for such projects, including but not limited to setbacks from major noise sources, noise barriers, noise insulation and other features. Development of the housing units would result in no new or more severe significant noise impacts than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required b) Exposure of people to excessive growidbonie vibration or groundborne noise levels? NI. It is unlikely that construction of future housing units allowed under the proposed Housing Element would result in significant levels of vibration, since normal construction methods would be used. No impacts are anticipated with regard to this topic. c,d) Substantial permanent or teniporary increases iii permanent in ambient noise levels? LS. Future residential development in Dublin resulting from implementation of the proposed Housing Element could cause a temporary increase in ambient noise levels as a result of construction activities, including but not limited to demolition of existing structures (if needed), site grading and preparation, and construction activities. The Eastern Dublin EIR includes Mitigation Measures 3.10/4.0 and 5.0 to reduce construction noise impacts to a level of insignificance through preparation and submittal of Construction Noise Management Plans to ensure compliance with local noise standards. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR includes Mitigation Measure 3.7-1 to require all project developers in the downtown Dublin area to prepare and implement Construction Noise Management Plans to minimize noise to surrounding properties. Development of the housing sites must adhere to the Mitigation Measures cited above and there will be no new or more severe significant temporary noise impacts from construction activities related to future housing projects on sites identified in the proposed Housing Element than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. For potential permanent increases in noise levels, see item "a", above. e,f) Be located within an airport land use plan area, within two miles of a public or private airport or airstrip? NI. Several of the housing sites in the Eastern Extended Planning Area are within the Airport Influence Area (AIA) of Livermore Municipal Airport, and within two miles from this airport. As noted in the Eastern Dublin EIR, the 60 CNEL noise contour from the Livermore Municipal Airport does not extend into the Eastern Extended Planning area. None of the housing sites within the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are within two miles of a public or private airfield or airstrip. No impacts would result with respect to this topic. City of Dublin Page 45 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 13. Population and Housing Project Impacts a) Induce substantial population growth in an area, either directly or indirectly? NI. Residential development that could be facilitated as a result of adopting and implementing the proposed Housing Element would not cause substantial population growth in Dublin, since anticipated dwellings are currently included in the Dublin General Plan, applicable Specific Plans and regional growth projections. No impacts are anticipated. b,c) Would the project displace substantial numbers of existing housing units or people requiring replacement Housing? NI. Adoption of the proposed Housing Element and construction of residences pursuant to the proposed Element would not displace substantial numbers of people or residential dwellings. A majority of the sites in the Eastern Extended Planning Area are currently vacant or are occupied by a single residence. No existing housing would be displaced except as requested by the respective property owner, likely in connection with a future development application. Displacement of a significant number of housing units or population was not identified as a significant impact in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. No impacts are anticipated. 14. Public Services Environmental Impacts a) Fire protection? NNI. The City of Dublin contracts with the Alameda County Fire Department for fire suppression, emergency medical, rescue and fire inspection services. Additional housing that could be built in Dublin under the auspices of the proposed Housing Element could result in an increase in the number of calls for emergency services. The potential for increases in such calls as a result of additional housing development anticipated in the proposed Housing Element have been analyzed in earlier EIRs. These are identified in the Earlier Analysis section of this Initial Study. Identified impacts to the provision of fire service were reduced to a less-than- significant level in the Eastern Dublin EIR by adherence to Mitigation Measures 3.4/6.0 through 11.0. These measures require the timing of facilities to coincide with new service demand from development; establishment of appropriate funding mechanisms to cover up-front costs of capital fire improvements; acquisition of future fire stations in Eastern Dublin; and, incorporation of Fire Department safety recommendations into the design of all future individual development projects in Eastern Dublin. Future residential development in the Eastern Extended Planning Area is subject to the above Mitigation Measures to reduce fire service impacts to a City of Dublin Page 46 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 less-than-significant level. Future site-specific developments are also required to pay City of Dublin fire impact fees, which include funds to construct new local fire facilities. No significant police protection impacts were documented in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Overall, there will be no new or more severe significant impacts to police protection than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. b) Police protection? LS. Similar to fire service, there would likely be an increase in the number of calls for service to the Dublin Police Department based on an increase in residential development. The 1993 Eastern Dublin EIR included Mitigation Measure 3.4/1.0 that provides additional personnel and facilities and revisions to police beats as necessary in order to establish and maintain City standards for police protection service in Eastern Dublin. Mitigation Measures 3.4/3.0-5.0 reduced impacts to the Police Department by requiring incorporation of safety measures into the requirements of future development projects, appropriate budgeting of police services by the City and police review of individual development projects in the Eastern Dublin area. Future site-specific housing developments that could be facilitated under the proposed Housing Element are required to adhere to these police protection measures to ensure such impacts will be less-than-significant. Future residential developments are also required to pay City public facilities fees, a portion of which is intended to fund new police facilities. No significant police protection impacts were documented in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Overall, impacts to police protection are anticipated to be less-than-significant. c) Schools? LS. Public educational services in Dublin are provided by the Dublin Unified School District. The District maintains a number of K-12 schools throughout Dublin. There are also a number of private educational facilities in the community. Future residential development that could be facilitated by the proposed Housing Element would generate additional school-aged children that would need to be accommodated by local schools, however new residential development is subject to statutory school impact fees which will provide for new public educational facilities in the community. Therefore, impacts to schools are anticipated to be less-than-significant. d) Maintenance of public facilities, including roads? LS. Any new public facilities that would be constructed as part of any future housing development would be constructed to City standard so that a less than-significant impact would occur. e) Solid waste generation? LS. See item 17 (F-G), below. City of Dublin Page 47 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 15. Recreation Project Impacts a) Would the project increase the use of existing neighborhood or regional parks? NNI. New dwellings built as a result of the proposed Housing Element would require new or expanded parks in order to maintain the City's park goal. City park goals are to provide a total of 5 usable acres of parkland per 1,000 residents, which includes 3.5 acres of larger community parks per 1,000 residents and 1.5 acres of smaller neighborhood parks and squares per 1,000 residents. The City also encourages development of an integrated trail network and other open spaces which are not included in the park ratio goals (source: City of Dublin Parks and Recreation Master Plan, 2006). The City of Dublin requires housing developers to either dedicate parkland to the City to meet City goals or pay an in-lieu public facility fee that includes funding to allow the City to purchase parkland. Potential impacts with respect to increased demand for park facilities as a result of residential construction were analyzed in the Eastern Dublin EIR. Impact 3.4/K identified a potentially significant impact with demand for increased park facilities as a result of buildout of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area. A number of Mitigation Measures were included in the EIR to reduce this impact to a less-than-significant impact. Specifically, Mitigation Measures 3.4/20.0 through 28.0 addressed park mitigations. These measures called for the acquisition and development of additional parks in the Eastern Extended Planning Area, establishment of a continuous open space network that includes natural open spaces, and required preparation of a Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Future development of site-specific housing projects in the Eastern Extended Planning Area under the auspices of the proposed Housing Element is required to adhere to these measures. A less than significant impact to parks or recreational facilities was identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Overall, there would be no new or more significant impacts to parks and recreation facilities than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required. b) Does the project include recreational futilities or require the construction of recreational facilities? LS. As noted in the "a," above, the City of Dublin will require either dedication of parkland as part of new residential development or payment of park in-lieu fees. A less-than-significant impact is anticipated with regard to this topic. 16. Transportation/Traffic Project Impacts a, b) Cause an increase in traffic wliicli is substantial relative to existing traffic load and street, or exceed LOS standards establislied by the County CMA for designated roads? NNI. There would likely be increases in traffic on local roads, regional roads City of Dublin Page 48 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 and freeways as a result of the implementation of the proposed Housing Element. Impacts of local and regional traffic from residential development have been analyzed in the previous CEQA documents adopted by the City and are identified in the Earlier Analysis section of this document. Many impacts related to transportation and traffic can be mitigated to a less-than-significant level by construction of roadway and other transportation improvements; however, as noted below, a number of transportation impacts have been determined to be significant and unavoidable in previous CEQA documents. Impacts and mitigations from the Eastern Dublin FIR include: • Mitigation Measures 3.3/1.0 and 3.3/4.0 were adopted which reduced impacts on I-580 between Tassajara Road and Fallon Road and on I-680 north of I-580 to a level of insignificance (Impact 3.3/A and D). • Mitigation Measures 3.3/2.0, 2.1, 3.0 and 5.0 were adopted to reduce impacts on the remaining I-580 freeway segments and the I-580/680 interchange (Impacts 3.3/13, C and E). Even with mitigations, however, significant cumulative impacts remained on I-580 freeway segments between I-680 and Dougherty Road and, at the build-out scenario of 2010, on other segments of I-580 (Impact 3.3/B and E) and this impact was included in the Statement of Overriding Considerations (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). • Mitigation Measures 3.3/6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, 11.0 and 12.0 were adopted to reduce impacts to the Dougherty Road/Dublin Boulevard, Hacienda Drive/I-580 Eastbound Freeway Ramps, Tassajara Road/ I-580 Westbound Freeway Ramps, Santa Rita Road/I-580 Eastbound Freeway Ramps, Airway Boulevard/I-580 Westbound Freeway Ramps and along El Charro Road to a level of insignificance. These mitigations include construction of additional lanes at intersections, coordination with Caltrans and the neighboring cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to restripe, widen or modify on-ramps and off-ramps and interchange intersections, and coordination with Caltrans to modify certain interchanges. Development projects within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area are also required to contribute a proportionate share to the multi-jurisdictional improvements through the Eastern Dublin Traffic Impact Fee program and the Tri-Valley Transportation Development Fee program (Impacts 3.3/F, G, H I, K and Q. • Mitigation Measures 3.3/13.0 and 14.0 were adopted to reduce cumulative impacts on identified intersections with Dublin Boulevard and Tassajara Road (Impact 3.3/M and N). The identified improvements reduced Tassajara Road impacts to less than significant but Dublin Boulevard impacts remained significant and unavoidable due to road widening limitations. The impact at the Dublin Boulevard intersection was included in the Statement of Overriding Considerations (City Council Resolution No. 53-93). City of Dublin Page 49 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 • Mitigation Measures 3.3/15.0 to 15.3, 16.0 and 16.1 generally require coordination with transit providers to extend transit services and coincide pedestrian and bicycle paths with signals at major street crossings (Impact 3.3/0 and P). These mitigations reduced the impacts to less-than- significant. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan contains the following transportation and circulation impacts and mitigation measures: • Mitigation Measure 3.9-1 reduced impacts related to traffic increases on Metropolitan Transportation System (MTS) roadway segments in the downtown area in the near-term condition and cumulative condition (Impacts 3.9-1, -2 and -3) but not to a less-than-significant level. This measure requires the City to support Alameda County projects and programs to reduce traffic congestion, encourage downtown developers to implement Transportation Demand Management programs to reduce future vehicle use, implement pedestrian and bicycle improvements and collect Tri-Valley Transportation Development fees and local traffic impact fees to fund local transportation improvements. • Mitigation Measure 3.9-4 reduced Impact 3.9-4 to a less-than-significant level. Impact 3.9-4 noted an increase in transit demand based on new development in the downtown area. This mitigation measure requires the City to continue to support and work with the local transit providers (LAVTA) to develop appropriate routes and increased service based on future demand. With adherence to the previously adopted Mitigation Measures many traffic and transportation impacts related to the implementation of the Housing Element would be less-than-significant, although a number of cumulative impacts would remain significant and unavoidable. Future individual housing developments will also be required to pay traffic impact fees to the City to fund identified roadway and other transportation improvements. There would be no new or more severe significant impacts with respect to traffic increases on local or regional roads, or Alameda County Congestion Management Agency (CMA) roads than have been previous analyzed. No additional analysis is required. c) Result in a change of air traffic patterns? NI. The proposed project would have no impact on air traffic patterns, since it involves updating the Housing Element of the General Plan. d) Substantially increase liazards due to a design feature or incompatible use? LS. Future individual housing projects that would be proposed in Dublin that would assist in implementing the proposed Housing Element will be reviewed by the City of Dublin staff to ensure that City public works and engineering standards City of Dublin Page 50 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 are met and no traffic or transportation design hazards would be created. This would be a less-than-significant impact. e) Result in inadequate emergency access? NI. No impacts would occur with regard to emergency access. Residential development anticipated in the proposed Housing Element would be on lands planned for urban development and subject to City design standards for streets and other improvements. Furthermore, any future construction is routinely reviewed by the Dublin Police and Fire Departments to ensure that adequate emergency access is provided. f) Conflict witli adopted policies, plans or programs supporting alternative transportations modes? NI. As part of the normal and customary development review procedure, the City of Dublin will require the installation of sidewalks along adjacent roads if none exist, interior pathways, transit stops (as appropriate) and on-site bicycle parking facilities. Therefore, no impacts would result in terms of conflicts with policies, plans or programs supporting alternative transportation modes. 17. Utilities and Service Systems Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures a) Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the RWQCB? LS. Potentially significant impacts related to wastewater treatment capacity and consistency with Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) requirements were analyzed in the 1993 Eastern Dublin EIR and Impacts IM 3.5/A through E and G generally addressed the then lack of a wastewater service provider as well as lack of a collection, treatment and disposal system. These impacts were reduced to a less-than-significant level by adherence to Mitigation Measures 3.5/1.0a to 9.0 and 11.0 through 14.0 that required development of adequate wastewater services and adherence to the Dublin San Ramon Services District's Master Plan to upgrade the RWCQB-permitted capacity to accommodate planned growth in the Eastern Extended Planning Area. No significant impacts regarding wastewater treatment facilities were identified in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR. Future site-specific housing developments that could be accommodated under the proposed Housing Element are required to adhere to these Mitigation Measures as well as paying required wastewater fees to ensure this impact is less-than-si gnifi cant. b) Require new water or wastewater treatrzzezzt facilities or expansion of existing facilities? LS. The Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan provide for both water and wastewater improvements to serve future development proposed within these areas. CEQA documents identified in the City of Dublin Page 51 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Earlier Analysis section of this Initial Study analyzed the impacts of such facilities. All of the documents note that adherence to mitigation measures contained within each respective document will reduce impacts of new or expanded water or wastewater facilities to a less-than-significant level. c) Require iiew storni drainage facilities or expansion of existing facilities? NNI. See Hydrology section, 9d. d) Are sufficieut water supplies available? LS. The issue of an adequate long-term water supply for the Eastern Extended Planning Area was analyzed in the Eastern Dublin EIR. Impact 3.5/Q identified a potentially significant impact with an increased demand for water. The Eastern Dublin EIR included Mitigation Measures 3.5/26.0 to 31.0 to reduce this impact to a less-than- significant level. These measures required imposition of water conservation techniques, implementation of water recycling and adding water supply improvements. The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan EIR does not identify any significant impacts to water supplies. The primary "retail" supplier of water in Dublin, Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD), prepared a comprehensive update to their Urban Water Management Plan in 2010 to indicate that future site-specific development projects included in the Dublin General Plan could be supplied with an adequate amount of water. DSRSD has also commenced construction of a recycled (reclaimed) water supply system in the Eastern Dublin area that would supply non-potable irrigation water for future site-specific housing projects that could be accommodated by the proposed Housing Element. Consistent with DSRSD's utility master planning through its Urban Water Management Plan which anticipated development of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area and intensification of uses in Downtown Dublin, sufficient water supplies are expected to be available for future housing sites identified in the proposed Housing Element. e) Adequate wastewater capacity to serve the proposed project? LS. See item "a," above. f,g) Solid zoaste disposal? LS. Solid waste generation and disposal was found to be a potentially significant impact in the 1993 Eastern Dublin EIR (see Impact 3.4/O and P). Adherence to Mitigation Measures 3.7/37.0 through 40 reduced this impact to a less-than-significant level. These measures required preparation of a solid waste management plan and updating of the City's Source Reduction and Recycling Element/Household Hazardous Waste Element. The DDSP EIR identified generation of solid waste as less than significant. There would be no new or more severe significant impacts related to solid waste disposal than identified in the prior EIRs and no additional analysis is required City of Dublin Page 52 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 18. Mandatory Findings of Significance a) Does the project have the potential to degrade the duality of the euvirounieut, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self-sustaining levels, threateu to eliminate a plant or animal conu7nlfiity, reduce the number of or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory? No. The preceding analysis indicates that the proposed project would not have a significant adverse impact on cultural resources or have the potential to restrict the range of rare or endangered species, beyond impacts previously identified. b) Does the project have impacts that are individually limited, but civiudatively considerable? ("Cumulatively considerable" means that the incremental effects of a project are considerable when viewed in connection with the effects of past projects, the effects of other current projects and the effects of probable future projects). No, cumulative impacts of the proposed project have been analyzed in previous CEQA documents as identified in the Earlier Analysis section of this Initial Study. c) Does the project have environniental effects which will cause substantial adverse effects on human beings, either directly or indirectly? No. Based on the preceding Initial Study, no substantial effects to human beings, either directly or indirectly have been identified. City of Dublin Page 53 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014 Initial Study Preparers Jerry Haag, Urban Planner, project manager and principal author Jane Maxwell, report graphics Agencies and Organizations Consulted The following agencies and organizations were contacted in the course of this Initial Study: City of Dublin Luke Sims, Community Development Director Jeff Baker, Assistance Community Development Director Marnie Delgado, Senior Planner Jayson Imai, Senior Civil Engineer Kit Faubion, Assistant City Attorney References Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (SCH # 91103064, May 10, 1993). Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (SCH #20100022005, December 2010). Eastern Dublin Scenic Corridor Policies and Standards, June 1996 Dublin General Plan, June 2013 Eastern Dublin Specific Plan, January 19, 2010 Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, December 2010 Bay Area Air Quality Management District's Clean Air Plan, September 15, 2010 Climate Action Plan, City of Dublin, updated July 2013 Eastern Alameda County Conservation Strategy (EACCS), October 2010 California Department of Toxic Substances Control, website, July 2014 Parks and Recreation Master Plan, City of Dublin, 2006 update Dublin San Ramon Services District, Urban Water Management Plan, 2010 Update City of Dublin Page 54 Initial Study/2015-23 Housing Element Update September 2014