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05-13-2014 - Agenda PacketPlanning Commission Regular Meeting City of Dublin May 13, 2014 City Council Chambers 7:00 P.M. 100 Civic Plaza 1. CALL TO ORDER & ROLL CALL 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG 3. ADDITIONS OR REVISIONS TO THE AGENDA 4. MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETINGS – April 29, 2014 5. ORAL COMMUNICATION - At this time, members of the public may address the Planning Commission on any non-agendized item(s) of interest to the public. In accordance with State Law, no action or discussion may take place on any item not appearing on the Planning Commission agenda. The Planning Commission may respond briefly to statements made or questions posed, or may request Staff to report back at a future meeting concerning the matter. Any member of the public may contact the Assistant Community Development Director regarding proper procedure to place an item on a future Planning Commission agenda. 6. CONSENT CALENDAR 7. WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS 8. PUBLIC HEARINGS 8.1 PLPA-2014-00008 - Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion - Site Development Review, Planned Development Rezoning and related Stage 2 Development Plan Amendment, and CEQA Addendum. 9. NEW OR UNFINISHED BUSINESS 9.1 PLPA-2013-00031 - Update to the Housing Element of the General Plan 10. OTHER BUSINESS: Brief INFORMATION ONLY reports from the Planning Commission and/or Staff, including Committee Reports and Reports by the Planning Commission related to meetings attended at City Expense (AB 1234). 11. ADJOURNMENT This AGENDA is posted in accordance with Government Code Section 54954.2(a) and Government Code Section 54957.5 If requested, pursuant to Government Code Section 54953.2, this agenda shall be made available in appropriate alternative formats to persons with a disability, as required by Section 202 of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. Section 12132), and the federal rules and regulations adopted in implementation thereof. To make a request for disability -related modification or accommodation, please contact the City Clerk’s Office (925) 833-6650 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting. A complete packet of information containing Staff Reports (Agenda Statements) and exhibits related to each item is available for public review at least 72 hours prior to a Planning Commission Meeting or, in the event that it is delivered to the Commission members less than 72 hours prior to a Planning Commission Meeting, as soon as it is so delivered. The packet is available in the Community Development Depart ment. (OVER FOR PROCEDURE SUMMARY) OF STAFF REPORT 4 82 PLANNING COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING: PLPA-2014-00008. Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion - Site Development Review, Planned Development Rezoning and related Stage 1/2 Development Plan Amendment, and CEQA Addendum. Report prepared by Kristi Bascom, Principal Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Applicant is requesting approval of Site Development Review, an amendment to the Stage 1/2 Planned Development Zoning District, and approval of a CEQA Addendum to accommodate a new 13,102 square foot, two-story cafeteria and science building and a future expansion area of up to 4,000 square feet in Building 1 on the existing 10 acre school site. The Planning Commission will review the proposed project and will make a recommendation to the City Council. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission: 1) Receive Staff presentation; 2) Open the public hearing; 3) Take testimony from the Applicant and the public; 4) Close the public hearing and deliberate; and 5) Adopt the following Resolutions: a) Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a CEQA Addendum for the Quarry, Lane School Phase III expansion at 6363 Tassajara Road; b) Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance amending the Zoning Map to rezone the Quarry Lane School site to a Planned Development Zoning District and approving the related Stage 1/2 Development Plan Amendment for the Quarry Lane SchooR Phase III expansion; and c) Resolution recommending that the City Council approve Site Development Review for a new 13,102 square foot building at Quarry Lane School. Submitted By: iewed By: Kristi Bascom Baker Principal Planner Assistant Community Development Director .COPY TO: File ITEM NO.: $' Page 1 of 8 G:1PA#120141PLPA-2014-00008 Quarry Lane SDR, PD Amendmentk05.13.2014 PC MtgTCSR.docx DESCRIPTION Background The project site is approximately ten acres of land located on the east side of Tassajara Road approximately 1.75 miles north of 1-580. The project location is shown below: Figure 1: Project Location The adjacent property to the north is currently a single-family home and Tassalara Road ranch that will soon be demolished and redeveloped with a 36-unit Fallon Road subdivision approved in 2010. The adjacent property to the south is designated Medium Density Residential (6.1 to 14 units per acre) x , and is currently occupied by a 6 quarry Line single-family home, landscape School contracting business, and landscape 's nursery. n_`a In April 1999, prior to the site being annexed to the City of Dublin, Alameda County approved a Planned Development District to allow the development of the first phase of the Quarry Lane School, consisting of a 15,600-square-foot building for day care, preschool and elementary school grades with a maximum enrollment of 200 students. A programmatic Environmental Impact Report was certified by the County at that time for the Quarry Lane School Master Plan. On December 19, 2000, the City Council approved the Planned Development (PD) District Pre- zoning and Annexation application for Quarry Lane School Phase II (City Council Ordinance 24- 00 — Attachment 1). The application was for a substantial increase to the amount of development on site to allow an additional 66,685 square feet to construct a middle school and high school building, recreation areas, landscaping and grading. This would allow Quarry Lane to expand from 200 students (daycare, preschool, and elementary school) to a population of 950 students that would include middle school and high school ages as well. The school use, maximum student population, ultimate building envelope, site layout, extent of grading, and architectural plans were approved by the City at this time. On May 25, 2004, the Planning Commission approved Resolution 04-46 (Attachment 2), which included a minor amendment to the Stage 2 Development Plan and Site Development Review. The application requested Site Development Review to construct Phase II, which included construction of 70,289 square feet of new building area (an increase from the 66,685 square feet approved in 2000) and associated sports fields and playground areas to serve the middle and high school facilities. The project also included other minor site revisions. While the building area increased, the total maximum student population remained at 950 students. 2 of 8 Proposed Project The Phase III expansion of Quarry Lane School includes the construction of a new 13,102 square foot cafeteria and science building and the allowance for a future expansion of up to 4,000 square feet in Building 1 to accommodate an expanded stage and performance area at some point in the future. The application includes a request for Site Development Review approval for the cafeteria and science building (no Site Development Review request for the future Building 1 expansion area) and a Planned Development Rezoning and related Stage 1/2 Development Plan amendment to increase the overall amount of development allowed on the school site. ANALYSIS The analysis below describes the various components of the project and provides a comparison between the existing Planned Development Zoning District and related Stage 1/2 Development Plan and the proposed amendments. PLANNED DEVELOPMENT REZONING AND RELATED STAGE 1/2 DEVELOPMENT PLAN AMENDMENT: The current proposal is to increase the amount of development permitted on site from 85,889 square feet (per the 2004 Stage 2 Development Plan approval) to 110,602 square feet and increase the allowable Floor to Area Ration (FAR) from .219 to .253. Table 1 below describes the factors in the proposed increase. Table 1: Project Description Square Status Description Feet Phase 1 15,600 Existing Allowed per Development Plan 2000 Phase II 70,289 Existing Allowed per amended Development Plan 2004 Subtotal 85,889 Total allowed per Development Plan 2004 Existing building purchased by Quarry Lane and added to school campus (but never added to the Stage 2 Building One 7,611 Existing Development Plan total Subtotal 7,611 Additional development existing on-site 2014 New Cafeteria/ Proposed Stage 2 Development Plan Amendment and Science Building 13,102 Proposed Site Development Review SDR Building 1: Proposed Stage 1/2 Development Plan Amendment future addition 4,000 Proposed I — no SDR Subtotal 17,102 Total Additional Development proposed on site TOTAL 110,602 Proposed Stage 1/2 Development Plan Amendment Although the amount of developable building area is proposed to increase, the intensity of use of the site is not proposed to change in that the total maximum student population, the maximum number of faculty and staff members, and the number of classrooms are not proposed to increase. The proposed additional building area (in the form of the new cafeteria/science building and the future expansion to Building 1) is intended to serve the existing student population. 3 of 8 The existing Stage 2 Development Plan and the proposed (amended) Stage 1/2 Development Plan are compared below in Table 2. Table 2: Existing and Proposed Development Plans Project Approved Proposed Component Development Plan Development Plan Difference (Phase II: 2004) (Phase III: 2014) Max. Student 950 950 None Population Max. Faculty 55 55 None and Staff Classrooms 51 51 None Total Building Increase of 24,713 SF Area (Square 85,889 SF 110,602 (7,611 SF Existing Bldg. 1 + 13,102 Feet) New Bldg. + 4,000 SF Bldg. 1 future expansion area) Floor to Area 219 (maximum) .253 Increase of .034 Ratio Parking 149 spaces 149 spaces None Spaces Maximum 59 feet 59 feet None Bldg. Height The addition of 7,611 square feet in Building 1 to the Total Building Area is a result of the school's acquisition of the building and site, which existed on a separate parcel and served as a special events center ("Villa Tassajara") for many years. In 1997, Quarry Lane School acquired the site and parcel and incorporated the building into the school campus, utilizing the building for administrative purposes, library, and kitchen functions. This is not newly-constructed building area, but it is building area that had not been previously accounted for in the Quarry Lane School Development Plan. The Total Building Area and FAR are proposed to increase, but all other elements of the Stage 1/2 Development Plan remain the same. The Resolution recommending approval of the Planned Development Rezoning and related Stage 1/2 Development Plan amendments is included as Attachment 3 to this staff report and the City Council Ordinance itself is included as Exhibit A to Attachment 3. The Stage 1/2 Development Plan, as amended, is included in its entirety in the Ordinance. SITE DEVELOPMENT REVIEW: The school campus is on a property that has a substantial upwards slope from west to east. The site topography results in several different levels being created and the use of many retaining walls to create flat spaces for parking and recreation areas. The school campus currently has three buildings, as shown in Figure 2: 4of8 • Building 1 (Office/Library/Kitchen building) is 7,611 square feet and is closest to Tassajara Road and near the main entry. This building was a separate special events facility before the school acquired it in 1997 and made it a part of the campus. • Building 2 (Preschool and Elementary School building) is 15,578 square feet and was the first building constructed specifically for Quarry Lane School. • Building 3 (Middle and High School building) is 70,701 square feet and was the! Phase II expansion of the school that was permitted in 2004. Figure 2: Site Plan yo / /,i lg1a rat£ 1.W LOCxfA c.�qE Building Three ) I �! 4 s a _ 1 • r r, r R°—a � 4 � � � ° { " >x al x c mclc c c c c (E)PI.V.- J -p ' ' WTWCUVJW III 61 r —— ♦1 -->as—.Ilc -,Ilc—>a —.xa --. -- i'//''f��1 V(— �d� —y `-n l I 1� / ,✓ (a) ° I. (E) E;wp w,gh Building Two ,bo uarpt� T - ----- - Future Building I' if _ I rI bo k7ao .aa ww. RweaaEauixwa Building One t la. I E (C 11 0' r r o e e o o e e ra -- VOl'JM1 t6E Sti150 �_ - --- Ip yp _: -...- ... 119.--. • --- 1h45AUM ROAD ° -:a' fo' W MI nE1�� -' The proposed two-story cafeteria and science building would be constructed on a portion of the site that is between the two-story Building 1 and an upper parking lot. There will be limited visibility of the new building from Tassajara Road. The area is currently occupied by a storage shed, outdoor eating area for students, and a commercial walk-in refrigerator. These structures will be removed prior to construction. Sheet AS1.1 of the Project Plans (Exhibit A to Attachment: 4) illustrates the location of the proposed building. The colors and materials of the new building will match those of the Buildings 2 and 3, including the standing seam metal roof with decorative eave corbels and a simple cement plaster finish painted to match the existing buildings. The window design and placement will also complement the other buildings on the school campus. The last sheet of the Project Plans (Exhibit A to Attachment 4) provides color and material details. There are seven trees that are proposed to be removed from the project site, including four eucalyptus, two redwoods (with trunk diameters of 10 inches and 12 inches) and one Mexican 5 of 8 fan palm tree. These trees are located in areas that are to receive significant grading. All other landscaping is to remain on site, and the newly-created slope areas are to be planted with groundcover. The Resolution recommending City Council approval of the Site Development Review application is included as Attachment 4 to this staff report. CONFORMANCE WITH GENERAL PLAN AND EASTERN DUBLIN SPECIFIC PLAN The project is within the Medium Density and Open Space land use designation of the Dublin General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. The proposed Quarry Lane Phase II development is consistent with those designations because the school is a type of community facility, and community facilities are an allowed use in all land use categories. The site layout protects the undisturbed hillside in the northeastern portion of the site consistent with the Open Space land use designation. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW Environmental review for the project area was previously conducted and documented in the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, which was adopted in 1993 and has a certified Program Environmental Impact Report (EIR) (SCH No. 91103064) and analyzed in the Quarry Lane Master Plan, which was adopted in 1998 by the County of Alameda and has a certified EIR (SCH No. 97122109). In 2000, the City Council approved a Planned Development District Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan for the construction of Phase II of Quarry Lane School, and adopted an Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration (City Council Resolution 204-00). In 2004, the Planning Commission approved Site Development Review, a Conditional Use Permit, and adopted a CEQA Addendum to allow the construction of Phase II of Quarry Lane School and the associated minor amendments to the approved Development Plan (Planning Commission Resolution 04-46. Pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15162, the City of Dublin prepared an Initial Study (Exhibit A to Attachment 5) to determine if additional environmental review was required for the Project beyond the prior EIRs and Mitigated Negative Declaration. The Initial Study determined that the project would not require major revisions to the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration because the Project would not have new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects. Because the overall site building envelope, amount of urbanized area, and student and staff population were unchanged, the impacts and appropriate mitigations are the same and no new mitigations are required. Furthermore, the Initial Study determined that there was no change in circumstances that would result in new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects because no new or unanticipated circumstances have developed since the previous EIRs were certified, the previous Mitigated Negative Declaration was adopted, and the previous Addendum was adopted. Based on the Initial Study, an Addendum was prepared documenting these facts. The Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a CEQA Addendum for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion is included as Attachment 5 to this Staff Report. 6 of 8 NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH A notice of this public hearing was published in the newspaper, mailed to all property owners and tenants within 300 feet of the project area boundaries, and all persons who have expressed an interest in being notified of actions related to this project were notified via email. The Staff Report for this public hearing was also available on the City's website. ATTACHMENTS: 1) City Council Ordinance 24-00 2) Planning Commission Resolution 04-46 3) Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance amending the Zoning Map to rezone the Quarry Lane School site to a Planned Development Zoning District and approving the related Stage 1/2 Development Plan amendments for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion, with the Draft City Council Ordinance included as Exhibit A 4) Resolution recommending that the City Council approve Site Development Review for a new 13,102 square foot building at Quarry Lane School, with the Project Plans included as Exhibit A 5) Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt a CEQA Addendum for the Quarry Land School Phase III expansion at 6363 Tassajara Road, with the Addendum and Initial Study included as Exhibit A 7of8 GENERAL INFORMATION: APPLICANT/PROPERTY OWNER: Dr. Sabri Arac, President, Quarry Lane School, 6363 Tassajara Road, Dublin, CA 94568 LOCATION: 6363 Tassajara Road (Assessor's Parcel Number: 985-0002-006-03 ZONING: Planned Development GENERAL PLAN: Medium Density Residential (6.1-14 units/acre) SURROUNDING USES: LOCATION ZONING GENERAL PLAN LAND USE CURRENT USE OF PROPERTY North PD Single Family Residential Single Family Home and Ranch South PD Medium Density Residential Single Family Home and Landscape Contractor East PD Open Space Open Space West PD Semi Public, Parks and Public Open Space, Regional Park Recreaton 8 of 8 ORDINANCE NO. 24 - 00 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO PREZONE PROPERTY LOCATED ON THE EAST SIDE OF TASSAJARA ROAD, IN ALAMEDA COUNTY, ADJACENT TO DUBLIN'S NORTHERN CITY LIMITS (APN 986-0002-006-01, 005-01 AND 005-02) TO A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT AND ADOPTING A DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THE QUARRY LANE SCHOOL(PA-99-064) WHEREAS, the applicant,Dr. Sabri Arac of Quarry Lane School has requested approval of a Planned Development (PD)Prezoning and Annexation of an area of approximately 15 acres generally located north of the City Limits at 6363 and 6237 Tassajara Road within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area(APN: 985-0002-006-01, 985-0002-005-01 and 005-02.); and WHEREAS, the applicant has requested approval of a Planned Development Prezone and Development Plan for the development of Phase 2 of Quarry Lane School involving 66,600 square feet of floor area to accommodate new classrooms, a gymnasium and new recreational play fields on approximately 10 acres of land located at 6363 Tassajara Road (APN: 985-0002-006-01) and a Planned Development Prezone for the Kobold property to allow future residential and open space uses on approximately 3.7 acres of land located at 6237 Tassajara Road (APN: 985-0002-005-01 and 005-02.) within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area; WHEREAS, the Applicant has submitted a complete application for a Planned Development Prezone (Exhibit A-1), including a Development Plan for the Quarry Lane School(Exhibits A-2 & A-3) as required by Chapter 8.32 and 8.120 of Title 8 of the Dublin Municipal Code which meets the requirements of said Chapter; and WHEREAS, the site will be prezoned to "Planned Development"; and WHEREAS, the potential environmental effects of the proposed project have been previously addressed in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan EIR(SCH No. 91-103064); and WHEREAS, an Initial Study has been prepared for the project to evaluate site-specific impacts of the project pursuant to CEQA guidelines Section 15168. Based on the Initial Study, a Mitigated Negative Declaration and Mitigated Monitoring Program has been prepared for the project with the finding that with the implementation of Mitigation Measures previously adopted for the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan EIR and with site specific Mitigation Measures contained in the Initial Study,the potential site-specific impacts of the project would be reduced to a level of insignificance. The Eastern Dublin Specific Plan EIR and Initial Study adequately describe the impacts of the project, and there have been no substantial changes or new information that would be outside the scope of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan EIR; and WHEREAS, a total of four letters commenting on the Mitigated Negative Declaration were received during the public comment period; and WHEREAS, all pertinent comments have been responded to and have become part of the Response to Comments attached as Attachment 9 to the Staff Report for PA 99-064; and ATTACHMENT 1 WHEREAS,the Planning Commission did hold a properly noticed public hearing on said applications on August 8 and 22, 2000, and did adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council approve a Planned Development Prezone and Development Plan for Quarry Lane School and a Planned Development Prezone for the Kobold Property (PA 99-064); and WHEREAS, a properly noticed public hearing was held by the City Council on November 21, December 5, and December 19, 2000; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending that the City Council approve the application; and - - - - WHEREAS, on December 5, 2000 the City Council adopted a Mitigated Negative Declaration, Mitigation Monitoring Program and Response to Comments for PA 99-064; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 8.32.070 and 8.120.050 of the Dublin Municipal Code,the City Council makes the following findings regarding said proposed Planned Development Prezone/Development Plan for Quarry Lane School: 1. The proposed Planned Development Prezone meets the intent and purpose of Chapter 8.32 of the Zoning Ordinance because it provides a comprehensive Development Plan which will create a desirable use of land and an environment that will be sensitive to surrounding land uses by virtue of the layout and design of the site plan; and 2. The Planned Development Prezone will be appropriate for the subject property in terms of setting forth the purpose, applicable provisions of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance, range of permitted and conditionally permitted uses and Development Standards, which will be compatible with existing and proposed residential and open space uses in the immediate vicinity and will enhance the development of the Specific Plan Area; and 3. The Planned Development Prezone will provide for the development of future phases of the Quarry Lane School on land designated by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan for Medium Density Residential and Rural Residential/Agricultural land uses. The Eastern Dublin Specific Plan envisions this area denoted as subarea G: Foothill Residential in the Specific Plan to be developed with predominantly residential and open space uses as well as uses including public schools and parks; it is therefore appropriate for schools, both public and private to be located in residential neighborhoods in close proximity to the students they serve;the project is consistent with the general provisions, intent, and purpose of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and will contribute towards implementation of said Plan; and 4. The Planned Development Prezone is consistent with the general provisions, intent, and purpose of the PD Zoning District of the Zoning Ordinance in that it contains all information required by Section 8.32 of the Zoning Ordinance and accomplishes the objectives of Section 8.32.010, A through H, of the Zoning Ordinance; and 5. The Planned Development Prezone will provide efficient use of land and will preserve an area of open space and undisturbed hillside along the north and primarily the northeast corner of the property; and will be compatible with and enhance the general development of the area; and will create an attractive, efficient and safe environment and physically suitable for the type and intensity of the zoning and uses proposed, and 6. The Planned Development Prezone will not have a substantial adverse effect on health or safety or be substantially detrimental to the public welfare or be injurious to property or public improvement, as all applicable regulations will be met; and 7. The Planned Development Prezone will not overburden public services or facilities as all agencies must commit to the availability of Public Services prior to the issuance of any building permits as required by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan policies and Mitigation Measures; and 8. The Planned Development Prezone will be consistent with the policies of the Dublin General Plan and the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan; and 9. The Planned Development Prezone will benefit the public necessity, convenience and general welfare; and 10. The adopted Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Mitigation Monitoring Program and the additional site specific mitigation measures identified in the Initial Study (Attachment 6 to Staff Report) will apply to the Project, as the reporting and monitoring program required by Public Resources Code 21081.6 for the Project WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 8.32.070 and 8.120.050 and 8.120.110 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council makes the following findings regarding said proposed Planned Development Prezone for the Kobold property: 1. The Planned Development Prezone will be appropriate for the subject property in terms of setting forth the purpose, applicable provisions of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance,range of permitted and conditionally permitted uses, which will be compatible with existing and proposed residential,private school and open space uses in the immediate vicinity and will enhance the development of the Specific Plan Area; and 2. The Planned Development Prezone is consistent with the general provisions, intent, and purpose of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan because the prezoning will establish land uses and densities allowed by the Specific Plan and will contribute towards implementation of said Plan; and 3. The Planned Development Prezone will provide efficient use of land and will preserve an area designated for open space uses along the southern portion of the property to preserve the creek corridor and provide passive recreational areas;will be compatible with and enhance the general development of the area; and will create an attractive, efficient and safe environment; and 4. The Planned Development Prezone will not have a substantial adverse effect on health or safety,or be substantially detrimental to the public welfare or be injurious to property or public improvement, as all applicable regulations will be met; and 5. The Planned Development Prezone will not overburden public services or facilities as all agencies must commit to the availability of Public Services prior to the issuance of any building permits as required by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan policies and Mitigation Measures; and 6. The Planned Development Prezone will be consistent with the policies of the Dublin General Plan; and 7. The Planned Development Prezone will benefit the public necessity, convenience and general welfare; and 8. The Planned Development Prezone is within the scope of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Final EIR. WHEREAS, the City Council did hear and use their independent judgment and considered all said reports, recommendations and testimony hereinabove set forth. NOW, THEREFORE,the Dublin City Council does ordain as follows: Section 1: Pursuant to Chapter 8.32, Title 8 of the City of Dublin Municipal Code the City of Dublin Zoning Map is amended to prezone the following property("the Property")to a Planned Development Zoning District: Approximately 13.7 acres of land generally located on the east side of Tassajara Road, in Alameda County, adjacent to Dublin's northern city limits at 6363 and 6237 Tassjara Road, more specifically described as Assessor's Parcel Numbers: 985-0002-006-01, 985-0002-005-01 and 005-02. A map of the rezoning area is shown below: VICINITY MAP N.T.S. iy CA��t ee cm umt L P�etr°a9 cm uurr uxe Site & DUBLIN / CIMON ROAD 8 m �z DUBLIN BOUL6YARD w 1-580 a F N pr>a AcANTON SECTION 2. 1. Planned Development Prezone and Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan - Quarry Lane School. The regulations of the use, development, improvement, and maintenance of the Quarry Lane School Property shall be as depicted on the Prezoning Exhibit (Exhibit A-10 hereto) and as set forth in the Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan (Exhibits A-2 & A-3, hereto)which are hereby approved. Any amendments to the Stage 1 and 2 Development Plans shall be in accordance with Section 8.32.080 of the Dublin Municipal Code or its successors. 2. Planned Development Prezone-Kobold property The regulations of the use of the Kobold property shall be as depicted on the Prezoning Exhibit (Exhibit A-1, hereto). Regulations for the improvement, and maintenance of the Kobold property shall be established in a Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan which is required to be submitted in accordance with Section 8.32 of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance. No development shall occur on this property until a Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan has been adopted by the City. The Development Plan shall comply with the policies and requirements of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. 3, Planned Development Prezone—Land Use Designations—Kobold property: 1. PD—Medium Density Intent: Medium Density land use designations are established to: a) reserve appropriately located areas for family living in a variety of types of dwellings at a reasonable range of population densities consistent with sound standards of public health and safety;b) ensure adequate light, air, privacy and open space for each dwelling unit and c) accommodate single-family and multi-family housing, including a range of detached, zero-lot line, duplex, townhouse and garden apartment development. Intensity: 6.1 — 14.0 dwelling units per acre Permitted Uses: a. One-family dwellings b. Multi-family dwellings C. Combinations of attached or detached dwellings, zero-lot line units, duplexes, or townhouses d. Accessory structures and uses located on the same site as a permitted use. Conditional Uses: a. Bed and Breakfast Inn b. Boarding House C. Community facility d. Community Clubhouse e. Plant nursery or greenhouse used for the cultivation of plant materials (wholesale only) f. Community care facility large g. Day Care Center h. Large family day care home 2. PD --Open Space Intent: Open Space land use designations are established to provide for the preservation of natural resources, outdoor recreational activities, and public health and safety. Permitted Uses: a. Public and private Open Space uses: including areas for open space preservation of natural resources; outdoor recreation-passive; stream corridor;trails. 3. Interim Agricultural Designnation Intent: Interim agricultural designations shall be established for this property. This interim land use designation allows the existing residential and agricultural uses approved under Alameda County's Zoning Ordinance to remain until such time the landowner of this property applies for a Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan in accordance with Section 8.32 of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance Regulations and Standards Governing the Interim Agricultural Zoning Designation: a. As specifically provided by the Interim Agricultural Designations, all applicable and general requirements of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance shall be applied to this land use designation. b. The Agricultural Districts(A Districts) provisions of the Alameda County Zoning Ordinance shall apply to properties within the Interim Agricultural land use designation. C. All properties with the Interim Agricultural land use designation shall conform to Section 8.140 of the Zoning Ordinance relating to legal non- conforming uses and buildings. 4. Dublin Zoning Ordinance—Applicable Requirements—Kobold property: Except as specifically modified by the provisions of the PD District, all applicable and general requirements of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance shall be applied to this PD District. 5. Dublin Unified School District- Quarry Lane School and Kobold properties: The General Plan Policy 4.1 states that"schools located within the city should be operated by the Dublin Unified School District". It is the intent of the City that the boundaries of the Dublin School District should be coterminous with the City limits. The property owners within this annexation area shall cooperate and actively work with other property owners within the City of Dublin's Sphere of Influence to initiate and complete the detachment process from the Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District and annexation process to the Dublin Unified School District. SECTION 3. Except as provided in SECTION 2. above, the use, development, improvement and maintenance of the Property shall be governed by the provisions of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance. SECTION 4. This Ordinance shall take effect and be enforced thirty(30) days from and after the date of its passage. The City Clerk of the City of Dublin shall cause this Ordinance to be posted in at least three (3) public places in the City of Dublin in accordance with Section 36933 of the Government Code of the State of California. PASSED AND ADOPTED BY the City Council of the City of Dublin, on this 19''day of December, 2000, by the following votes: AYES: Councilmembers Lockhart and Oravetz and Mayor Houston NOES: Councilmembers McCormick and Zika ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None Mayor ATTEST: City rk K2/G/12-19-00 ord-quany.doc (Item 6.2) g:\PA99-064\rezord.doc I 100X05 3Nr AbbvnO:HOb w.., v."•�rte; t/ VINHOJI'M 'A.LNf100 V03WVIV 'NOlNV8tl3ld d0 Alm % sa�rlaossy uasuaa[`, -IOOHOS .3NV-1 AHHvno ��a88na IISIHX3 ONINOZ-3Hd 1 N a d F w W �i J � �=i � li. I II'�•� ;i�� �.� C DEVELOPMENT PLAN - QUARRY LANE SCHOOL (PA 99-064) This is a Development Plan pursuant to Chapter 8.32 of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance for the Quarry Lane School project, located at 6363 Tassajara Road (APN 985-0002-006-01). This Development Plan meets all of the requirements for Stage 1 and Stage 2 review of the project. This Development Plan is also represented by the, Site, Landscape and Architectural Plans, sheets dated June 14, 2000 labeled Exhibit A-3 to the Ordinance approving this Development Plan (City Council Ordinance No. 00- _), and on file in the Planning Department. The Planned Development District allows the flexibility needed to encourage innovative development while ensuring that the goals,policies, and action programs of the General Plan, Downtown Dublin Specific Plan, and provisions of Section 8.32 of the Zoning Ordinance are satisfied. 1. Zoning: This PD Planned Development Zoning District is to provide for and regulate the development of a private school. (General Plan land use designations: Medium Density Residential and Rural Residential/Agriculture) 2. Permitted Uses: The following are uses permitted for this site: a. Private School: 1. Kindergarten through High School Grades 2. After school care 3. Recreational Play fields b. Similar and related uses as determined by the Director of Community Development Conditional Uses: All conditional uses in the Dublin Zoning Ordinance for the R-1 Residential Zoning District are conditional uses in this PD/R-1 District. 3. Dublin Zoning Ordinance -Applicable Requirements: Except as specifically modified by the provisions of this PD District Rezone/Development Plan,all applicable general requirements and procedures of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance shall be applied to the land uses designated in this PD District Rezone. 4. Site Plan &Architecture: See attached site and elevation plans contained in Exhibit A- 3, Development Plan. This Development Plan applies to the 10-acre site shown on this plan at 6363 Tassajara Road. Any modifications to the project shall be substantially consistent with these plans and of equal or superior materials and design quality. EXHIBIT A-2 G:\pa99064\devp1an 1 5. Density: The maximum square footage of the proposed development and total number of proposed students under this Development Plan (as shown on the site plan) is as follows: 15, 578 square feet(currently under construction under the jurisdiction of Alameda County) and 66, 685 square feet(proposed); 950 students total (200 kindergarten students, 600 elementary and middle school students and 150 high school students) 6. Phasing PIan. The project will be constructed in one phase. 7. Landscaping Plan. Refer to attached landscaping plan included in Exhibit A-3 , Development Plan, Sheet 7. 8. Development Standards: Lot Size and Dimensions: N/A Front,Rear, and Side Yard Setbacks: Setback standards for this District shall be as shown on the Site Plan in Exhibit A-3, Development Plan. Building Height: 59' maximum, as shown on the elevation plan in Exhibit A-3, Development Plan Floor Area Ratio: The FAR within this district shall not exceed .21 Parking/Garages: Parking shall be provided in accordance with Section 8.76.080 C of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance, as shown on the site plan in Exhibit A-3, Development Plan. In the event that the proposed preliminary road alignment for Tassajara Road is altered, the Applicant shall demonstrate that the site is adequately parked in compliance with the Dublin Zoning Ordinance, prior to the issuance of a Site Development Review permit. 9. Development Agreement: The Applicant/Developer shall enter into a Development Agreement with the City of Dublin, prior to issuance of a building permit, which shall contain, but not be limited to, provisions for financing and timing of on and off-site infrastructure,payment of traffic, noise and public facilities impact fees and other provisions deemed necessary by the City to find the project consistent with, the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. 10. General Provisions: The developer shall be required to pay a Public Facilities Fee in the amounts and at the times set forth in City of Dublin Resolution No. 60-99, adopted by the City Council on April 6, 1999, or in the amounts and at the times set forth in any resolution revising the amount of the Public Facilities Fee, as implemented by the Administrative Guidelines adopted by Resolution 195-99. G:\pa99064\devp1an 2 � zz C) d y z a w g a. 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FF Id T _ c 1 I ® I l p 9 I / II • s e o m s m� .�m o�m . �o�m m i• � f- � �m • m. tp.m.-` I I t a e 4 RESOLUTION NO. 04-46 A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN APPROVING CEQA ADDENDUM, STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS,SITE DEVELOPMENT REVIEW,AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR MINOR AMENDMENTS TO BUILDING SIZE,RETAINING WALL DESIGN AND PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR QUARRY LANE SCHOOL PHASE II AT 6363 TASSAJARA ROAD,PA 99-064 WHEREAS, Dr. Sabri Arac for Quarry Lane School has requested approval of Site Development Review and a Conditional Use Permit for amendments to building size, retaining wall design, and parking requirements of the Planned Development District PD 99-064; and WHEREAS,the Dublin Zoning Ordinance Sections 8.32 Planned Development Regulations requires that the Planning Commission may approve minor amendments to an adopted Development Plan by means of a Conditional Use Permit upon a finding that the amendment substantially complies with and does not materially change the provisions or intent of the adopted Planned Development; and WHEREAS, a complete application for the Project is available and on file in the Dublin Planning Department; and WHEREAS, the Project area was previously analyzed in the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, which was adopted in 1993 and has a certified Program EIR (SCH No. 91-103064)and analyzed in the Quarry Lane Master Plan, which was adopted in 1998 by the County of Alameda and has a certified EIR(SCH No. 97122109). In 2000, the City of Dublin approved a Planned Development District Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan for the project, and adopted an Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration (Resolution 204-00, incorporated herein by reference); and WHEREAS, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15164, the City of Dublin prepared an Addendum to the EIRs and Mitigated Negative Declaration for the project that determined that the changes to the project consisting of a small increase in useable floor area, modification to retaining wall design, and a reduction in parking would not require major revisions to the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration because the changes would not have new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects. Because the building envelope, building location, extent of grading, and student and staff population were unchanged, the impacts and appropriate mitigations are the same and no new mitigations are required. Furthermore, City Staff determined that no change in circumstances would result in new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects because no new or unanticipated circumstances have developed since the EIRs were certified and the Mitigated Negative Declaration was adopted; and WHEREAS, the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and General Plan Amendment EIR identified significant unavoidable impacts from development of the Eastern Dublin area, some of which could apply to the Project. Pursuant to the Communities for a Better Environment judgment, approval of the proposed Project must be supported by a new Statement of Overriding Considerations; and WHEREAS, a CEQA Addendum and a Statement of Overriding Considerations were prepared by Staff, and WHEREAS,the Planning Commission did hold a public hearing on said application on May 25, 2004; and ATTACHMENT 2 WHEREAS, proper notice of said public hearing was given in all respects as required by law; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending the Planning Commission approve the CEQA Addendum, Statement of Overriding Considerations, Site Development Review, and Conditional Use Permit for minor amendments to building size, modification to retaining wall design, and reduction in parking requirements; and WHEREAS,the Planning Commission did hear and use its independent judgment and considered all said reports, recommendations and testimony hereinabove set forth. NOW,THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby find that: A. The Parking Reduction of 10% from the parking required by the Planned Development Zoning District substantially complies with and does not materially change the adopted Development Plans, and allows all of the Conditional Use Permit findings to be made because the project would provide 149 parking spaces, exceeding Zoning Ordinance parking regulations, and because the applicant has submitted a parking study prepared by Abrams Associates that concluded that the parking demand of students, staff and visitors would require 145 parking spaces. In addition,the Applicant has submitted a preliminary Transportation Management Program that outlines the measures and responsibilities that the school will take to reduce the traffic impacts and parking demand of the project. The Transportation Management Program measures have been incorporated into the project. B. The increase in useable floor are of 3,604 square feet and increase in allowable FAR of.009 are appropriate and minor amendments, as the increase is less than 5% of the building floor area, it consists of floor area within the approved building envelope,the number of students and staff would not increase beyond the approved 750 students and 55 staff members, and it substantially complies with and does not materially change the provisions or intent of the adopted Planned Development Zoning District Ordinance of the site. C. The modification in retaining wall design substantially complies with and does not materially change the provisions or intent of the adopted Planned Development Zoning District Ordinance of the site, because the change is necessary to allow disabled access to the playing field, the additional retaining wall will require less than 1%of additional grading of the project grading, and the grading proposed as part of the SDR project is limited to the 500-foot elevation, reducing the overall cut required, consistent with the intent of the PD District to minimize site grading. D. Approval of the Site Development Review application is consistent with the intent of Chapter 8.104, Site Development Review, of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance because it resolves project-related issues including, but not limited to, building location, architectural and landscape design and theme, vehicular and pedestrian access and on-site circulation, parking and traffic impacts, in the following manner: 1. Parking lot design coordinates vehicle circulation and parking with pedestrian and ADA accessibility. 2. Design of grading coordinates with landscaping design and project mitigation requirements such as proper design and engineering of steep slopes. 3. As conditioned,the project's street improvements provide pedestrian and vehicle access required pursuant to the site's Planned Development District regulations and the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. 4. As conditioned, water quality and stormwater control features have been designed and coordinated with the project's grading and landscaping. 5. As conditioned,the project will comply with the City of Dublin Wildfire Management Plan. E. The project is consistent with the Dublin General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan because the General Plan provisions allow approval of semi-public facilities such as schools in all land uses, and the project 2 complies with the Planned Development Zoning District established for the site pursuant to provisions and policies of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan, including the Tassajara Road Scenic Corridor Policy. F. The approval will not adversely effect the health or safety of persons residing or working in the vicinity,or be detrimental to public health, safety and general welfare because,as conditioned,the Applicant/Developer will be responsible for improvements to Tassajara Road including,but not limited to, a signalized intersection, left- turn pocket, increased street width, and maintained traffic signage requiring slower speeds while children are present. G. The project architecture, site layout and landscaping have been designed to ensure visual relief and to create a desirable and attractive environment for users of the site and the public, because of the following features: 1. As conditioned, impacts to views will be addressed as trees will be planted on the steep slope below the playing field to buffer visual impacts of re-contoured slopes to residents to the south and also to control erosion. 2. Retaining walls are screened with fast-growing, climbing vines to enhance and visually buffer their appearance. 3. Site grading and retaining walls have been minimized by the stepped, hillside design of the building and campus so that the site is physically suitable for the type and intensity of the development. 4. The building design incorporates non-glare materials and chain-link fencing will be clad in green-colored vinyl slats. H. Architectural considerations have been incorporated into the project and as conditions of approval in order to insure compatibility of the development with the design concept and setting. The building incorporates traditional architectural features and, as conditioned, the project colors, materials, methods of compliance with the Wildfire Management Plan, and final landscaping plan will be reviewed and approved as part of the building permit review process. I. The project will not overburden public services as all agencies have committed to the availability of public services prior to the annexation of the property to the City of Dublin, and will reconfirm their commitment prior to the issuance of building permits as required by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan policies and mitigation measures. J. The adopted Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan EIR and Mitigation Monitoring Program, the Quarry Lane School EIR and Mitigation Monitoring Program, and the Planned Development District PA 99-064 Mitigation Monitoring Program continue to apply to the project. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Dublin Planning Commission approves the CEQA Addendum included as Attachment 4 of the Staff Report and incorporated herein by reference. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Dublin Planning Commission adopts the Statement of Overriding Considerations for the project, included as Exhibit A of Attachment 4 of the Staff Report, and incorporated herein by reference. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Dublin Planning Commission does hereby approve a Site Development Review Permit and a Conditional Use Permit for minor amendments to Planned Development PA 99- 064 and for project plans, included as Attachment 2, stamped approved and dated May 25, 2004, subject to the Conditions of Approval, as follows_ CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL Unless stated otherwise all Conditions of Approval shall be complied with prior to the issuance of building permits or establishment of use,and shall be subject to Department of Community Development review and approval._The 3 followiniz codes represent those departments/ay-eneies responsible for monitoring compliance of the conditions of approval: [ADM] Administration/City Attorney, 1131 Building Division of the Community Development Department, IDSRI Dublin San Ramon Services District, IF] Alameda County Fire Department/City of Dublin Fire Prevention, [FIN] Finance Department, 1PL1 Planning Division of the Community Development Department, IPOI Police, 1PW1 Public works Department. CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: GENERAL-SITE DEVELOPMENT REVIEW 1. Approval. This Site Development Review approval for the PL& PW Issuance of Standard Quarry Lane Phase II, PA99-064, establishes the detailed Building Permit design concepts and regulations for the project Site Development Review for Quarry Lane Phase II, 6363 Tassajara Road. Development pursuant to this Site Development Review is conditioned upon the requirement that the development be consistent with the approved Planned Development(PD) Rezoning, including the Land Use and Development Plan, and the related General Provisions, Standards and Conditions, and Mitigation Measures and shall generally conform to the Preliminary Architectural Plans prepared by Eichleay Engineers, dated received January 23,2004;Ground Floor Plan,dated received February 4, 2004; Preliminary Site Plan and Preliminary Grading and Utility Plan prepared by Ruggeri- Jensen-Azar& Associates, dated received January 22, 2004; and Preliminary Planting Plan prepared by A.S. Dutchover& Associates, dated received September 15, 2003, unless modified by the Conditions of Approval contained herein. 2. Standard Public Works and Site Development Review PW Approval of Standard Conditions of Approval. Applicant/Developer shall Improvement comply with all applicable City of Dublin Standard Public Plans through Works(Exhibit A)and Site Development Review completion Conditions of Approval incorporated herein. In the event of a conflict between the Standard Public Works Conditions of Approval and these Conditions, these conditions shall prevail. 3. Pre-Annexation Agreement. Applicant/Developer shall PL, PW On-going PW comply with all requirements of the Annexation Agreement between Dr. Sabri Arac and the City of Dublin, dated recorded by the Alameda County Recorder on February 28, 2001. 4. Development Agreement. Per the Planned Development PL Prior to Issuance Planned District requirements,the Applicant/Developer shall enter of Grading or Development into a contractual Development Agreement with the City of Building District Dublin for all improvements, fees and requirements. The Permits Regulations Development Agreement shall be approved by all parties prior to issuance of grading or building permits. 5. Term. Pursuant to Section 8.96.020.D., approval of the PL Issuance of Standard Site Development Review shall be valid for one year from Building or Site effective date. If construction has not commenced by that Improvement time or extended per the following means, this approval Permits 4 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: shall be null and void. Commencement of construction shall mean the actual construction pursuant to the permit approval or demonstrating substantial progress toward commencing such construction. The approval period for Site Development Review may be extended six(6) additional months by the Director of Community Development upon determination that the Conditions of Approval remain adequate to assure that the above stated findings will continue to be met. Applicant/Developer must submit a written request for the extension prior to the expiration date of the Site Development review. 6. Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment/Specific PL Approval of Standard Plan. Applicant/Developer shall comply with all Improvement applicable action programs and mitigation measures of the Plans through Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment/Specific Plan completion and companion Final Environmental Impact Report(EIR), and Mitigation Measures identified in the Mitigated Negative Declarations prepared for the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment/Specific Plan that have not been made specific Conditions of Approval of this or previous projects,thereby superceding the pertinent Mitigation Measures referenced in those documents. The City shall determine which of the requirements from these prior approvals are applicable at this stage of approval. 7. Quarry Lane School Master Plan,Environmental PL On-going Quarry Lane Impact Report and Mitigated Negative Declaration. School EIR Applicart/Developer shall comply with all applicable and conditions of approval,action programs and mitigation Mitigated measures of the Quarry Lane School Master Plan and Negative companion Environmental Impact Report and Mitigated Declaration Negative Declaration. The City shall determine which of the requirements from these prior approvals are applicable at this stage of approval. 8. Revocation. The SDR will be revocable for cause in PL Ongoing Municipal accordance with Section 8.96.020.1 of the Dublin Zoning Code Ordinance. Any violation of the terms or conditions of this approval shall be subject to citation, and if non-compliance continues, potential revocation. 9. Fees. Applicant/Developer shall pay all applicable fees in Various Various times, Standard effect at the time of building permit issuance, including, but no later than but not limited to: Planning fees; Building fees; Dublin San Issuance of Ramon Services District fees; Public Facilities fees; Building Dublin Unified School District School Impact fees; Public Permits Works Traffic fees; Alameda County Fire Services fees; Noise Mitigation fees; Alameda County Flood and Water Conservation District(Zone 7)Drainage and Water Connection fees; and any other fees as noted in the Development Agreement. Unissued building permits subsequent to new or revised TIF's shall be subject to recalculation and assessment of the fair share of the new or revised fees. If the Development Agreement approved for this project conflicts with this condition,the Development 5 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Agreement shall prevail. 10. Parkland Dedication. The Applicant/Developer shall pay PL, PW Prior to Issuance Standard Public Facilities Fees in the amounts and at the times set of Building forth in the City of Dublin Resolution No. 60-99, adopted Permits by the City Council on April 6, 1999, or in the amounts and at the times set forth in any resolution revising the amount of the Public Facilities Fee, as implemented by the Administrative Guidelines adopted by Resolution 195-99. ] L. Required Permits. Applicant/Developer shall obtain all Various Various times, Standard necessary applicable permits required by other agencies but no later than including, but not limited to, Alameda County Public Issuance of Works, Alameda County Flood Control District(Zone 7); Building or Site California Department of Fish and Game; Army Corps of Development Engineers; and State Water Quality Control Board,and Permits shall submit copies of the permits to the Department of Public Works. Applicant/Developer shall also apply, pay all required fees and obtain permits from PG&E for power service connection required to energize traffic signals and streetlights. 12. Postal Service. Applicant/Devetoper shall confer with PL, PW Issuance of Standard local postal authorities to determine the type of mail units Building required and provide a letter from the Postal Service Permits stating its satisfaction with the mail units proposed. Specific locations for such mail units shall be subject to approval and satisfaction of the Postal Service and the Director of Community Development and City Engineer. A plan showing the locations of all mailboxes shall be submitted for review and approval by the City Engineer. 13. Hold Harmless/Indemnification. Applicant/Developer, PL, PW Any Action Standard and any parties or individuals granted rights-of-entry by Applicant/Developer, shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the City of Dublin and its agents, officers, and employees from any claim, action, or proceeding against the City of Dublin or its agents,officers, or employees(a) to attack, set aside, void, or annul an approval of the City of Dublin or its advisory agency, appeal board, Planning Commission, City Council, Director of Community Development,Zoning Administrator, or any other department, committee, or agency of the City concerning a subdivision or other development which actions are brought within the time period provided for in Government Code Section 66499.37 and(b)holding the City liable for any damages or wages in connection with the construction of the parks; provided, however,that the Applicant/ Developer's duty to so defend, indemnify, and hold harmless shall be subject to the City's promptly notifying the Applicant/Developer of any said claim,action, or proceeding and the City's full actions or proceedings. 14. Clarifications and Changes to the Conditions. In the PW, PL Project Standard event that there needs to be clarification to these conditions Acceptance of of approval,the Directors of Community Development and improvement Public Works have the authority to clarify the intent of 6 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: these conditions of approval to the Applicant/Developer by a written document signed by the Director of Community Development and the City Engineer and placed in the project file, also have the authority to make minor modifications to these conditions in order for the Applicant/Developer to fulfill needed improvements or mitigations resulting from impacts to this project. 15. Projected Timeline. Applicant/Developer shall submit a PO Issuance of PO projected timeline for project completion to the Dublin Building Police Services Department, to allow estimation of staffing Pen-nits requirement and assignments. 16. Health,Design and Safety Standards. Prior to final PW, PL, B Prior to Standard approval allowing occupancy of any new building, the Occupancy of physical condition of the building shall meet minimum Any Building health,design,and safety standards including, but not limited to the following: a. The streets providing access to the site shall be complete to allow for safe traffic movements to and from the site. b. All traffic striping and control signing on streets providing access to the site shall be in place. c. All repairs to the street,curb, gutter, and sidewalk which may create a hazard shall be completed to the satisfaction of the City Engineer and any non- hazardous repairs shall be complete and/or bonded for. d. All sewer clean-outs, water meter boxes, and other utility boxes shall be set to grade to the approval of the City Engineer. e. The buildings shall have received all necessary inspections and have final approval by the Building Department to allow occupancy. f. Applicant/Developer shall provide each entrance of the complex with a graphic unit locator director, visible from within a vehicle as the vehicle enters the complex. g. The Applicant/Developer shall be responsible for the repair of any damaged pavement, curb & gutter, sidewalk,or other public street facility resulting from construction activities associated with the development of the project,to the satisfaction of the City Engineer/Public Works Director. DEDICATIONS AND IldPROVEMENTS 17. Infrastructure. The location and siting of project specific PL, PW Approval of Standard wastewater, storm drain, recycled water, and potable water Improvement system infrastructure shall be consistent with the resource Plans management policies of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. 18. Tassajara Road Future Right-of-Way Line PW Approval of PW Reservation. The City of Dublin is required by Mitigation Improvement Measure 33/14.0 of the Eastern Dublin General Plan Plans Amendment/Specific Plan Mitigation Measures/Action 7 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Programs/Implementation Measures to reserve sufficient right-of-way along Tassajara Road to accommodate cumulative development of projects along this roadway corridor. To accomplish this,the City is currently developing a Precise Alignment and preparing an Initial Study for the future improvement of Tassajara Road to widen the existing two-lane County road to a six-lane divided arterial. Because the right-of-way lines associated with this future widening have not yet been established pursuant to Municipal Code Chapter 7.68,the Applicant/Developer shall refrain from constructing any improvements that rely on said right-of-way line establishment until the Precise Alignment is formally adopted. In addition, the Applicant[Developer shall adjust any proposed improvements to accommodate the adopted Precise Alignment if the adopted alignment differs from the Applicant/Developer's assumed location of the right-of- way for Tassajara Road. 19. Traffic Study. The Applicant/Developer shall construct PW Prior to Traffic and all necessary on-site and off-site traffic mitigation Occupancy Circulation improvements as stated in the Traffic and Circulation Study Study prepared for the project by Abrams Associates, prepared for dated July 12, 2000, including but not limited to: the project a. Applicant/Developer shall construct an Interim by Abrams Traffic Signal at the School entrance. Associates, b. Applicant Developer shall dedicate the necessary dated July right-of-way for future widening of Tassajara Road 12,2000 as and shall construct all necessary frontage part of the improvements. Mitigated c. Applicant'Developer shall implement mitigation Negative measures to address issue of high speeds along Declaration Tassajara Road and the Applicant/Developer shall make it clear that parking and/or loading along Tassajara Road is prohibited. No parking signs shall be posted along the street frontage. d. Applicant/Developer shall maintain the fence along Tassajara Road. c. Applicant/Developer shall provide a southbound left turn lane on Tassajra Road along with interim traffic signal at the school entrance. "I'he left turn lane shall be 150 feet in length and have a 90-foot taper. A northbound right turn lane shall be constructed at the school entrance. The right turn lane shall be a minimum of 200 feet in length plus a 90-foot taper. f. Queuing for student loading and unloading shall be contained on-site. g. Applicant/Developer shall maintain and update the Transportation Management Program. 20. School Zone Speed Limits. Pursuant to the Eastern PW, PL Prior to Study/Caltra Dublin Specific Plan Traffic and Circulation Section, Occupancy of ns pedestrians may use some parts of Tassajara Road for Building access to the school. Per Caltrans Traffic Manual and 8 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Section 22352 of the California Vehicle Code, Applicant/Developer shall retain and relocate existing signs posting 25 mph school zone speed limit when children are present. 21. Right-of-Way Dedication/Off-Site Right-of-Way PW Prior to PW Acquisition. Applicant/Developer shall dedicate the Approval of necessary right-of-way along the Tassajara Road frontage, Improvement in conformance with the to be adopted Tassajara Road Plans or Precise Alignment, and as needed to construct the Issuance of improvements shown on the Interim Tassajara Road Building or Site Widening Quarry Lane School, prepared by Ruggeri- Improvement Jensen-Azar and Associates, dated November 25,2002. In Permits addtion,the following off-site right-of-way must be acquired from adjoining properties, if not dedicated by another property owner or developer: a. Right-of-way to allow widening of Tassajara Road for a southbound left-turn pocket at the main entrance to the school must be acquired from the Wallis Ranch property(986-0004-005-01)on the west side of the road. b. Right-of-way to allow construction of a northbound right-turn lane and sidewalk at the main entrance to the site must be acquired from the Kobold property (985-0002-005-02)to the south. c. Additional right-of-way may be necessary to extend a pedestrian walkway and Class II bike lane from the school entrance south to the existing sidewalk at Shadow Hills Drive, including possible construction of a pedestrian/bicycle access bridge across the Tassajara Creek tributary that extends through the Kobold and surrounding properties. The Applicant/Developer shall undertake good-faith efforts to negotiate the acquisition of these rights-of- ways from neighboring property owners for subsequent dedication, and/or cooperate with adjoining developers currently engaged in the improvement of Tassajara Road. In the event the Applicant/Developer cannot successfully negotiate the right-of-way acquisitions, the City may use its eminent domain authority to facilitate the acquisitions. All costs associated with the right-of- way acquisition and/or condemnation shall be borne by the Applicant/Developer. 22. Location of Improvements/Configuration of Right-of- PW Approval of PW Way. All public sidewalks, handicap ramps,or other Improvement street improvements in the curb return area shall be located Plans within the public right-of-way. 23. Improvement of Tassajara Road. Applicant/Developer PW Improvement PW shall improve Tassajara Road along the property frontage, Plans to be in conformance with the Tassajara Road Ultimate Precise Completed Prior Alignment to be adopted by the City, and in general to Issuance of 9 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: conformance with the Interim Tassajara Road Widening Permits; Plan prepared by Ruggeri-Jensen-Azar and Associates, Improvements to dated November 25, 2002, and as noted in this condition. be Constructed Improvements shall include the following: Prior to a. Construction of curb and gutter, 6-foot sidewalk and Occupancy 6-foot parkway, pavement, streetlights, and landscaping. Existing pavement along the frontage shall be removed, and all new pavement along the project frontage shall be constructed to the ultimate lines and grades of the Precise Alignment. Conformance and transitions to existing improvements shall be provided as required by the City Engineer. b. Construction of a southbound left-turn lane(150' storage, 90'taper)at the main entrance to the school. c. Construction of a northbound right-turn lane (200' storage, 90'taper)at the main entrance to the school. d. Construction of a northbound bus turnout(70' storage, 180'taper) north of the main entrance to the school per LAVTA standards. e. Reconstruction of the existing curb returns at the main driveway to conform with the lines and grades of the road. f. Construction of an off-site Class Il bicycle path and pedestrian walkway, from the southerly end of the frontage south to the existing sidewalk at Shadow Hills Drive, including construction of a bridge over the existing creek south of the Kobold property. g. The Applicant/Developer shall coordinate design and construction of the street improvements with the proposed improvements by the Silveria Ranch/Pinn project and also with the replacement of the existing culvert at the Kobold property with a bridge by the Dublin Ranch/Lin project. The Applicant/ Developer shall work with adjoining developers on Tassajara Road to allow for orderly integration of these improvements with project improvements, and to reduce the amount of interim or throw-away improvements. The City Engineer may modify the scope and scheduling of these improvements if warranted to meet the above goal. 24. Prevailing Wage. All public improvements constructed by PW On-going California Developer and to be dedicated to the City are hereby Labor Code identified as "public works" under Labor Code section section 1771 1771. Accordingly, Developer, in constructing such improvements, shall comply with the Prevailing Wage Law (Labor Code, sects. 1720 and following). 25. Existing Covenant. The Preliminary Report prepared by PW Issuance of Standard Old Republic Title Company dated September 23, 1999 Building or Site indicates that an Agreement for Covenant for Use Improvement Restrictions was executed between the Permits 10 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Applicant/Developer and Robert and Michelle Nielsen on May 14, 1999. The Applicant/Developer shall disclose whether the use restriction or other covenant terms disallow or otherwise influence the design of the proposed improvements, and shall modify the improvements as necessary to adhere to the use restriction and covenant terms. 26. Maintenance of Improvements within Public Right-of- PW Occupancy of PW Way. Applicant/Developer shall maintain the landscaping Buildings and parkway strip on public streets fronting or within the project during construction to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. Following acceptance of improvements. All frontage landscaping within the public right-of-way shall be maintained by the property owner. 27. Encroachment Permit. An encroachment permit shall be PW Issuance of Standard secured from the City Engineer for any work to be done Grading Permits within the public right-of-way where work is not covered under the improvement plans. 28. Relocation of Existing Improvements. Any relocation of PW Completion of Standard existing improvements or public utilities shall be Improvements accomplished under the direction of the governing agency, with applicable permits at no expense to the City. 29. Accessibility Requirements/Handicap Ramps. Site PW Occupancy of Standard accessibility, including all handicap ramps, shall comply Building with all current UBC Title 24 requirements and City of Dublin Standards. All disabled parking stalls shall be 9- foot by 18-foot minimum. Plans shall provide curb ramps from all disabled parking spaces to adjacent sidewalk areas. Curb ramps shall meet ADA requirements. Improvement plans shall show all disabled access paths conforming to ADA requirements. All paths with a slope of 5%or greater are considered ramps and shall comply with ADA requirements. Plans shall show disabled access to tennis courts. Access from all buildings, public right-of- way, and parking lots and among buildings must meet ADA requirements. 30. Improvement and Grading Plans. All improvement and PW Prior to issuance Standard grading plans submitted to the Public Works Department of Grading/ for review/approval shall be prepared in accordance with Sitework Permit the approved Tentative Map,these Conditions of Approval, and the City of Dublin Municipal Code including Chapter 7.16 (Grading Ordinance). When submitting plans for review/approval,the Applicant/Developer shall also fill-out and submit a City of Dublin Improvement Plan Review Checklist(three 8-1/2"x 1 l"pages). Said checklist includes necessary design criteria and other pertinent information to assure that plans are submitted in accordance with established City standards. The plans shall also reference the current City of Dublin Standard Plans(booklet), and shal I include applicable City of Dublin Improvement Plan General Notes (three 8-1/2"x 11" pages). For on-site improvements,the 11 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Applicant/Developer shall adhere to the City's On-site Checklist(eight 8-1/2"x 11" pages). All of these reference documents are available from the Public Works Department(call telephone 925-833-6630 for more information). 31. Grad ing/Sitewo rk Permit. All site improvement work PW Prior to issuance Standard and public right-of-way work must be performed per a of Grading/Sitework Permit issued by the Public Works Grading/Sitewor Department. Said permit will be based on the final set of k Permit improvement plans to be approved once all of the plan check comments have been resolved. Please refer to the handout titled Grading/Site Improvement Permit Application Instructions and attached application (three 8- 1/2"x 11"pages)for more information. The Applicant/Developer must fill in and return the applicant information contained on pages 2 and 3. The current cost of the permit is $10.00 due at the time of permit issuance, although the Applicant/Developer will be responsible for any adopted increases to the fee amount. 32. Temporary Construction Fencing. Temporary PW Prior to issuance Standard Construction fencing shall be installed along the perimeter of final of all work under construction to separate the construction Occupancy operation from the public. All construction activities shall Permit or be confined to within the fenced area. Construction acceptance of materials and/or equipment shall not be operated or stored public outside of the fenced area or within the public right-of-way improvements unless approved in advance by the City Engineer/Public by the City Works Director. Council 33. Construction Hours. Standard construction and grading PL, B, PL Prior to Standard hours shall be limited to weekdays(Monday through acceptance of Friday)and non-City holidays between the hours of 7:30 improvements a.m. and 6:00 p.m. The Applicant/Developer may request by City Council reasonable modifications to such determined days and hours, taking into account the seasons, impacts on neighboring properties, and other appropriate factors, by submitting a request form to the City Engineer/Public Works Director. For work on Saturdays, said request shall be submitted no later than 5:00 p.m. the prior Wednesday. Overtime inspection rates will apply for all after-hours, Saturday, and/or holiday work. 34. Geographic Information System. Once the City PW Prior to Standard Engineer/Public Works Director approves the development acceptance of project, a digital vectorized file on floppy or CD of the improvements Improvement Plans shall be submitted to the City and by City Council DSRSD. Digital master copies are not acceptable. The digital vectorized files shall be in AutoCAD 14 or higher drawing format or ESRI Shapefile format. Drawing units shall be decimal with the precision of 0.00. All objects and entities in layers shall be colored by layer and named in English, although abbreviations are acceptable. All submitted drawings shall use the Global Coordinate System of USA,California,NAD 83 California State 12 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Plane,Zone III, and U.S. foot. Said submittal shall be acceptable to the City's GIS Coordinator. WATER UALITY 35. Water Quality Measures. Project specific water quality PL, PW Approval of Eastern measures shall be submitted with development Improvement Dublin improvement plans incorporating water quality measures Plans or Specific Plan outlined in the book, "Start at the Source". These water Issuance of and Planned quality measures should address improving the quality of Building or Site Development storm runoff and the removal of discharged pollutants from Development District surface runoff into drainage facilities to the satisfaction of Permits Regulations the City Engineer. Requirements for Water Quality are as follows: a. Peak Flow Attenuation. The Applicant/Developer shall submit a detailed design for the storm water detention basin proposed for the playing field and other measures to attenuate peak storm water flows. Detention features shall be designed to control storm water run-off to pre-development conditions. Applicant shall submit a Hydrology Map and Hydraulic Calculations associated with this design. b. Improvement and grading designs shall be coordinated with the landscape design to provide bioswales that will function and meet Best Management Practices. Bioswales shall be constructed to collect storm water run-off and filter pollutants from the site, before discharging to the stone drains stem in Tassa'ara Road. 36. Water Quality Requirements. All development shall PL, PW Approval EDSP EIR meet the water quality requirements of the Alameda Improvement County's NPDES Permit No. CAS0029831 and the Plans or Alameda Countywide Clean Water Program. The issuance of Applicant/Developer shall submit a copy of a Notice of Building or Site Intent obtained from the State Water Resources Control Development Board,together with a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan. In addition, all storm water inlets within the street areas of the project shall be stenciled "No Dumping- Drains to Bay" using a stencil approved by the City. Notice of Termination must also be submitted according 1 . 37. Storm Water Treatment Measures Maintenance PW Prior to Standard Agreement. Applicant/Developer shall enter into an acceptance of agreement with the City of Dublin that guarantees the improvements property owner's perpetual maintenance obligation for all by City Council storm water treatment measures installed as part of the project. Said agreement is required pursuant to Provision C.3.e.ii of RWQCB Order R2-2003-0021 for the reissuance of the Alameda Countywide NPDES municipal storm water permit. Said permit requires the City to provide verification and assurance that all treatment devices will be property operated and maintained. STORM DRAIN IMPROVEMENTS 38. Storm Drain Improvements. The Applicant/Developer PW Prior to Street Planned shall construct an underground storm drains stem in Improvements Development 13 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Tassajara Road designed to safely convey the existing run- Construction District off as well as proposed flows collected by the system. The Regulations project Developer's civil engineer shall submit written documentation to the Dublin Public Works Department that anticipated storm water run-off from the site will be consistent with master storm drain plans. If, in fact, anticipated storm water flows exceed any master plan assumptions,the project Developer shall make arrangements satisfactory to the Dublin Director of Public Works that storm water flows can be safely accommodated. Written documentation shall state that storm water run-off from the site shall not adversely impact the property to the south. Storm Drain Improvements are required as follows: a. This system shall be designed to also safely convey existing and developed flows upstream of the project that will be collected by this system. Drainage improvements shall include construction of a storm drain in Tassajara Road, extending from the north end of the frontage south to the existing culvert south of the Kobold frontage. b. The system design shall include a new outfall at structure at Tassajara Creek. Design of this system shall be coordinated with the proposed vehicle bridge along Tassajara Road at Tassajarar Creek, and also coordinated with the ultimate design of Tassajara Road. c. Applicant/Developer shall submit a Hydrology Map and Hydraulic Calculations associated with this design. Mitigation Measure#7 from the Mitigated Negative Declaration for the project requires the Applicant's civil engineer to furnish a letter to the Public Works Director that indicates storm water flows from the project can be safely accommodated in local/regional drainage facilities. d. The Applicant shall construct storm drain inlets along Tassajara Road near the curb returns to the main driveway to the school. These inlets shall be designed to collect run-off from Tassajara Road before entering the school site, and shall be connected to the storm drain system in Tassajara Road. e. The existing topography shows several storm drain structures in the middle of the main drive aisle. These structures appear to be paved over. The Applicant/Developer shall uncover these existing structures and raise them to grade as needed. TRAFFIC AND CIRCULATION 39. Traffic Signals. The Applicant/Developer is responsible PW Improvements PW for the installation of a traffic signal on Tassajara Road at shall be the main entrance into the site. The traffic signal shall be constructed designed to conform with the future street into the Wallis prior to 14 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: property, and to minimize interim or throw-away occupancy improvements. 40. Traffic Impact Fees. Applicant/Developer shall pay PW Issuance of PW required TIF fees at issuance of Building Permit. Building Permit Applicant/Developer is eligible to receive TIF credits/reimbursement for the installation of improvements and payments per the City adopted TIF Guidelines Resolution#23-99. 41. No Parking. Applicant/Developer shall designate no PW Occupancy of PW parking areas along the driveways,except for the areas Any Building specifically shown as drop-off zones on the site plan. Parking shall only be on the designated areas as per approved parking plans and as approved by the City Engineer and Community Development Director. 42. LAVTA. Applicant/Developer shall cooperate with PW Approval of PW LAVTA to provide convenient access to public transit,to Final Map and enhance local and regional mobility and integration of Improvement LAVTA with other public transit systems, and to locate Plans bus alignments,turnouts, service stops,bus shelters and other transit amenities to the satisfaction of the City Engineer,and in accordance with the LAVTA letter dated November 6, 2002. The cost of procuring and installing the necessary improvements to meet the requirements listed above shall be paid by Applicant/Developer. Applicant/Developer shall comply with all applicable requirements of LAVTA. 43. Oversize Construction Loads. Permits shall be required PW Issuance of Standard for oversized and/or overweight construction loads coming Building or Site to and leaving from the site on City Streets. If soil is to be Improvement imported or exported from the site, a haul route plan shall Permit be submitted to the City for review and approval. 44. Construction Traffic. Applicant/Developer shall prepare PW Issuance of Standard a traffic safety plan for construction traffic interface with Building or Site public traffic on existing public streets Tassajara Road. Improvement All construction traffic may be subject to specific routing, Permits as determined by the City Engineer, in order to minimize construction interference with regional non-project traffic movement. 45. Traffic Safety. Regulatory signs and/or"red-curbing" PW, PO Approval of Standard shall be provided in accordance with the standards of the Improvement City of Dublin subject to plan approval by the City Plans Engineer. PARKING AND ON-SITE CIRCULATION 46. Parking. Applicant/Developer shall provide parking as PL Completion of Standard shown on the Site Plan. Parking space#1 shown on the Improvements plan shall be prohibited, as it is within a drive aisle. All parking spaces shall be double-striped with 4-inch wide stripes set approximately 2 feet apart as shown on the "Typical Parking Striping Detail". Handicapped and visitor parking spaces shall be appropriately identified on the pavement. In addition, the three parking spaces grouped on the southeast portion of the parking lot shall be 15 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: identified as staff parking due to the difficulty of maneuvering out of these spaces. Compact sized spaces shall be properly identified with the word "COMPACT" stenciled on the pavement surface within each space. 47. Recreational Vehicle Parking. Recreation vehicle PL On-going Municipal parking shall not be permitted on site. Code 48. Garage Floor Drains. The Applicant/Developer shall PW, Prior to issuance PW construct garage floor drains in the underground parking DSRSD of Building garage. These drains shall be designed to collect residual Permit waters collected in the garage (i.e. run-off from vehicles, wash down of garage floor pavement, waters dispersed from a trip of the fire sprinkler system,etc.). These drains shall be connected to the sanitary sewer system pursuant to DSRSD requirements. 49. Transportation Management Plan. Applicant/Developer PL On-going Traffic and shall submit a Transportation Management Plan for review Circulation and approval by the Public Works Department and Study, Community Development Department. The Transportation Abrams Management Plan shall be generally consistent with the Associates, Transportation Management Plan prepared by Dr. Sabri July 12, Arac dated received on May 19, 2004, including but not 2000 limited to staggered hours of operation and scheduling of special events. UTILITIES 50. Water and Sewer Lines. The Applicant/Developer shall PW, Occupancy of PW extend a water and sewer line in Tassajara Road from the DSRSD first building existing lines at Shadow Hills Drive to the north end of the frontage. The sewer line shall be designed to be located under the existing culvert at the creek crossing per DSRSD letter of recommendation dated April 24, 2003, to avoid reconstruction of the line when the culvert is removed and replaced with a bridge. Consideration shall be given to locating the water main so that water service can be maintained during future culvert removal and bridge construction. DSRSD shall review plans for compliance. The water and sewer lines shall be sized to handle ultimate flows as determined by DSRSD. 51. Utility Boxes. ApplicanUDeveloper shall place all above PW Occupancy of PW grade utility boxes in landscaped areas embellished and first building hidden from public view and shall coordinate the location with the utility companies to meet their respective requirements. If there is a conflict between the site design and utility requirements it shall be the responsibility of the Applicant/Developer to inform the City of Dublin and develop an agreeable solution acceptable to all parties involved. 52. Joint Utility Trenches/Undergrounding/Utility Plans. PW Occupancy of PW Applicant/Developer shall construct all joint utility first building trenches(such as electric,telephone, cable TV, and gas) along Tassajara Road in accordance with the appropriate utilitv jurisdiction and the City of Dublin guidelines. In 16 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: addition, the existing overhead utility line along the Tassajara Road frontage shall be placed underground. All communication vaults, electric transformers, cable TV boxes,blow-off valves and any appurtenant utility items thereto shall be underground and located behind the proposed sidewalk within the public service easement, unless otherwise approved by the City Engineer and any applicable agency. All conduit shall be under the sidewalk within the public right of way to allow for street tree planting. Utility plans, showing the location of all proposed utilities(including electrical vaults and underground transformers)behind the sidewalk, shall be reviewed and approved by the City Engineer. Location of these items shall be shown on the Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan. 53. Street Light Maintenance Assessment District and PW Issuance of PW Waive Right to Protest. The Applicant/Developer waives Building or Site any right to protest the inclusion of the property or any Improvement portion of it in a Landscape and Lighting Assessment Permits District or similar assessment district, and further waives any right to protest the annual assessment for that District. Applicant/Developer shall not contest the City's efforts to annex the project into the Citywide Street Light Maintenance Assessment District 1983-1 (for standard corbra-head type fixtures), and shall provide all necessary documentation required by the City to complete the annexation process. The Applicant/Developer shall comply with any City requirements necessary to conform with Proposition 2I8. 54. Streetlights. Streetlights and all site lights on public PW Approval of Standard sidewalks and streets and private driveways shall be City Improvement approved. Decorative lights shall be designed so as to not Plans shine into adjacent windows, shall be readily available for purchase over a long period of time(e.g., 30 or more years),and shall be designed so that the efficiency of the lights do not require close spacing to meet illumination requirements. A street lighting plan which demonstrates compliance with this condition shall be submitted prior to improvement plan approval and shall be subject to review and approval by the City Engineer. The type of site lighting used shall be acceptable to the Community Development Director. Streetlights shall be standard cobra head fixtures for all streets. 55. Installation of Utilities. Applicant/Developer shall PW Approval of PW submit for review the location of all utility boxes and Improvement utility structures prior to construction. All utility boxes Plans and utility structures shall be shown on landscape plans and approved by the City Engineer and Community Development Director. 56. Traffic Signal Interconnect and Future School District PW Occupancy of Standard Conduits. Applicant/Developer shall install two First Building additional conduits in the joint utility trench extending 17 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: along both Tassajara Road as follows: a. A 3-inch diameter traffic signal interconnect conduit shall be installed with No. 6 pull boxes and "Interconnect" labeled lids spaced not more than 200-feet apart. Conduit bends shall have a minimum radius of 3-feet. Terminations shall occur at traffic signal controllers, or at locations that will allow for future extension of the conduit. b. A 3-inch diameter conduit shall be installed according to the criteria listed above, except that the pull box lids shall have no label, and the terminations shall occur at project limits subject to the review and approval of the City Engineer. GRADING 57. Grading. Final Grading Plan shall show off-site PW, PL Approval of PW conditions and extend topography outside property line Grading Plan boundaries. Final Grading Plan shall be consistent with trees shown below playing field on Planting Plan prepared by A.S. Dutchover& Associates, submitted September 15, 2003. Final Grading Plan shall include engineering details prepared by the Geotechnical Engineer demonstrating means of construction of tree wells within 1 '/2 to 1 slope below playing field and shall provide adequate means of erosion control and means of regular maintenance. Plans shall be peer-reviewed by the City Engineer and City Landscape Architect at the Applicant's expense. Engineering of tree wells may require retaining walls. Regular maintenance details may require safe means of personnel access to landscaping. Final Grading Plan shall hold driveway slopes to 10% in areas adjacent to parking. 58. Pad and Finished Floor Elevations. Pad and finished PW, PL, B Approval of PW, B floor elevations and grading shall generally match the Grading Plan proposed Grading Plan shown on the SDR and approved improvement plans. Any revisions shall be specifically reviewed and approved by the City Engineer. The Applicant/Developer shall install area drains between buildings and all drainage shall flow away from the buildings as per UBC and to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. 59. Graded Slopes/Erosion Control During Construction. PW Prior to issuance Standard Applicant/Developer shall include an Erosion and of Sediment Control Plan with the Grading and Improvement Grading/Sitewor plans for review and approval by the City Engineer/Public k Permit and Works Director. Said plan shall be designed, During implemented, and continually maintained pursuant to the Construction City's NPDES permit between October 151 and April 151h or beyond these dates if dictated by rainy weather, or as otherwise directed by the City Engineer/Public Works Director. All landscaped and graded slopes shall be hydroseeded, covered with a blown hay application and treated with a tackifier or other erosion control measures deemed necessary by the City Engineer immediately upon 18 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: completion of grading to prevent soil erosion. The hydroseed mix shall be subject to approval by the City Engineer. Additional erosion control measures shall be designed for the slope below the playing field. 60. Retaining Walls. The design of all retaining walls shall PW Approval of Standard be reviewed by the Geotechinical Engineer and their Improvement recommendations implemented. Geotechnical Enginners plans through recommendation may require updating for actual final completion height and dimensions of all retaining walls on plans. Retaining walls shall be constructed in general conformance with the Preliminary Grading and Utility Plan, prepared by Ruggeri-Jensen-Azar and Associates, Inc., unless approved otherwise by the Director of Public Works. Details shall be provided for all proposed retaining walls. GEQTECHNICAL 61. Geotechnical Report and Recommendations. The PW Issuance of Standard Supplemental Geotechnical Investigation—Proposed Grading Permit Quarry Lane School Phase 11, prepared by Nicholas Engineering Consultants and dated June 12, 2000, made project-specific recommendations which shall be incorporated into the grading plan for the project, as follows: a. The existing subdrainage system within the slope area of the proposed Phase II building must be rebuilt after the previously-placed fill is removed. The grading/utility plans shall reflect this required work. b. The cut slope above the playing fields may need to be rebuilt to address concerns about the existing collvium deposits. If this work is necessary,then keyways and subdrains shall be required. The grading plans shall address these issues. c. The grading plans shall show all areas of required overexcavation and slope rebuilding to assure that subsubsurface drainage systems installed with Phase I are properly relocated. No subdrainage system shall extend beneath proposed buildings or structures without prior approval. Proposed keyways shall be shown on the grading plans. d. The geogrid design for the proposed slopes and retaining walls must be included in the grading plans and submitted to the geotechnical engineer and City for review. e. All proposed graded slopes shall conform to the Geotechnical Report prepared for this project and current UBC requirements. This may include constructing intermediate benches and drainage ditches and/or reducing sloe grades. IMPROVEMENT AGREEMENT AND SECURITY 62. Improvement Agreement and Security. Pursuant to I Y ADM Prior to Standard §7.16.620 of the Munici al Code and Subdivision Map Act approval of 19 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: §66499, the Applicant/Developer shall enter into Improvement Improvement Agreement with the City to guarantee the Plans or required improvements. The Agreement will require Issuance of Site Improvement Security to be posted to guarantee the Development or faithful performance of the permitted work and the Building payment for labor and materials. Such Security shall be in Permits the form of cash,a certified or cashier's check, a letter of credit, or surety bonds executed by the Applicant/Developer and by a corporate surety authorized to do business in California. The amount of the Security guaranteeing faithful performance shall be 100%of the estimated cost of the work. The amount of the Security guaranteeing the payment for labor and materials shall be 100%of the estimated cost of the work. The Applicant/Developer shall provide an estimate of these costs with the first submittal of the improvement plans for checking. 63. Release of Security. When all improvements governed by PW, ADM Acceptance of Standard the Improvement Agreement are complete to the Improvements satisfaction of the City Engineer,the City Council will consider accepting the improvements and releasing the Security. Prior to the Council's acceptance, the Applicant/Developer shall furnish the following to the City: a. A Maintenance Bond or other replacement security in an amount equal to 25%of the estimated cost of the work to guarantee against defects for a one- year period. b. As-Built or Record Drawings printed on mylar of all Improvement Plans and maps associated with the project. c. Digital computer tiles of the plans in a format compatible with the City's GIS system. d. A Declaration or Report by the project Geotechnical Engineer confirming that all geotechnical and grading work associated with the project has been performed in accordance with the Engineer's recommendations. e. Payment of any outstanding City fees or other debts. f. Any other information deemed necessary by the City Engineer. EMERGENCY SERVICES/FIRE 64. Fire Codes and Ordinances. All project construction F Building Permit Standard shall conform to all fire codes and ordinances in effect at the time of building permit. 65. Emergency Vehicle Access. In accordance with the PW, F Approval of PW ACFD requirements, Applicant/Developer shall provide Improvement emergency vehicle access routes into the project, in general Plans conformance with the site plan. Applicant/Developer shall demonstrate how emergency access requirements shall be 20 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: achieved on the Improvement Plans to the satisfaction of the Ci Engineer and the ACFD. 66. ACFD Rules,Regulations and Standards. F Prior to F Applicant/Developer shall comply with all Alameda Issuance of County Fire Services(ACFD)rules, regulations, City of Building Dublin and standards, including minimum standards for Permits emergency access roads and payment of applicable fees, including City of Dublin Fire facilities Fees. 67. Fire Hydrants. The Applicant/Developer shall construct F Occupancy of PW all new fire hydrants in streets to City and Alameda County adjacent Fire Department standards. The Applicant/Developer shall building comply with applicable Alameda County fire Department, Public Works Department, Dublin Police Service, Alameda County Flood Control District Zone 7 and Dublin San Ramon Services District requirements. 68. Fire Conditions. Applicant/Developer shall comply with F Issuance of F all conditions of the Alameda County Fire Department Building (ACFD), including: Permits a. Final location of fire hydrants shall be approved by the Alameda County Fire Department in accordance with current standards. Minimum fire flow design shall be for 1,500 gpm with 105-psi residual flowing from a single hydrant. Raised blue reflectorized traffic markers shall be epoxied to the center of the paved street opposite each hydrant. A drawing of the approved locations shall be submitted for future reference. b. Fire apparatus roadways shall have a minimum unobstructed width of 20 feet and an unobstructed vertical clearance of not less than 13 feet 6 inches. The single,one-way driveway at the north side of the site shall be a minimum 14 feet wide with no parking. One-way driveway shall be posted with signage indicating"Exit Only"facing Tassajara Road. Roadways under 36 feet wide shall be posted with signs or shall have red curbs painted with labels on one side; roadways under 28 feet wide shall be posted with signs or shall have red curbs painted with labels on both sides of the street as follows: "NO STOPPING FIRE LANE-CVC 22500.1". (CFC 1998, Section 1998). c. Emergency Vehicle Access roadways shall be designed and installed to support the imposed loads of fire equipment. The minimum standard shall be H2O design. Design shall be approved by ACFD prior to installation. The maximum grade for fire apparatus roadway is 12%and 2% in the hammerhead. d. Gates or barricades designed for emergency vehicle access shall meet the standards of the ACFD and the City of Dublin. e. Prior to the delivery of any combustible material 21 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: storage on the site or vertical construction, public water supply, including all fire hydrants, and emergency vehicle access roads(first lift of asphalt)shall be installed and sufficient water storage and pressure shall be available to the site. f. Plans may be subject to revision following review. g. The building shall meet the area requirements from the California Building Code. h. The building and site shall comply with the City of Dublin Wildfire Management Plan. Heavy timber construction shall be used for architectural details such as eaves and canopies to comply with the Wildfire Management Plan,where necessary. i. The exits into and out of the exit passageways from the gymnasium shall have adequate exit width. j. The north elevator lobby cannot open into stairway enclosure as this is considered a normally occupied area. k. The horizontal exits shall comply with the provisions in the California Building Code. 1. All construction equipment/machinery/devices with internal combustion engines shall be equipped with approved spark arrestors while operating in this project area. m. Approved numbers or addresses shall be placed on all new and existing buildings. The address shall be positioned as to be plainly visible and legible from the street or road fronting the property. Said numbers shall contrast with their background (CFC, 1998, Section 901.4.4) n. Provide 2A1 OBC fire extinguishers within 75-foot travel distance of portions of the space. An approved sign in accordance with the Uniform Building Code shall be conspicuously posted above the extinguishers. (CFC 1002) o. Provide Knox key boxes at the main entrance to the building and at the gate to the garage and gate across the fire access road. The gates shall be a minimum of 14 feet wide and comply with City of Dublin requirements. The lock box shall contain a key that provides access to the building. Order forms for the lock box are available at the Fire Prevention Office at 100 Civic Center Plaza. The key can be placed in the box during the Fire Department inspection prior to closure of building permit. p. The project shall comply with Uniform Building and Fire Codes as adopted by the City of Dublin. EMERGENCY SERVICES/POLICE SERVICES 69. City of Dublin Municipal Code and City of Dublin Non PL, PO, B, Plans Approved Standard Residential Security Ordinance. The I PW prior to Issuance 22 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Applicant/Developer shall comply with all City of Dublin of Building Municipal Code requirements and shall meet the current Permits/ City of Dublin Non Residential Security Ordinance Lighting requirements. The Applicant/Developer shall incorporate Installed prior to the following required information in project plans: Occupancy of a. Applicant/Developer shall submit a final lighting Any Building plan (including photometrics)to the Department of Community Development and the Dublin Police Services for review and approval. At a minimum, the plan shall include 0.50 candle lighting levels at all doors, 1.0 candle lights at ground level in parking lot areas, and lighting fixtures that are a vandal-resistant type. Lighting shall be consistent with Mitigation Measure#3 of the Initial Study,as follows: pole-mounted lights shall be equipped with cut-off lenses and oriented down toward interior streets to minimize unwanted light and glare spill over; building security lighting and other lights shall be directed downward; exterior lighting shall be dimmed or turned off during off- hours;all exterior glass panels shall be of non- glare manufacture; and the project developer shall also work with the City of Dublin Police Services Department to investigate the concept of the"dark campus"concept, if such concept is consistent with adopted City security ordinances. b. Vandal resistant covers shall protect all exterior lighting devices. c, Addressing and building numbers shall be visible from the approaches to the building. d. Pathways to the upper play fields shall be easily identifiable and landscaping along the pathways shall be kept low and away from the path. e. Parking areas or structures controlled by unmanned mechanical parking type gates shall provide for police emergency access as follows: i. An approved Knoxbox or Knox type key switch is to be mounted on a control pedestal consisting of a metal post/pipe shall be installed at a height of 42 inches and a minimum of 15 feet (4.6m) from the entry/exit gate. It shall be located on the driver's side of the road or driveway and accessible in such a manner as to not require a person to exit their vehicle to reach it, nor to require any back-up movements in order to enter/exit the gate. ii. Multi-tenant buildings utilizing electronic PO PO access control systems on the main entry doors Plan submitted shall provide police emergency access utilizing prior to an approved key switch device or approved Occupancy of Knoxbox which shall be installed as follows: Any Building iii. All doors using an electromagnetic type of 23 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: lock shall install a key switch device within the building's exterior telephone/intercom console or in a control housing consisting of a heavy gauge metal,vandal and weather resistant square or rectangular housing which shall be installed on the top of the control pedestal. An approved Knoxbox or Knox type key switch is to be mounted on the side facing the roadway located within close proximity and in a visible area near the door. iv. There shall be positioned at each street entrance an illuminated diagrammatic representation(map)of the complex that shows the location of the viewer and the unit designations within the complex. V. The developer is to insure radio frequency transmit and receive capabilities for Police/Fire/Ambulance. f. Stairways shall be designed as follows: i. Interior doors shall have glazing panels a minimum of 5 inches wide and 20 inches in height and meet requirements of the Uniform Building Code. ii. Areas beneath stairways at or below ground level shall be fully enclosed or access to them restricted. iii. Enclosed stairways shall have shatter resistant mirrors or other equally reflective material at each level and landing and be designed or placed in such manner as to provide visibility around corners. g. Landscaping shall be kept at a minimal height and fullness giving patrol officers and the general public surveillance capabilities of the area. h. Seat walls, rails, planter boxes, etc., shall be designed to minimize their attraction to skateboarders. i. The Applicant/Developer shall install perimeter construction fencing,the site shall be fenced during construction, and the City of Dublin Community Development Director shall employ security lighting and patrols as necessary. Perimeter fencing shall be a minimum of six feet and shall be maintained in good condition. j. The developer and/or property owner shall keep the site clear of graffiti vandalism on a regular and continuous basis at all times. Graffiti resistant paints for the structures and film for windows or glass shall be used. k. Applicant/Developer shall work with the Dublin Police on an ongoing basis to establish an effective theft prevention and security program. Applicant/ Developer shall submit a security plan for the site for 24 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: review and approval by the Dublin Police. BUILDING AND SAFETY 70. Building Codes and Ordinances. All project construction B Through Standard shall conform to all building codes and ordinances in effect Completion at the time of building permit. 71. Building Permits. To apply for building permits, B Issuance of Standard Applicant/Developer shall submit eight(8)sets of Building construction plans to the Building Division for plan check. Permits Each set of plans shall have attached an annotated copy of these Conditions of Approval. The notations shall clearly indicate how all Conditions of Approval will or have been complied with. Construction plans will not be accepted without the annotated resolutions attached to each set of plans. Applicant/Developer will be responsible for obtaining the approvals of all participation non-City agencies prior to the issuance of building permits. Issuance of Building Permits 72. Construction Drawings. Construction plans shall be fully B Issuance of Standard dimensioned(including building elevations)accurately Building drawn (depicting all existing and proposed conditions on Permits site), and prepared and signed by a California licensed Architect or Engineer. All structural calculations shall be prepared and signed by a California licensed Architect or Engineer. The site plan, landscape plan and details shall be consistent with each other. 73. Engineer Observation. The Engineer of record shall be B Prior to final Standard retained to provide observation services for all components frame inspection of the lateral and vertical design of the building, including nailing,holdowns, straps, shear, roof diaphragm and structural frame of building. A written report shall be submitted to the City Inspector prior to scheduling the final frame inspection. 74. Exiting. The gymnasium/cafeteria has a maximum B Prior to issuance Standard occupant load of 1,146 requiring 4 exits. The current side of building exit doors must provide for exiting of one third of the total permit occupant load served. UBC 1007.2.2 75. Occupancy Calculations. Applicant/Developers shall B Prior to issuance Standard provide occupancy calculations for the entire building of building including the lobby of the gymnasium/cafeteria. permit 76. Exiting from third floor. Applicant/Developers shall B Prior to issuance Standard provide a 1-hour corridor to comply with exiting from the of building 3`d level. ermit 77. Allowable Floor Area Calculations.The calculation for B Prior to issuance UBC the allowable size of the building does not compute, If the of building lower level of the structure is a basement(not a story)the permit sprinkler increase will allow the structure to be type V-N. If the lower level does not qualify as "not a story",then the type of construction would need to be type III-N or greater. "Story"is that portion of a building included between the upper surface of any floor and the upper surface of floor above. If the finished floor level directly above a usable or 25 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: unused under-floor space is more that 6 feet above grade, for more that 50 percent of the total perimeter or is more that 12 feet above grade at any point, such usable or unusable under-floor space shall be considered as a story. Grade(Adjacent Ground Level) is the lowest point of elevation of the finished surface of the ground, paving, or sidewalk within the area between the building and the property line or, when the property line is more than 5 feet from the building, between the building and a line 5 feet from the building. UBC 208 78. Energy Conservation. Building plans shall demonstrate Issuance of PL, PW the incorporation of energy conservation measures into the Building design, construction, and operation of proposed Permits development. 79. Green Building Guidelines. To the extent practical, the B Issuance of Building applicant shall incorporate Green Building Measures. Building Green Building Plan shall be submitted to the Building Permits Official for review. REFUSE COLLECTION AND RECYCLING 80. Refuse Collection. The refuse collection service provider PL, PW Occupancy of Standard shall be consulted to ensure that adequate space is Any Building provided to accommodate collection and sorting of petrucible solid waste as well as source-separated recyclable materials generated by this project. 81. Refuse Collection Location. The Applicant/Developer PL, PW Approval of Standard shall provide designated refuse collection areas for the Improvement project,to the satisfaction of the City Engineer and the Plans or Community Development Director. Collection areas shall Occupancy of be shown on the improvement and landscape plans for this Any Building phase. Appiicant/Developer shall provide "No Parking" signs in designated refuse collection areas. The refuse collection plan shall be approved by the appropriate solid waste collection company prior to approval of im rovement plans. 82. Recycling. Applicant/Developer shall provide refuse- PW Occupancy of Standard recycling collection and conform to the City of Dublin's Any Building rccycling program. PLANNING 83. Walls and Fences. All walls and fences shall conform to PL Occupancy of Standard Section 8.72.080 of the Zoning Ordinance unless otherwise Building required by this resolution. Construction/installation of common/shared fences for all side and rear yards shall be the responsibility of Applicant/Developer. 84. Wall or Fence Heights. All wall or fence heights shall be PW Approval of Standard a minimum 6 feet high(except in those locations where Improvement Section 8.72.080 of the Zoning Ordinance requires lower Plans fence heights). All walls and fences shall be designed to ensure clear vision at all street intersections to the satisfaction of the City Engineer. 85. Mitigation Measures. The project shall comply with all PL Occupancy of Initial Study Mitigation Measures, incorporated into the project per the Building 26 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Initial Study completed July 17, 2000, including but not limited to: a. The project developer shall adhere to applicable Tassajara Creek Valley Scenic Corridor Policies and Standards for development phases proposed in the City of Dublin. In addition, mitigation measures included in the Alameda County Environmental Impact Report to reduce visual impacts, including but not limited to limiting site grading, replanting graded slopes and similar elements, shall be complied with. b. On-site retaining walls shall be landscaped with fast-growing evergreen vines. c. The chain-link fencing around the sports fields and on top of the retaining walls shall be of green vinyl cladding to reduce visibility and reflectiveness. d. Landscaping along the project frontage shall comply with the City of Dublin Streetscape Master Plans. e. The steep slope on the southeast corner of the site (approximately 1.5 to 1)shall be reduced through the following methods: i. The landscape plan for the project shall designate vegetation suitable for slope areas to ensure slope stability. ii. The base of this slope shall be landscaped with dense, fast-growing appropriately spaced vertical trees. Tree wells shall be provided to protect trees and encourage healthy growth. 86. Project colors and materials. Project colors and PL Prior to PL materials shall be generally consistent with samples Occupancy or submitted June 24,2002. Final colors shall be subject to Temporary review and approval by the Community Development Occupancy of Director. Building 87. Air Conditioning Units. Air conditioning units and B, PL Occupancy of ventilation ducts shall be screened from public view with Building materials compatible to the main building and shall not be roof mounted unless shown on plans approved as part of the Site Development Review. Units shall be permanently installed on concrete pads or other non-movable materials to be approved by the Building Official and Director of Community Development. 88. Glare/Reflective Finishes. The use of reflective finishes PL Issuance of Initial Study on building exteriors is prohibited. In order to control the Building effects of glare within this project, reflective glass shall not Permits be used. 89. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan. The PL Prior to Initial Study Applicant/Developer shall prepare a Stormwater Pollution Occupancy or Prevention Plan (SWPPP), listing Best Management Temporary Practices to reduce construction and post-construction Occupancy of activities to a less than significant level. Measures may Building 27 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: include, but shall not be limited to revegetation of graded areas, silt fencing and other measures. The SWPPP shall conform to standards adopted by the Regional Water Quality Control Board and City of Dublin and shall be approved by the City of Dublin Public Works Department prior to issuance of grading permits. LANDSCAPING 90. Landscaping and Street Trees. The Applicant/ PL, PW Occupancy of PW Developer shall construct all landscaping along the project Building frontage from the face of curb to the site right-of-way and all street trees proposed within the public service easements,to the design and specifications of the applicable Street Landscape Plan, City of Dublin specifications, and to the satisfaction of the City Engineer and Director of Community Development. Street tree varieties of a minimum 24-inch box size shall be planted along all street frontages and shall be as shown on the Landscape Plan. Exact tree locations,box sizes and varieties shall be reviewed and approved by the City Engineer. The proposed variety of trees to be planted adjacent to sidewalks or curbs shall be submitted for review and approval by the City Engineer. Root shields shall be required unless otherwise determined by the City Engine r and the Director of Community Development. 91. Landscaping at Intersections. Landscaping at PL, PW Completion of Standard intersections shall be such that sight distance is not Improvements obstructed. Except for trees, landscaping shall not be higher than 30 inches above the curb in these areas. 92. Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan. PL, PW Issuance of PL App I icant/Deve toper shall submit a Final Landscaping and Building Irrigation Plan, conforming to the requirements of Section Permits 8.72.030 of the Zoning Ordinance (unless otherwise required by this Resolution). The plans shall be stamped and approved by the City Engineer and the Director of Community Development. That plan should generally conform to the Planting Plan prepared by A.S. Dutchover & Associates dated received September 15,2003. It must reflect any revised project design shown on the project plans made at a later date. The Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan shall include the following requirements: a. The Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan shall be coordinated with site plan and grading and improvement plans. The Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan shall show existing landscaping to remain. b. The Applicant/Developer shall include repair of the existing tubular steel fence, brick columns and retaining wall on landscaping plan. c. The landscaping of the area north of the buildings are visible from the driveway and requires additional planting. d. Final Landscaping and Irri ation Plan shall be 28 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: submitted at 1"=20' scale. e. Final Landscaping and Irrigation Plan shall include design and treatment of the retaining walls for final review and approval of the Community Development Department. f. Applicant/Developer shall provide a 3-foot high vegetative screen between the parking lot and street, keeping drive corners and walkway sight distances clear. g. Applicant/Developer shall provide sufficient shrubs to screen the trash enclosure. The trash enclosure must be roofed. h. Applicant/Developer shall incorporate additional vines or other plantings to spill over retaining walls. Increase planting of vines to provide 10 inches on center maximum. i. Applicant/Developer shall review the use of Trachelospermum in landscaping plan,which requires shade in this climate. j. Review Conditions of Approval of the Planned Development District for compliance. k. Upon approval of a final landscaping plan,the Applicant/Developer shall submit an irrigation plan for review and approval. The design shall provide for the landscape to be irrigated by an automatic underground irrigation system utilizing efficient design for maximum water conservation. 93. Planting Review. Shrub,vine, espalier, perennial,and PL Issuance of Standard ground cover varieties shall be reviewed and approved by Building the Director of Community Development. 94. Fire-resistant or drought tolerant plant varieties. Fire- PL, F Issuance of Municipal resistant or drought tolerant plant varieties shall be Building Code required in the plant palette. Permits 95. Monument Signs. Design of monument signs shall be PL, PW Issuance of Municipal approved by the Director of Community Development to Building Code assure compatibility with design elements of the project Permits and by the City Engineer to assure unobstructed traffic visibility. 96. Backflow Devices. Backflow devices shall be hidden PL Approval of Standard from view by means of fencing, enclosures, landscaping Improvement and/or berms. Plans 97. Standard Plant Material, Irrigation System and PL Occupancy of Standard Maintenance Agreement. Applicant/Developer shall sign Building and submit a signed copy of the City of Dublin Standard Plant Material, Irrigation System and Maintenance Agreement prior to the occupancy of building. 98. Water Efficient Landscape Regulations. PL, PW, Approval of Standard Applicant/Developer shall ensure that the Final DSR Improvement Landscaping and Irrigation Plan conforms to the City's Plans Water Efficient Landscape Regulations, including dual pi pin to facilitate future recycled water. 29 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: ALAMEDA COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT, ZONE 7 99. Wells. Any water wells, cathodic protection wells or Zone 7, Issuance of Standard exploratory borings shown on the map that are known to PW Building or Site exist, are proposed or are located during field operations Improvement without a documented intent of future use, filed with Zone Permits 7, are to be destroyed prior to any demolition or construction activity in accordance with a well destruction permit obtained from Zone 7 and the Alameda County Department of Environmental Services or are to be maintained in accordance with applicable groundwater protection ordinances. Other wells encountered prior to or during construction are to be treated similarly. 100. Requirements and Fees. Applicant/Developer shall Zone 7, Issuance of Standard comply with all Alameda County Flood Control and Water PW Building Conservation District-Zone 7 Flood Control requirements Permits and applicable fees. DUBLIN SAN RAMON SERVICES DISTRICT(DSRSD) 101. Fire Line. The proposed on-site fire line shall be a public DSRSD Prior to DSRSD fire line and a 15-foot water line easement over the Approval of pipeline alignment shall be secured for DSRSD by the Improvement Applicant/Developer at no cost to DSRSD. Plans 102. Water and Sewer Extension. Applicant/Developer shall DSRSD Prior to DSRSD extend water and sewer lines on Tassajara Road to the Approval of northern boundary of Quarry Lane School property. Improvement Plans 103. Water and Sewer Annexation. Water and sewer DSRSD Prior to DSRSD annexation fees are applicable and shall be paid by the Approval of Applicant/Developer prior to permitting. Improvement Plans 104. All Applicable DSRSD Plans, Codes, Procedures, and DSRSD Prior to Issuance DSRSD Policies. Prior to issuance of any building permit, of Building complete improvement plans shall be submitted to DSRSD Permits that conform to the requirements of the Dublin San Ramon Services District Code, the DSRSD "Standard Procedures, Specifications and Drawings for Design and Installation of Water and Wastewater Facilities", all applicable DSRSD Master Plans and all DSRSD policies. _ 105. Layout and Sizing of Mains. All mains shall be sized to DSRSD Prior to DSRSD provide sufficient capacity to accommodate future flow Approval of demands in addition to each development project's Improvement demand. Layout and sizing of mains shall be in Plans conformance with DSRSD utility master planning. 106. Sewers Operate by Gravity Flow. Sewers shall be DSRSD Prior to DSRSD designed to operate by gravity flow to DSRSD's existing Approval of sanitary sewer system. Pumping of sewage is discouraged Improvement and may only be allowed under extreme circumstances Plans following a case by case review with DSRSD staff. Any pumping station will require specific review and approval by DSRSD of preliminary design reports, design criteria, and final plans and specifications. The DSRSD reserves 30 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: the right to require payment of present worth 20 year maintenance costs as well as other conditions within a separate agreement with the applicant for any project that requires a pumping station. 107. Domestic and Fire Protection Waterline Systems. DSRSD Prior to DSRSD Domestic and fire protection waterline systems for Tracts Approval of or Commercial Developments shall be designed to be Improvement looped or interconnected to avoid dead end sections in Plans accordance with requirements of the DSRSD Standard Specifications and sound engineering ractice. 108. Water and Sewer in Public Streets. DSRSD policy DSRSD Prior to DSRSD requires public water and sewer lines to be located in Approval of public streets rather than in off-street locations to the Improvement fullest extent possible. If unavoidable, then public sewer Plans or water easements must be established over the alignment of each public sewer or water line in an off-street or private street location to provide access for future maintenance and/or replacement. 109. Locations and Widths of Easement Dedications. Prior to DSRSD Prior to DSRSD approval by the City of a grading permit or a site Approval of development permit, the locations and widths of all Improvement proposed easement dedications for water and sever lines Plans shall be submitted to and approved by DSRSD. 110. Separate Instrument. All easement dedications for DSRSD Prior to DSRSD DSRSD facilities shall be by separate instrument Approval of irrevocably offered to DSRSD or by offer of dedication on Improvement the Final Map. Plans 111. DSRSD Submittal. Prior to approval by the City for DSRSD Prior to DSRSD Recordation, the Final Map shall be submitted to and approval by the approved by DSRSD for easement locations, widths, and City for restrictions. Recordation 112. Permit Fees. Prior to issuance by the City of any Building DSRSD Prior to Issuance DSRSD Permit, all utility connection fees, plan checking fees, of Building inspection fees, permit fees and fees associated with a Permits wastewater discharge permit shall be paid to DSRSD in accordance with the rates and schedules established in the DSRSD Code. 113. Signed by the District Engineer. Prior to issuance by the DSRSD Prior to Issuance DSRSD City of any Building Permit, all improvement plans for of Building DSRSD facilities shall be signed by the District Engineer. Permits Each drawing of improvement plans shall contain a signature block for the District Engineer indicating approval of the sanitary sewer or water facilities shown. Prior to approval by the District Engineer, the applicant shall pay all required DSRSD fees, and provide an engineer's estimate of construction costs for the sewer and water systems, a performance bond, a one-year maintenance bond, and a comprehensive general liability insurance policy in the amounts and forms that are acceptable to DSRSD. The applicant shall allow at least 15 working days for final improvement drawing review by DSRSD before signature by the District Engineer. 31 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: 114. Utility Construction Permit. No sewer line or waterline DSRSD Prior to Issuance DSRSD construction shall be permitted unless the proper utility of Building construction permit has been issued by DSRSD. A Permits construction permit will only be issued after all of the items in condition 9 have been satisfied. 115. Hold Harmless. The applicant shall hold DSRSD, its DSRSD On-Going DSRSD Board of Directors, commissions, employees, and agents of DSRSD harmless and indemnify and defend the same from any litigation, claims, or fines resulting from the construction and completion of the project. PASSED,APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 25th day of May, 2004. AYES: Cm. Fasulkey,Nassar, Jennings, King, and Machtmes NOES: ABSTAIN: ABSENT: zl G 'Plan'ing ommissio 'C on ATTEST: P anni g Manager GAPA#\1999\99-064 Quarry Lane\SDR\RESO.DOC; 32 RESOLUTION NO. 14-xx A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO REZONE 6363 TASSAJARA ROAD TO A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT AND APPROVING THE RELATED STAGE 1/2 DEVELOPMENT PLAN AMENDMENTS FOR THE QUARRY LANE SCHOOL PHASE III EXPANSION PLPA-2014-00008 (APN 985-0002-006-03) WHEREAS, the Applicant, Dr. Sabri Arac, Quarry Lane School, has requested approval of Site Development Review and amendments to the Development Plan for the existing Planned Development District (Ord. 24-00) to allow for 17,102 square feet of additional building area on the school site, consisting of one new building of 13,102 square feet, and the potential to add up to 4,000 square feet to existing Building One at some point in the future. The total building area would be 110,602 square feet, which would also include the square footage of Building 1 (7,611 square feet), which was an existing building on an adjacent lot that was purchased by the School in 1997 and made a part of the school campus. The added total building area is referred to herein as the "Project"; and WHEREAS, Dublin Zoning Ordinance Sections 8.32 Planned Development Regulations allows the City Council to consider amendments to an adopted Development Plan upon a finding that the amendment substantially complies with and does not materially change the provisions or intent of the adopted Planned Development; and WHEREAS, in order to permit the construction of a new cafeteria and science building, in order to document the addition of Building 1 to the Quarry Lane School campus in 1997, and in order to plan for the future expansion of Building 1 by up to 4,000 square feet, amendments were required to the Stage 1/2 Development Plan; and WHEREAS, in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act, certain projects are required to be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared; and WHEREAS, environmental review for the Project area was previously conducted and documented in the certified EIR for the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, which was adopted in 1993 (SCH No. 91-103064) and in the certified EIR for the Quarry Lane Master Plan, which was adopted in 1998 by the County of Alameda (SCH No. 97122109); and WHEREAS, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15164 and based on the Initial Study, dated April 28, 2014, the City prepared an Addendum to the prior CEQA documents. The Addendum with its supporting Initial Study, which describes the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion and its relation to the analysis in the previous environmental documents, are incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a properly noticed public hearing on the proposed Site Development Review application and Planned Development Rezone with related Stage 1/2 ATTACHMENT 3 Development Plan amendments on May 13, 2014, at which time all interested parties had the opportunity to be heard; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending that the Planning Commission adopt a resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance amending the Zoning Map to rezone the Quarry Lane School site to a Planned Development Zoning District and approving the related Stage 1/2 Development Plan amendments for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014, the Planning Commission adopted Resolution 14-xx recommending that the City Council adopt a CEQA Addendum for the project, which Resolution is incorporated herein by reference and available for review at City Hall during normal business hours; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did review the Initial Study and CEQA Addendum, all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment prior to making a recommendation on the Project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Dublin Planning Commission does hereby adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council adopt an Ordinance (Attached as Exhibit A) amending the Zoning Map to rezone the Quarry Lane School site to a Planned Development Zoning District and approving the related Stage 1/2 Development Plan amendments for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion, based on findings, including but not limited to, that the Planned Development Zoning and project as a whole is consistent and in conformance with the General Plan as proposed, is consistent with the purpose and intent of the Planned Development zoning district, and that development of the proposed project will be harmonious and compatible with existing and future development in the surrounding area. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chair ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director ORDINANCE NO. xx — 14 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO REZONE THE QUARRY LANE SCHOOL SITE TO A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT AND APPROVING THE RELATED STAGE 112 DEVELOPMENT PLAN AMENDMENTS FOR THE QUARRY LANE SCHOOL PHASE III EXPANSION PLPA-2014-00008 (APN 985-0002-006-03) The Dublin City Council does ordain as follows: SECTION 1: Findings A. Pursuant to Section 8.32.070 of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council finds as follows. 1. The Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project ("the Project") PD-Planned Development zoning meets the purpose and intent of Chapter 8.32 in that it provides a comprehensive development plan that creates a desirable use of land that is sensitive to surrounding land uses by virtue of the layout and design of the site plan. 2. Development of the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project under the PD- Planned Development zoning will be harmonious and compatible with existing and future development in the surrounding area in that the site will continue to provide a private compulsory education facility to the community in a location where it has existed for many, years. B. Pursuant to Sections 8.120.050.A and B of the Dublin Municipal Code, the City Council finds as follows. 1. The PD-Planned Development zoning for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project will be harmonious and compatible with existing and potential development in the surrounding area in that the proposed Site Plan has taken into account sensitive adjacencies and will continue to provide a private compulsory education facility to the community in a location where it has existed for many years.. 2. The project site conditions were documented in the previous environmental documents, and the environmental impacts that have been identified will be mitigated to the greatest degree possible. There are no site challenges that were identified in the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration that will present an impediment to utilization of the site for the intended purposes. There are no major physical or topographic constraints and thus the site is physically suitable for the type and intensity of development approved through the PD zoning. 3. The PD-Planned Development zoning will not adversely affect the health or safety of persons residing or working in the vicinity, or be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare in that the project will comply with all applicable development regulations and standards and will implement all adopted mitigation measures. EXHIBIT A TO ATTACHMENT 3 4. The PD-Planned Development zoning is consistent with and in conformance with the Dublin General Plan, as amended, in that the continued use as a private K-12 school is consistent with the Medium Density Residential land use designation for the site. C. Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act, the City Council adopted an Addendum via Resolution -14 on prior to approving the Project. SECTION 2: Pursuant to Chapter 8.32, Title 8 of the City of Dublin Municipal-Code the City of Dublin Zoning Map is amended to rezone the property described below to a Planned Development Zoning District: 10.0 acres at 6363 Tassajara Road. APN 985-0002-006-03. ("the Property"). A map of the rezoning area is shown below: Quarry Lane 1t4a" Sch©ol 3 2 SECTION 3. The regulations for the use, development, improvement, and maintenance of the Property are set forth in the following Stage 1/2 Development Plan for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project area, which is hereby approved. Any amendments to the Stage 1/2 Development Plan shall be in accordance with section 8.32.080 of the Dublin Municipal Code or its successors. Stage 1/2 Development Plan for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project This is a Stage 1/2 Development Plan pursuant to Chapter 8.32 of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance. This Development Plan is adopted as part of the PD-Planned Development rezoning for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project, PLPA-2014-00008. The PD-Planned Development District and this Stage 1/2 Development Plan provides flexibility to encourage innovative development while ensuring that the goals, policies, and action programs of the General Plan and provisions of Chapter 8.32 of the Zoning Ordinance are satisfied. 1. Zoning. The Zoning for the subject property is PD-Planned Development (PLPA-2014- 00008). 2. Statement of Permitted Uses. Permitted Uses (as defined by the Zoning Ordinance): Private School: 1. Kindergarten through High School Grades 2. After school care 3. Recreational Play fields Similar and related uses as determined by the Director of Community Development Conditional Uses: All conditional uses in the Dublin Zoning Ordinance for the R-1 Residential Zoning District are conditionally allowed uses in this Planned Development Zoning District. Prohibited Uses: All those not specifically listed herein as permitted or conditionally permitted. 3. Stage 1/2 Site Plan. The Stage 1/2 Development Plan is shown below and is also included as Sheet AS1.0 in the Project Plan Set, dated received April 29, 2014, on file at the Community Development Department. 3 �y�a He '° : f '' G ot GEE P-HG ��xl " o II _ _- r l U j11° TmDP.A I ,a , a (EJ,G SLiCAff - " �d f IRO sue." FENG, He , `•h T� ��hl1 � I NC (E7 50 PAPPmGti y (E)BU LDING 1 3' 1 ` �' CE/uBMRVrmG .(' CL () xNG$ Ne NO SM i RPH BC1A MNwG � 4 Flnun aewe �1 VIII T 2� I 9 rl ''�2�4` E �L HMI,S I ai 8 I 3 la �(E si N 03241E'! 51 }r 7_7 — _- `. ----.- - TASSNAHN FGFD 4. Site area, proposed densities, and development regulations. Maximum Student 950 students (200 Preschool and Kindergarten, 600 Elementary Population and Middle School, 150 High School) Maximum Faculty and 55 Staff No. of Classrooms 51 Maximum Building Area 110,602 Floor to Area Ratio .253 - - - - Parking Spaces 149 spaces (minimum required per parking analysis conducted in 2004) Maximum Building Height: 59 feet Minimum Lot Size None Maximum lot coverage 25% Parking Stall Dimensions Per Chapter 8.76 Off-Street Parking And Loading Regulations of Standards the Dublin Zoning Ordinance Minimum Setbacks 20' front yard setback 9'8" side yard setback 20' rear yard setback 4 5. Phasing Plan. The project site will be developed in phases. 6. Preliminary Landscape Plan. As shown in the Site Development Review approvals for the various project phases (PA 99-064 and PLPA-2014-0008). 7. Architectural Standards. The design of future buildings on the project site shall be architecturally compatible with the existing Building 2 (Preschool and Elementary School) and Building 3 (Middle and High School Building) including the standing seam metal roof with decorative eave corbels and a simple cement plaster finish painted to match the existing buildings. The window design and placement on future buildings will also be complementary to the other buildings on the school campus. 8. Consistency with General Plan and any applicable Specific Plan. The proposed project is consistent with the General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. 9. Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. The Inclusionary Zoning Regulations do not regulate non-residential projects, so therefore this is not applicable. 10.Aerial Photo. An aerial photo is on file with the Community Development Department. 11.Applicable Requirements of Dublin Zoning Ordinance. Except as specifically provided in this Stage 1/2 Development Plan, the use, development, improvement and maintenance of the property shall be governed by the R-1 (Single Family Residential Zoning District) provisions of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance pursuant to Section 8.32.060.C. No development shall occur on this property until a Site Development Review permit has been approved for the property. 12.Compliance with adopted Mitigation Measures. The Applicant/Developer shall comply with all applicable action programs and mitigation measures of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and General Plan Amendment EIR, the Quarry Lane EIR, the Quarry Lane School Phase II expansion Mitigated Negative Declaration, and the Quarry Lane School Phase III CEQA Addendum to the previous environmental documents. SECTION 4. The City Clerk of the City of Dublin shall cause this Ordinance to be posted in at least three (3) public places in the City of Dublin in accordance with Section 36933 of the Government Code of the State of California. SECTION 5. This ordinance shall take effect and be enforced thirty (30) days from and after its passage. PASSED AND ADOPTED BY the City Council of the City of Dublin, on this day of 2014, by the following votes: 5 AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Mayor ATTEST: City Clerk 6 RESOLUTION NO. 14-xx A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL APPROVE SITE DEVELOPMENT REVIEW FOR A NEW 13,102 SQUARE FOOT BUILDING AT QUARRY LANE SCHOOL 6363 TASSAJARA ROAD PLPA-2014-00008 APN 985-0002-006-03 WHEREAS, the Applicant, Dr. Sabri Arac, Quarry Lane School, has requested approval of Site Development Review and amendments to the Development Plan for the existing Planned Development District (Ord. 24-00) to allow for 17,102 square feet of additional building area on the school site, consisting of one new building of 13,102 square feet, and the potential to add up to 4,000 square feet to existing Building One at some point in the future. The total building area would be 110,602 square feet, which would also include the square footage of Building 1 (7,611 square feet), which was an existing building on an adjacent lot that was purchased by the School in 1997 and made a part of the school campus. The added total building area is referred to herein as the "Project"; and WHEREAS, Site Development Review approval is being sought only for the development of a 13,102 square foot cafeteria and science building constructed on a portion of the site that is between a two-story building (Building 1) and an upper parking lot with limited visibility of the new building from Tassajara Road. A complete Site Development Review application for the project is available and on file in the Dublin Planning Department; and WHEREAS, the Project area was previously analyzed in the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, which was adopted in 1993 and has a certified Program EIR (SCH No. 91-103064) and analyzed in the Quarry Lane Master Plan, which was adopted in 1998 by the County of Alameda and has a certified EIR (SCH No. 97122109). In 2000, the City of Dublin approved a Planned Development District Stage 1 and 2 Development Plan for the project (City Council Ordinance 24-00), and adopted an Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration (City Council Resolution 204-00), incorporated herein by reference); and WHEREAS, in 2004, the Planning Commission approved Site Development Review, a Conditional Use Permit, and adopted a CEQA Addendum to allow the construction of Phase II of Quarry Lane School and the associated minor amendments to the approved Development Plan (PC Resolution 04-46, incorporated herein by reference); and WHEREAS, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15162, the City of Dublin prepared an Initial Study to determine if additional environmental review was required for the Project beyond the prior EIRs and Mitigated Negative Declaration. The Initial Study determined that the project would not require major revisions to the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration because the Project would not have new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects. Because the overall site building envelope, amount of urbanized area, and student and staff population were unchanged, the impacts and appropriate mitigations are the same and no new mitigations are required. Furthermore, the Initial Study determined that there was no change in circumstances that would result in new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects because no new or unanticipated ATTACHMENT 4 circumstances have developed since the previous EIRs were certified, the previous Mitigated Negative Declaration was adopted, and the previous Addendum was adopted; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated May 13, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, described and analyzed the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion, including the Site Development Review application and the proposed Planned Development Rezoning/Development Plan amendment, for the Planning Commission; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a properly noticed public hearing on the Project, including the proposed Site Development Review application and the proposed Planned Development Rezoning/Development Plan amendment, on May 13, 2014, at which time all interested parties had the opportunity to be heard; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission considered the Initial Study and CEQA Addendum, all above-referenced reports, recommendations, and testimony to evaluate the Project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT THE City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby find that: A. The proposal is consistent with the purposes of Chapter 8.104 (Site Development Review) of the Zoning Ordinance, with the General Plan, and any applicable Specific Plans and design guidelines because: the colors and materials of the new building will match those of the Buildings 2 and 3, including the standing seam metal roof with decorative eave corbels and a simple cement plaster finish painted to match the existing buildings. The window design and placement will also complement the other buildings on the school campus. Although the new building has been designed to be consistent with the other school buildings in order to create a unified aesthetic, it will have limited visibility from Tassajara Road due to its placement behind Building 1. B. The proposal is consistent with the provisions of Title 8, Zoning Ordinance because: 1) The architecture and landscape design for the new building are well-suited to the proposed use; 2) the overall design of the project is consistent with the design requirements of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Development Plan; 3) the proposed project is consistent with the General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan land use designation of Medium Density Residential in that a private school is considered a community facility, a use that can be permitted in any zoning district and land use designation; and 4) the proposed project meets the intent of the Dublin General Plan, which discourages projects that do not relate well to the surrounding developments and the proposed project is compatible with the surrounding neighborhood that is primarily residential uses. C. The design of the project is appropriate to the City, the vicinity, surrounding properties, and the lot(s) in which the project is proposed because: 1) The architecture and landscape design for the new building are well-suited to the proposed use; 2) the overall design of the project is consistent with the design requirements of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Development Plan; 3) the proposed project is consistent with the General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan land use designation of Medium Density Residential in that a private school is 2 considered a community facility, a use that can be permitted in any zoning district and land use designation; 4) the proposed project meets the intent of the Dublin General Plan, which discourages projects that do not relate well to the surrounding developments and the proposed project is compatible with the surrounding neighborhood that is primarily residential uses; and the overall intensity of use of the site is not proposed to increase in that the maximum student population and other similar factors are not proposed to increase. D. The subject site is suitable for the type and intensity of the approved development because: 1) the project site has been home to Quarry Lane School since the late 1990's and the use is proposed to continue; and 2) although the amount of developable building area is proposed to increase, the intensity of use of the site is not proposed to change in that the total maximum student population, the maximum number of faculty and staff members, and the number of classrooms are not proposed to increase. The proposed additional building area (in the form of the new cafeteria and science building and the future expansion to Building 1) is intended to serve the existing student population. E. Impacts to existing slopes and topographic features are addressed because: 1) development of the project site will involve a small amount of grading (estimated 750 cubic yards) and the installation of a new 5 foot tall retaining wall to create a flat building pad for the new building; 2) the roadway and utility infrastructure to serve the site already exists, 3) future approval of grading and improvement plans will enable the site to be modified to suit the project, which will be developed for the site in accordance with City policies and regulations; and 4) the project complies with the Planned Development Zoning District established for the site pursuant to provisions and policies of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan, including the Tassajara Road Scenic Corridor Policy. F. Architectural considerations including the character, scale and quality of the design, site layout, the architectural relationship with the site and other buildings, screening of unsightly uses, lighting, building materials and colors and similar elements result in a project that is harmonious with its surroundings and compatible with other developments in the vicinity because: the colors and materials of the new building will match those of the Buildings 2 and 3, including the standing seam metal roof with decorative eave corbels and a simple cement plaster finish painted to match the existing buildings. The window design and placement will also complement the other buildings on the school campus. Although the new building has been designed to be consistent with the other school buildings in order to create a unified aesthetic, it will have limited visibility from Tassajara Road due to its placement behind Building 1 G. Landscape considerations, including the location, type, size, color, texture and coverage of plant materials, and similar elements have been incorporated into the project to ensure visual relief, adequate screening and an attractive environment for the public because: 1) site grading and retaining walls have been minimized by the stepped, hillside design of the building so that the site is physically suitable for the type and intensity of the development; and 2) there are seven trees that are proposed to be removed from the project site, including four eucalyptus, two redwoods (with trunk diameters of 10 inches and 12 inches) and one Mexican fan palm tree, which are located in areas that are to receive significant grading. All other landscaping is to remain on site, and the newly-created slope areas are to be planted with groundcover. H. The site has been adequately designed to ensure the proper circulation for bicyclist, pedestrians, and automobiles because: 1) site infrastructure including driveways, pathways, 3 sidewalks, and site lighting is already in place and the new pathways leading to the new building have been reviewed for conformance with City policies, regulations, and best practices. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Planning Commission of the City of Dublin does hereby recommend that the City Council approve Site Development Review for a new 13,102 square foot building at Quarry Lane School, with the Project Plans included as Exhibit A to this Resolution, subject to the conditions included below. CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL: Unless stated otherwise, all Conditions of Approval shall be complied with prior to the issuance of building permits or establishment of use, and shall be subject to Planning Department review and approval. The following codes represent those departments/agencies responsible for monitoring compliance of the conditions of approval. [PL.] Planning, [B] Building, [PO] Police, [PW] Public Works [P&CS] Parks & Community Services, [ADM] Administration/City Attorney, [FIN] Finance, [F] Alameda County Fire Department, [DSR] Dublin San Ramon Services District, [CO] Alameda County Department of Environmental Health, [Z7] Zone 7. CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: GENERAL CONDITIONS - SITE DEVELOPMENT REVIEW 1. Approval. This Site Development Review approval PL Ongoing Planning for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project establishes the detailed design concepts and regulations for the project. Development pursuant to this Site Development Review approval shall generally conform to the project plans submitted by Innovate Space dated received April 29, 2014 and on file in the Community Development Department, and other plans, text, and diagrams — including the color and material sheet — relating to this Site Development Review approval, unless modified by the Conditions of Approv aI contained herein. 2. Permit Expiration. Approval of this Site PL One year After DMC Development Review approval shall be valid for one Effective Date 8.96.020. (1) year from the approval of the project by the D Planning Commission. This approval shall be null and void in the event the approved use fails to be established within the prescribed time. Commencement of the use means the establishment of use pursuant to the Permit approval or, demonstrating substantial progress toward commencing such use. If there is a dispute as to whether the Permit has expired, the City may hold a noticed public hearing to determine the matter. Such a determination may be processed concurrently with revocation proceedings in appropriate circumstances. If a Permit expires, a new application must be made and processed according to the requirements of this Ordinance. 3. Time Extension. The original approving decision- PL One Year DMC maker may, upon the Applicant's written request for Following 8.96.020. 4 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: an extension of approval prior to expiration, upon the Expiration E determination that all Conditions of Approval remain Date adequate and all applicable findings of approval will continue to be met, grant an extension of the approval for a period not to exceed six (6) months. Subsequent six month extensions may be granted at the discretion of the Community Development Director. All time extension requests shall be noticed and a public hearing shall be held before the original hearing body. 4. Compliance. The Applicant/Property Owner shall PL On-going DMC operate this use in compliance with the Conditions of 8.96.020.F Approval of this Site Development Review, the approved plans and the regulations established in the Zoning Ordinance. Any violation of the terms or conditions specified may be subject to enforcement action. 5. Effective Date. This approval shall become effective PL Ongoing Planning after the Site Development Review approval appeal period has expired. The approval is contingent on the City Council adopting an Ordinance approving a Planned Development Rezone with a related Stage 2 Development Plan amendment for the project. If this action does not take place, the Site Development Review approval is null and void. 6. Revocation of Permit. The Site Development PL On-going DMC Review approval shall be revocable for cause in 8.96.020.1 accordance with Section 8.96.020.1 of the Dublin Zoning Ordinance. Any violation of the terms or conditions of this permit shall be subject to citation. 7. Requirements and Standard Conditions. The Various Building Standard Applicant/ Developer shall comply with applicable City Permit of Dublin Fire Prevention Bureau, Dublin Public Issuance Works Department, Dublin Building Department, Dublin Police Services, Alameda County Flood Control District Zone 7, Livermore Amador Valley Transit Authority, Alameda County Public and Environmental Health, Dublin San Ramon Services District and the California Department of Health Services requirements and standard conditions. Prior to issuance of building permits or the installation of any improvements related to this project, the Developer shall supply written statements from each such agency or department to the Planning Department, indicating that all applicable conditions required have been or will be met. 8. Required Permits. Developer shall obtain all permits PW Building Standard required by other agencies including, but not limited Permit to Alameda County Environmental Health, Alameda Issuance County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (Zone 7), California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Army Corps of Engineers, Regional Water Quality Control Board, Caltrans, or other regional/state agencies as required by law. Copies of the permits 5 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: shall be provided to the Public Works Department. 9. Fees. Applicant/Developer shall pay all applicable Various Building Various fees in effect at the time of building permit issuance, Permit including, but not limited to, Planning fees, Building Issuance fees, Traffic Impact Fees, TVTC fees, Dublin San Ramon Services District fees, Public Facilities fees, Dublin Unified School District School Impact fees, Fire Facilities Impact fees, Alameda County Flood and Water Conservation District (Zone 7) Drainage and Water Connection fees; or any other fee that may be adopt d and applicable. 10. Indemnification. The Developer shall defend, ADM On-going Administra indemnify, and hold harmless the City of Dublin and tion/ its agents, officers, and employees from any claim, City action, or proceeding against the City of Dublin or its Attorney agents, officers, or employees to attack, set aside, void, or annul an approval of the City of Dublin or its advisory agency, appeal board, Planning Commission, City Council, Community Development Director, Zoning Administrator, or any other department, committee, or agency of the City to the extent such actions are brought within the time period required by Government Code Section 66499.37 or other applicable law; provided, however, that The Developer's duty to so defend, indemnify, and hold harmless shall be subject to the City's promptly notifying The Developer of any said claim, action, or proceeding and the City's full cooperation in the defense of such actions or proceedings. 11. Clarification of Conditions. In the event that there PW On-going Public needs to be clarification to the Conditions of Approval, Works the Community Development Director and the City Engineer have the authority to clarify the intent of these Conditions of Approval to the Developer without going to a public hearing. The Director of Community Development and the City Engineer also have the authority to make minor modifications to these conditions without going to a public hearing in order for the Applicant/Developer to fulfill needed improvements or mitigations resulting from impacts to this proje ct. 12. Clean-up. The Applicant/Developer shall be PL On-going Planning responsible for clean-up and disposal of project related trash to maintain a safe, clean, and litter-free site. 13. Modifications. Modifications or changes to this Site PL On-going DMC Development Review approval may be considered by 8.104 the Community Development Director in compliance with Chapter 8.104 of the Zoning Ordinance and in compliance with the Subdivision Ordinance. 14. Archaeology. Should any prehistoric, cultural, or PL During Planning historic artifacts be exposed during excavation and Construction 6 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: construction operations, the Department of Community Development shall be notified and work shall cease immediately until an archaeologist, who is certified by the Society of California Archaeology (SCA) or the Society of Professional Archaeology (SOPA), is consulted to evaluate the significance of the find and suggest appropriate mitigation measures, if deemed necessary, prior to resuming ground breaking construction activities. Standardized procedures for evaluating accidental finds and discovery of human remains shall be followed as prescribed in Sections 15064.5 and 15126.4 of the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines. Compliance with this condition required throughout construction. PLANNING DIVISION - PROJECT SPECIFIC CONDITIONS 15. Equipment Screening. All electrical equipment, fire PL Building Planning risers, and/or mechanical equipment shall be Permit screened from public view by landscaping and/or Issuance architectural features. Any roof-mounted equipment and shall be completely screened from adjacent street Through view by materials architecturally compatible with the Completion/ building and to the satisfaction of the Community On-going Development Director. The Building Permit plans shall show the location of all equipment and screening for review and approval by the Director of Community Develop ment. 16. Quarry Lane School Master Plan, Quarry Lane PL On-going Quarry Environmental Impact Report and Quarry Lane Lane School Phase II Project Mitigated Negative School EIR and Declaration. Applicant/Developer shall comply with Mitigat ed ed all applicable conditions of approval, action programs Negative and mitigation measures of the Quarry Lane School Declaration Master Plan and companion Environmental Impact Report and Mitigated Negative Declaration deemed a licable by the Community Development Director. 17. Colors. The exterior paint colors of the buildings PL Occupancy Planning shall be in compliance with the Color and Material Board approved with the Project Plans and shall match the paint color of the other buildings on the school campus. The Applicant shall paint a small portion of the building the approved colors for review and approval by the Director of Community Development prior to painting the entire buildings, whose a proval shall not be unreasonably withheld. 18. Construction Trailer. The Applicant/Developer shall PL Establishment Planning obtain a Temporary Use Permit prior to the of the establishment of any construction trailer, storage temporary use shed, or container units on the project site. 19. Final Building and Site Improvement Plans shall PL Issuance of Planning be reviewed and approved by the Community Building Develop ment Department staff prior to the issuance Permits 7 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: of a building permit. All such plans shall insure: a. That standard non-residential security requirements as established by the Dublin Police Department are provided. b. That ramps, special parking spaces, signing, and other appropriate physical features for the disabled, are provided throughout the site for all publicly used facilities. c. That continuous concrete curbing is provided for all parking stalls, if necessary. d. That exterior lighting of the building and site is not directed onto adjacent properties and the light source is shielded from direct offsite viewing. e. That all mechanical equipment, including air conditioning condensers, are architecturally screened from view, and that electrical transformers are either underground, architecturally screened, or screened by landscape of an adequate size. Electrical and gas meters shall be screened to the greatest degree possible. f. That all vents, gutters, downspouts, flashings, etc., are painted to match the color of adjacent surface. g. That all materials and colors are to be as approved by the Dublin Community Development Department. Once constructed or installed, all improvements are to be maintained in accordance with the approved plans. Any changes, which affect the exterior character, shall be resubmitted to the Dublin Community Development Department for approval. h. That all exterior architectural elements visible from view and not detailed on the plans be finished in a style and in materials in harmony with the exterior of the building. All materials shall wrap to the inside corners and terminate at a perpendicular wall plane. i. That all other public agencies that require review of the project are supplied with copies of the final building and site plans and that compliance is obtained with at least their minimum Code requirements. BUILDING — GENERAL CONDITIONS 20. Building Codes issues to address in Permit B Issuance of B Submittal: Building 1. Due to the distance of the new building to existing Permit(s) and building #1 and to the south property line a rated approval of the Final Map 8 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: exterior wall, parapet and protected openings shall be designed. These will be reviewed more closely during the permit application submittal. 2. Provide details and breakdown for the long-term bicycle rack storage. Location should be the most practical and closer to the new building. 3. Note that the solar zones required per Section 110.10 of the 2013 CA Energy Code will be in place as of July 1, 2014. If the construction drawings will be submitted for building permit prior to July 1, 2014, this comment can be waived. Please note that the requirement for the solar zone can affect the roof design. 4. Revise the plumbing calculations and use accurate numbers shown under the current 2013 California Plumbing Code. Use Table A first to determine the total occupant load (this is based on the square footage of the building) and then Table 422.1 to determine the minimum number of fixtures. It appears the calculations are deficient of plumbing fixtures. 21. Building Codes and Ordinances. All project B Through Building construction shall conform to all building codes and Completion ordinances in effect at the time of building permit. 22. HVAC Systems. Air conditioning units and ventilation PL, B Occupancy of Building ducts shall be screened from adjacent street view any tenant with materials compatible to the main building. Units space shall be permanently installed on concrete pads or other non-movable materials to be approved by the Building Official and Director of Community Develop ment. 23. Building Permits. To apply for building permits, B Issuance of Building Applicant/Developer shall submit five (5) sets of Building construction plans to the Building & Safety Division Permits for plan check. Each set of plans shall have attached an annotated copy of these Conditions of Approval. The notations shall clearly indicate how all Conditions of Approval will or have been complied with. Construction plans will not be accepted without the annotated resolutions attached to each set of plans. Applicant/Developer will be responsible for obtaining the approvals of all participation non-City agencies prior to the issuance of building permits. 24. Construction Drawings. Construction plans shall be B Issuance of Building fully dimensioned (including building elevations) Building accurately drawn (depicting all existing and proposed Permits conditions on site), and prepared and signed by a California licensed Architect or Engineer. All structural calculations shall be prepared and signed by a California licensed Architect or Engineer. The site plan, landscape plan and details shall be consistent with each other. 9 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: 25. Addressing. Address will be required on all doors B Occupancy of Building leading to the exterior of the building. Address any building numbers/letters shall be in a contrasting color to the and ongoing surface on which they are applied and be able to be seen from the street, 4 inches in height minimum. 26. Engineer Observation. A Special Inspector shall be B Frame Building retained to provide observation services for all Inspection components of the lateral and vertical design of the building, including nailing, hold-downs, straps, shear, roof diaphragm and structural frame of building. A written report shall be submitted to the City Inspector prior to s heduling the final frame inspection. 27. Foundation. Geotechnical Engineer for the soils B Issuance of Building report shall review and approve the foundation Building design. A letter shall be submitted to the Building Permits Division on the approval. 28. CAL Green Building Standards Code. The project B Issuance of Building shall incorporate the requirements of the CAL Green Building Building Standards Code. The project shall be Permits provided with: a) short term bicycle parking, b) designated clean air vehicle parking stall, c) conduit installed from the electrical supply panel to the roof for the installation of future PV, d) automatic irrigation controllers for landscaping. The Green Building Plan shall be submitted to the Chief Building Official for review. 29. Cool Roofs. Flat roof areas shall have their roofing B Through Building material (including gravel) coated or painted with light Completion colored or reflective material designed for Cool Roofs. 30. Electronic File. The Applicant/Developer shall submit B Prior to First Building all building drawings and specifications for this project and Final in an electronic format to the satisfaction of the Inspection Building Official prior to the issuance of building permits. Additionally, all revisions made to the building plans during the project shall be incorporated into an "As Built' electronic file and submitted prior to the issuance of the final occupancy. 31. Copies of Approved Plans. Applicant shall provide B 30 days After Building City with 4 reduced (1/2 size) copies of the approved Permit and plan. Each Revision Issuance 32. Temporary Construction Fencing. Temporary B Beginning of Building Construction fencing shall be installed along work onsite perimeter of all work under construction. FIRE — GENERAL CONDITIONS 33. Code compliance. The Applicant/Developer shall F During Fire comply with all applicable Fire and Building Codes in Construction effect at the time of building permit application. 34. New Fire Sprinkler System & Monitoring F Prior to Fire Requirements. In accordance with The Dublin Fire issuance of Code, fire sprinklers shall be installed in the building. Building The s stem shall be in accordance with the NFPA 13, Permits 10 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: the CA Fire Code and CA Building Code. Plans and specifications showing detailed mechanical design, cut sheets, listing sheets and hydraulic calculations shall be submitted to the Fire Department for approval and permit prior to installation. This may be a deferred submittal. 35. Fire Alarm (detection) System Required F Prior to Fire A Fire Alarm-Detection System shall be installed Occupancy throughout the building so as to provide full property protection, including combustible concealed spaces, as required by NFPA 72. The system shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 72, CA Fire, Building, Electrical, and Mechanical Codes. If the system is intended to serve as an evacuation system, compliance with the horn/strobe requirements for the entire building must also be met. All automatic fire extinguishing systems shall be interconnected to the fire alarm system so as to activate an alarm if activated and to monitor control valves. Delayed e ress locks shall meet requirements of C.F.C. 36. Fire Extinguishers. Extinguishers shall be visible F Prior to Fire and unobstructed. Signage shall be provided to Occupancy indicate fire extinguisher locations. The number and and ongoing location of extinguishers shall be shown on the plans. Additional fire extinguishers maybe required by the fire inspector. Fire extinguisher shall meet a minimum classification of 2A 1013C. Extinguishers weighing 40 pounds or less shall be mounted no higher than 5 feet above the floor measured to the top of the extinguisher. Extinguishers shall be inspected monthly and serviced by a licensed concern annually. 37. FD Building Key Box for Building Access. A Fire F Prior to Fire Department Key Box shall be installed at the main Occupancy entrance to the Building. Note these locations on the plans. The key box should be installed approximately 5 1/2 feet above grade. The box shall be sized to hold the master key to the facility as well as keys for rooms not accessible by the master key. Specialty keys, such as the fire alarm control box key and elevator control keys shall also be installed in the box. Key boxes and switches may be ordered directly from the Knox Company at www.knoxbox.com 38. Main Entrance Hardware Exception. F Prior to Fire It is recommended that all doors be provided with exit Occupancy hardware that allows exiting from the egress side even when the door is in the locked condition. However, an exception for A-3, B, F, M, S occupancies and all churches does allow key-locking hardware (no thumb-turns) on the main exit when the main exit consists of a single door or pair of doors. When unlocked the single door or both leaves of a pair of doors must be free to swing without operation of any I tching device. A readily visible, durable sign 11 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: on or just above the door stating "This door to remain unlocked whenever the building is occupied" shall be provided. The sign shall be in letters not less than 1 inch high on a contrasting background. This use of this exception may be revoked for cause. 39. Exit signs shall be visible and illuminated with F Ongoing Fire emer enc y lighting when building is occupied. 40. Posting of room capacity is required for any occupant F Ongoing Fire load of 50 or more persons. Submittal of a seating plan on 8.5" x 11" paper is required prior to final occupancy. 41. Air moving systems supplying air in excess of 2,000 F Ongoing Fire cubic feet per minute to enclosed spaces within buildings shall be equipped with an automatic shutoff. Automatic shutoff shall be accomplished by interrupting the power source of the air moving equipment upon detection of smoke in the main supply air duct served by such equipment. Smoke detectors shall be labeled by an approved agency approved and listed by California State Fire Marshal for air duct installation and shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's approved installation instructions. 42. Interior Finishes. Wall and ceiling interior finish F Prior to Fire material shall meet the requirements of Chapter 8 of Occupancy the California Fire Code. Interior finishes will be field and Ongoing verified upon final inspection. If the product is not field marked and the marking visible for inspection, maintain the products cut-sheets and packaging that show proof of the products flammability and flame-spread ratings. Decorative materials shall be fire retardant. 43. Fire Access. Access roads, turnarounds, pullouts, F During Fire and fire operation areas are Fire Lanes and shall be construction maintained clear and free of obstructions, including and ongoing the parking of vehicles. 44. Entrances. Entrances to job sites shall not be F During Fire blocked, including after hours, other than by approved construction ates/barriers that provide for emergency access. and ongoing 45. Site Utilities. Site utilities that would require the F Prior to Fire access road to be dug up or made impassible shall be construction installed. commencing 46. Fire Access. Fire access is required to be approved F Priot to Fire all-weather access. Show on the plans the location of issuance of the all-weather access and a description of the building construction. Access road must be designed to permits and support the imposed loads of fire apparatus. . ongoing Entrance flare, angle of departure, width, turning radii, grades, turnaround, vertical clearances, road surface, bridges/crossings, gates/key-switch, & within required 150-ft. distance to Fire Lane 12 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: 47. FIRE SAFETY DURING CONSTRUCTION AND F During Fire DEMOLITION Demolition/ 1. Clearance to combustibles from temporary heating Construction devices shall be maintained. Devices shall be fixed in and Ongoing place and protected from damage, dislodgement or overturning in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. 2. Smoking shall be prohibited except in approved areas. Signs shall be posted "NO SMOKING" in a conspicuous location in each structure or location in which smoking is prohibited. 3. Combustible debris, rubbish and waste material shall be removed from buildings at the end of each shift of work. 4. Flammable and combustible liquid storage areas shall be maintained clear of combustible vegetation and waste materials. PUBLIC WORKS — PROJECT SPECIFIC 48. Clarifications and Changes to the Conditions. PW Prior to Public In the event that there needs to be clarification to Approval of Works these Conditions of Approval, the Directors of Grading/Sitew Community Development and Public Works have ork Permit the authority to clarify the intent of these Conditions of Approval to the Applicant (Developer) by a written document signed by the Directors of Community Development and Public Works and placed in the project file. The Directors also have the authority to make minor modifications to these conditions without going to a public hearing in order for the Applicant to fulfill needed improvements or miti ations resulting from impacts of this project. 49. Standard Public Works Conditions of Approval. PW Prior to Public Applicant/Developer shall comply with all applicable Approval of Works City of Dublin Public Works Standard Conditions of Improvement Approval. In the event of a conflict between the Plans Public Works Standard Conditions of Approval and these Conditions, these Conditions shall prevail. 5o. Hold Harmless/Indemnification. PW Through Public The Developer shall defend, indemnify, and hold completion of Works harmless the City of Dublin and its agents, officers, Improvements and employees from any claim, action, or and proceeding against the City of Dublin or its advisory Occupancy of agency, appeal board, Planning Commission, City the Building Council, Community Development Director, Zoning Administrator, or any other department, committee, or agency of the City to the extend such actions are brought within the time period required by Government Code Section 66499.37 or other applicable law: provided, however, that the Developer's duty to so defend, indemnify, and hold harmless shall be subject to the City's promptly notifying the Developer of any said claim, action, or roceed ng and the City's full cooperation in the 13 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: defense of such actions or proceedings. 51. Grad ing/Demolition/Sitework Permit. PW Prior to Public The applicant shall apply for and obtain a Issuance of Works Grading/Sitework Permit from the Public Works Grading/Sitew Department for all site improvement or grading work. ork Permit The Grad ing/Sitework Permit will be based on the final set of civil plans and will not be issued until all of plan check comments have been resolved. A copy of Grading/Sitework Permit application may be found on the City's website at: https://ca-dublin.civicplus.com/index.aspx?NID=340 The current cost of the permit is $102.00 and is due at the time of permit issuance. The Applicant will also be responsible for any adopted increases to the fee amount or additional fees for inspection of the work. 52. Site Plan. PW Prior to Public On-site improvements shall be designed in Issuance of Works accordance with the approved site plan entitled Grading/Sitew "Quarry Lane School Dining Hall and Science ork Permit Building, 6363 Tassajara Road" prepared by Innovative Space Architect, dated 3/28/2014 and these Condition of Approval. 53. Vehicle Parking. PW Prior to Public Applicant shall repair all distressed areas of Occupancy Works pavement as identified in the field by the City. The parking spaces striping that is in poor condition shall be re-striped. All parking spaces shall be double striped using 4" white lines set approximately 2 feet apart according to City standards and §8.76.070 (A) 17 of the Dublin Municipal Code. All compact-sized parking spaces shall have the word "COMPACT" stenciled on the pavement within each space. 12"- wide concrete step-out curbs shall be constructed at each parking space where one or both sides abuts a landsca ed area or planter. 54. Site Accessibility Requirements. PW Prior to Public All parking spaces for the disabled, and other Occupancy Works physical site improvements shall comply with current California Building Code Title 24 requirements and Cit of Dublin Standards for accessibility. 14 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: 55. ADA access: The Applicant/Developer shall upgrade PW Prior to Public facilities to comply with current Title 24 standards. Issuance of Works 1. Install Accessibility signs at Disabled Access Building Permit Parking spaces per CBC Section 11298.4. 2. Upgrade curb ramps with ramps conforming to current standards for grade and tactile elements (truncated domes). 3. Upgrade accessible path of travel to conform to the current standards for grades — cross slope not exceeding 2% and longitudinal slopes not exceeding 8.33% with hand rails or 5% without hand rails. 4. Install Accessible path from Building 1 and Building 2 to Trash Enclosure. 5. The existing crosswalk across the main drive aisle has a cross slope exceeding 2%. Existing grades and paving shall be modified to provide cross slope not-to-exceed 2%. 56. Graffiti. The Applicant/Developer and/or building PL, PW On-going Public tenant(s) shall keep the site clear of graffiti vandalism Works on a regular and continuous basis. Graffiti resistant paint for the structures and film for windows or glass shall be used whenever possible. 57. Occupancy Permit Requirements. Prior to issuance PW Prior to Public of an Occupancy Permit, the physical condition of the Occupancy Works project site shall meet minimum health and safety standards including, but not limited to the following: 1. Lighting for the building and parking lot shall be adequate for safety and security. Exterior lighting shall be provided for building entrances/exits and pedestrian walkways. Security lighting shall be provided as required by Dublin Police. 2. All construction equipment, materials, or on-going work shall be separated from the public by use of fencing, barricades, caution ribbon, or other means reasonably approved by the City Engineer/Public Works Director. 3. All site features designed to serve the disabled (i.e. H/C parking stalls, accessible walkways, signage) for the building shall be installed and fully functional. 58. Stormwater Runoff Calculations. PW Prior to Public Applicant/Developer shall provide the stormwater Issuance of Works runoff, conveyance and treatment details. The Grading/Sitew calculations shall demonstrate adequate capacity in ork Permit the existing or proposed storm drainage system. 59. Stormwater Management. PW Prior to Public The applicant shall submit Stormwater Management Issuance of Works Plan for City Engineer's review and approval prior to Building Permit the issuance of Grad ing/Sitework Permit. Approval is subject to the developer providing the necessary plans, details, and calculations that demonstrate the Ian complies with the standards established by the 15 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Municipal Regional Permit (MRP). The applicant shall install "No Dumping Drains To Creek" storm drain markers on all existing catch basins on site per City Std Dwg CD- 704. The Applicant shall install "Triton" Storm Drain Filter in all existing and proposed catch basins. 60. Storm Water Treatment Measures Maintenance PW Prior to Public Agreement. Developer shall enter into an Agreement Issuance of Works with the City of Dublin that guarantees the property Building Permit owner's perpetual maintenance obligation for all stormwater treatment measures installed as part of the project. Said Agreement is required pursuant to Provision C.3 of the Municipal Regional Stormwater NPDES Permit, Order No. R2-2009-0074. Said permit requires the City to provide verification and assurance that all treatment devices will be properly operated and maintained. The Agreement shall be recorded against the property and shall run with the land. 61. Erosion Control During Construction: PW Prior to Public Applicant/Developer shall include an Erosion and Issuance of Works Sediment Control Plan with the Grading and Grading/ Improvement plans for review and approval by the Sitework City Engineer/Public Works Director. Said plan shall Permit and be designed, implemented, and continually during maintained pursuant to the City's NPDES permit construction. between October 1st and April 15th or beyond these dates if dictated by rainy weather, or as otherwise directed by the City Engineer/Public Works Director. 62. Construction Hours. PW During Public Construction and grading operations shall be limited Construction Works to weekdays (Monday through Friday) and non-City holidays between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. The Applicant/Developer may request permission to work on Saturdays and/or holidays between the hours of 8:30 am and 5:00 pm by submitting a request form to the City Engineer no later than 5:00 pm the prior Wednesday. Overtime inspection rates will apply for all Saturday and/or holiday work. 63. Construction Noise Management Plan. PW During Public Developer shall prepare a Construction Noise Construction Works Management Plan, to be approved by the City and Grading Engineer and Community Development Director, that Activities identifies measures to be taken to minimize construction noise on surrounding developed properties. The Plan shall include hours of construction operation, use of mufflers on construction equipment, speed limit for construction traffic, haul routes and identify a noise monitor. 16 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: Specific noise management measures shall be included in the project plans andspecifications. 64. Damage/Repairs. PW Prior to Public The Applicant/Developer shall be responsible for the Occupancy Works repair of any damaged pavement, curb & gutter, sidewalk, or other public street facility resulting from construction activities associated with the develop ment of the project. 65. Lighting. PW Prior to Public Any illumination, including security lighting, shall be Occupancy Works directed away from adjoining properties, businesses or vehicular traffic so as not to cause any glare." 66. Geotechnical Report: The Developer shall submit a PW Prior to Public design level geotechnical investigation report defining Issuance of Works and delineating any seismic hazard. The report shall Grading/ be prepared in accordance with guidelines published Sitework by the State of California. The report is subject to Permit or review and approval by a City selected peer review Building Permit consultant prior to the issuance of Building Permit. The applicant shall pay all costs related to the required peer review. The recommendations of those geotechnical reports shall be incorporated into the project plans subject to the approval of the City En ineer. 67. Geotechnical Engineer Review and Approval. The PW Prior to Public Project Geotechnical Engineer shall be retained to Issuance of Works review all final grading plans and specifications. The Grading/ Project Geotechnical Engineer shall approve all Sitework grading plans prior to City approval and issuance of Permit or grading permits. Building Permit 68. Trash Enclosure. The proposed trash enclosure shall PW Issuance of Public conform to City of Dublin Trash Enclosure Ordinance Building Permit Works 7.98. The concrete apron shall extend a minimum ten feet from the enclosure pad and be the width of the enclosure opening. The enclosure shall have a drain connected to the sanitary sewer. A hose bib shall be available for periodic wash down. The area around and inside the enclosure must be lit with a minimum of one-foot candle. The trash enclosure shall be architecturally designed to be compatible with the building. The doors must be designed with self- closing gates that can be locked closed and can also be held open with pin locks during loading. All trash bins used for this site shall be maintained within the trash bin enclosure(s) at all times. The enclosure shall have accessible route and entrance door DUBLIN SAN RAMON SERVICES DISTRICT DSRSD 69. Prior to issuance of any building permit, complete DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD improvement plans shall be submitted to DSRSD that Building conform to the requirements of the Dublin San Permits Ramon Services District Code, the DSRSD "Standard Procedures, Specifications and Drawings for Design 17 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: and Installation of Water and Wastewater Facilities", all applicable DSRSD Master Plans and all DSRSD policies. 70. Above ground backflow prevention devices/double DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD detector check valves shall be installed on fire Improvement protection systems connected to the DSRSD water Plans main. The Applicant shall collaborate with the Fire Department and with DSRSD to size and configure the fire system to serve the new building appropriately. The Applicant shall minimize the number of backflow prevention devices installed on the system._ 71. Sewers shall be designed to operate by gravity flow to DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD DSRSD's existing sanitary sewer system. Pumping of Improvement sewage is discouraged and may only be allowed Plans under extreme circumstances following a case by case review with DSRSD staff. Any pumping station will require specific review and approval by DSRSD of preliminary design reports, design criteria, and final plans and specifications. The DSRSD reserves the right to require payment of present worth 20 year maintenance costs as well as other conditions within a separate agreement with the applicant for any ro ect that requires a pumping station. 72. Domestic and fire protection waterline systems for DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD Tracts or Commercial Developments shall be Improvement designed to be looped or interconnected to avoid Plans dead end sections in accordance with requirements of the DSRSD Standard Specifications and sound engineering practice. There will be a large number of customers in the project and DSRSD wants to be sure they have a secure water supply. Thus, the water supply must be "looped" with the supply for the project coming from two separate connections to the otable main. 73. DSRSD policy requires public water and sewer lines DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD to be located in public streets rather than in off-street Improvement locations to the fullest extent possible. If unavoidable, Plans then public sewer or water easements must be established over the alignment of each public sewer or water line in an off-street or private street location to provide access for future maintenance and/or re lacement. 74. Prior to approval by the City of a grading permit or a DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD site development permit, the locations and widths of Improvement all proposed easement dedications for water and Plans sewer lines shall be submitted to and approved by DSRSD. 75. All easement dedications for DSRSD facilities shall be DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD by separate instrument irrevocably offered to DSRSD. Improvement Plans 76. Grading for construction shall be done with recycled DSRSD During DSRSD water. construction 18 CONDITION TEXT RESPON. WHEN REQ'D SOURCE AGENCY Prior to: 77. Prior to issuance by the City of any Building Permit or DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD Construction Permit by the Dublin San Ramon Building Services District, whichever comes first, all utility Permits connection fees including DSRSD and Zone 7, plan checking fees, inspection fees, connection fees, and fees associated with a wastewater discharge permit shall be paid to DSRSD in accordance with the rates and schedules established in the DSRSD Code. 78. No sewer line or waterline construction shall be DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD permitted unless the proper utility construction permit Improvement has been issued by DSRSD. A construction permit Plans will only be issued after all of the items in the condition immediately above have been satisfied. 79. Prior to issuance by the City of any Building Permit or DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD Construction Permit by the Dublin San Ramon Building Services District, whichever comes first, all Permits improvement plans for DSRSD facilities shall be signed by the District Engineer. Each drawing of improvement plans shall contain a signature block for the District Engineer indicating approval of the sanitary sewer or water facilities shown. Prior to approval by the District Engineer, the applicant shall pay all required DSRSD fees, and provide an engineer's estimate of construction costs for the sewer and water systems, a performance bond, a one-year maintenance bond, and a comprehensive general liability insurance policy in the amounts and forms that are acceptable to DSRSD. The applicant shall allow at least 15 working days for final improvement drawing review by DSRSD before si nature by the District Engineer. 80. The applicant shall hold DSRSD, its Board of DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD Directors, commissions, employees, and agents of Building DSRSD harmless and indemnify and defend the Permits same from any litigation, claims, or fines resulting from the construction and completion of the project. 81. Improvement plans shall include recycled water DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD improvements as required by DSRSD. Services for Improvement landscape irrigation shall connect to recycled water Plans mains. Applicant must obtain a copy of the DSRSD Recycled Water Use Guidelines and conform to the requirements therein. 82. A utility plan showing routing of improvements and DSRSD Issuance of DSRSD demolition of existing utilities (if any). Zone 7 Turnout Improvement and DSRSD Fluoride Storage Facility shall be shown Plans on final plans. 83. If needed, temporary potable irrigation meters with DSRSD Project DSRSD recycled water service shall only be allowed for cross- completion connection and coverage testing for a maximum of 14 calendar days. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May, 2014. 19 AYES: NOES: ABSTAIN: ABSENT: Planning Commission Chairperson ATTEST: Assistant Community Development Director GAPA#\1999\99-064 Quarry Lane\SDR\RESO.DOC 20 oz � w �¢°�°LL� � Q Z E -- 995ti6 VINHO�II` O NIlenci F tz � w. a $ a Eg € J N x ° GVOH ` HVHVSShc £9£9 w�o=3:56.4 W a W '� o �00HOS 3Nd—I ,&Htjvflo g�gg € ` a o��cO2N a 8 R g5���2&�g$a•U U N � W ho 6. r o f a o * Oki o w N EQ..I I 0 d � 0096 N O "_ _ O o b1 _ �I ° � az Q N p� 0 Q 11 a a W I W Hp O W Z V La Q� < z a3 a p :�my �., Z�LLQ W CL LU d"b� aao o m\nF • O I U c� ❑ +r : = I W w O Z U ( Z II ` :: F U 0 4 Y X 20-o g � Q $ o �(�y w Cc n I F - + �. N T z �' I z r 0 Z x m a Z W \ O OJ f Q z e _ � d xl o Q o n,OZ N > O l a ` co - or / ■ 0 1 I 0 •'—, = n I U G Cm):b. 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M 3 �x f' Lu o � Z . • RESOLUTION NO. 14 - xx A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL ADOPT A CEQA ADDENDUM FOR THE QUARRY LANE SCHOOL PHASE III EXPANSION AT 6363 TASSAJARA ROAD (APN 985-0002-006-03) PLPA-2014-00008 WHEREAS, the Applicant, Dr. Sabri Arac, Quarry Lane School, has requested approval of Site Development Review and amendments to the Development Plan for the existing Planned Development District (Ord. 24-00) to allow for 17,102 square feet of additional building area on the school site, consisting of one new building of 13,102 square feet, and the potential to add up to 4,000 square feet to existing Building One at some point in the future. The total building area would be 110,602 square feet, which would also include the square footage of Building 1 (7,611 square feet), which was an existing building on an adjacent lot that was purchased by the School in 1997 and made a part of the school campus. The added total building area is referred to herein as the "Project"; and WHEREAS, a complete application for the Project is available and on file in the Dublin Planning Department; and WHEREAS, environmental review for the Project area was previously conducted and documented in the certified EIR for the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan, which was adopted in 1993 (SCH No. 91(-103064) and in the certified EIR for the Quarry Lane Master Plan, which was adopted in 1998 by the County of Alameda (SCH No. 97122109); and WHEREAS, in 2000, the City of Dublin approved a Planned Development District Stage 1/2 Development Plan for the construction of Phase II of Quarry Lane School, and adopted a Mitigated Negative Declaration (City Council Resolution 204-00, incorporated herein by reference); and WHEREAS, in 2004, the Planning Commission approved Site Development Review, a Conditional Use Permit, and adopted a CEQA Addendum to allow the construction of Phase II of Quarry Lane School and the associated minor amendments to the approved Development Plan (PC Resolution 04-46, incorporated herein by reference); and WHEREAS, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15162, the City of Dublin prepared an Initial Study to determine if additional environmental review was required for the Project beyond the prior EIRs and Mitigated Negative Declaration. The Initial Study determined that the project would not require major revisions to the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration because the Project would not have new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects. Because the overall site building envelope, amount of urbanized area, and student and staff population were unchanged, the impacts and appropriate mitigations are the same and no new mitigations are required. Furthermore, the Initial Study determined that there was no change in circumstances that would result in new significant environmental effects or a substantial increase in the severity of previously identified significant effects because no new or unanticipated ATTACHMENT 5 circumstances have developed since the previous EIRs were certified, the previous Mitigated Negative Declaration was adopted, and the previous Addendum was adopted; and WHEREAS, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15164 and based on the Initial Study, dated April 28, 2014, the City prepared an Addendum to the prior CEQA documents. The Addendum with its supporting Initial Study are attached to this Resolution as Exhibit A, which is incorporated herein by reference and which describes the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion and its relation to the analysis in the previous environmental documents; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report, dated May 13, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, described and analyzed the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion, including the Site Development Review application and the proposed Planned Development Rezoning/Development Plan amendment, for the Planning Commission; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a properly noticed public hearing on the Project, including the proposed Site Development Review application and the proposed Planned Development Rezoning/Development Plan amendment, on May 13, 2014, at which time all interested parties had the opportunity to be heard; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission considered the CEQA Addendum, all above- referenced reports, recommendations, and testimony to evaluate the Project. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Planning Commission has reviewed and considered the Addendum dated April 28, 2014 (Exhibit A) prior to making a recommendation on the Project. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Planning Commission recommends that the City Council adopt a Resolution adopting the attached Addendum to the previous environmental documents for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: Planning Commission Chairperson ATTEST: 2 Assistant Community Development Director G:IPAM20141PLPA-2014-00008 Quarry Lane SDR, PD Amendment105.13.2014 PC Mtgl4tt 5-PC CEQA Reso.doc 3 Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion (2014) Addendum and Initial Study City of Dublin April 28, 2014 ADDENDUM PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project consists of the following components: 1. Construction of a new two story, 13,102 square foot cafeteria and science building behind the existing office/library/administration building(Building One); z. Documenting the addition of the existing Building 1 to the Quarry Lane School campus. The building was acquired by the school in 1997 but the square footage was never reflected in the adopted Development Plan; 3. Documenting a potential future expansion area for Building One by 4,000 square feet for the purposes of creating a performing arts stage; and 4. Construction of retaining walls, site grading, and other related site improvements on the school site to accommodate the new building area, including the removal of seven trees (four eucalyptus, two redwood, and one Mexican fan palm). In order to accommodate the total 17,102 square feet of additional building area and associated site improvements, the following approvals are being sought: 1. Site Development Review for site and architectural approval of the 13,102 square foot cafeteria and science building; 2. Planned Development Rezoning/Development Plan Amendment to increase the allowable development on the project site from 85,889 square feet (as noted in the existing Development Plan)to 110,602 square feet. The added square footage is comprised of the following: Table 1: Project Description Square Status Description Feet Phase 1 15,60o Existing Allowed per Development Plan (2000) Phase 11 70,289 Existing Allowed per amended Development Plan (z000) Subtotal 85,889 Total allowed per Development Plan (2004) Existing building purchased by Quarry Lane and added to school Building 1 7,611 Existing campus Subtotal 7,611 Additional development existing on-site (2014) New Cafeteria/ Proposed Development Plan Amendment Science Building 13,102 Proposed and Site Development Review(SDR) Building 1:future 4,000 Proposed Proposed Development Plan Amendment-no SDR addition � Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project LAMM I A ATTACHMENT 5 Square Status 76_es cription Feet Subtotal 17,102 Total Additional Development proposed on site TOTAL lto,602 Proposed Development Plan Amendment The location of the new cafeteria/science building is shown in Figure 1 (Project Site Plan), which is attached. PRIOR CEQA ANALYSIS: The project site was previously reviewed for annexation and development as part of the Eastern Dublin EIR (SCH 91103604) prepared for the Eastern Dublin General Plan Amendment and Specific Plan project. The Quarry Lane School site was not annexed at this time and the property continued to remain in unincorporated Alameda County. The Eastern Dublin EIR was certified by the City Council on May io, 1993 via Resolution 51-93, incorporated herein by reference. Numerous mitigation measures were adopted, and continue to apply to the Quarry Lane School project and project site as appropriate. Significant unavoidable impacts were also identified; therefore, the City Council adopted a Statement of Overriding Considerations upon approval of the Eastern Dublin project (Resolution 53-93)• In April 1999, Alameda County approved the first phase of the Quarry Lane School, consisting of a 15,600- square -foot building for day care, preschool and elementary school grades with a maximum of zoo students. An Environmental Impact Report (Quarry Lane School, Environmental Impact Report, the 2o6o1n Zoning Unit, August 1998, SCH #97122109, incorporated herein by reference) was certified by the County prior to approving the Phase I project. The EIR included an analysis of the full build out of the school, consisting of 62,575 square feet of floor area for day care, preschool, elementary, middle and high school grades with a maximum of 950 students and 55 faculty and staff members. On December 19, 2000, the City of Dublin City Council approved a Planned Development District Pre-zoning and Annexation application for Phase 2 of the Quarry Lane School. The use, student population, building envelope, site layout, extent of grading, and construction were studied as part of the application. The total project size increased from the 62,575 square feet studied in the Alameda County Quarry Lane EIR to 82,263 square feet, but the student population did not change. An Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared for the Phase 2 project that considered the following environmental factors: aesthetics; biological resources; public services; utilities/service systems; cultural resources; hydrology/water quality; noise; air quality; geology/soils; and transportation/circulation. The adopted Mitigated Negative Declaration determined that these impacts were less than significant with the mitigations incorporated into the project via City Council Resolution 204-0o, December 5, 2000, incorporated herein by reference. On May 25, 2004, the Planning Commission approved a Site Development Review application and minor amendments to the approved Stage 2 Development Plan that included a 3,604 square foot increase to the overall project building size (a total of 70,289 square feet), a minor amendment to the number of parking spaces (reduction to 149 total spaces required), and allowances for an additional retaining wall on site. With this amendment to Phase ll, an Addendum to the EIRs and Mitigated Negative Declaration was prepared that determined the changes to the Phase II project would not require major revisions to the previous EIRs or Mitigated Negative Declaration. The Addendum was approved by the Planning Commission via Resolution 04-46, incorporated herein by reference. Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project CURRENT CEQA ANALYSIS AND _DETERMINATION THAT AN ADDENDUM IS APPROPRIATE_ FOR THIS PROJECT: In order to determine if there were any significant environmental impacts that were present with the Project that were not already addressed (and mitigated if necessary) in the previous environmental documents, an Initial Study was completed. The Initial Study, dated April 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference, determined that the potentially significant effects of the Project were adequately addressed in the Eastern Dublin EIR, the Alameda County Quarry Lane EIR, and the 2004 Quarry Lane School Phase II Mitigated Negative Declaration, and that no substantial changes have been proposed with the current Project or the conditions under which the Project will be undertaken which require revisions of the previous environmental documents. Based on the Initial Study, this Addendum has been prepared, which notes the difference in the Quarry Lane School Phase III project and the previous project approvals which CEQA impacts were addressed in the previously-certified EIRs and adopted MND. The Proposed Development Plan Amendment (Phase III expansion) compares to the Existing Development Plan (Phase II expansion and previous project approvals) as follows: Table z: Existing and Proposed Development Plans Approved Proposed Project Component Development Plan Development Plan Difference (Phase II: 2004) (Phase III: 2014) Student Population 950 950 None Faculty and Staff 55 55 None Classrooms 51 51 None Increase of 24,713 SF Total Building Area 85,889 SF 11o,602 (7,611 SF Existing Bldg. One added to (Square Feet) campus +13,1o2 New Bldg. +4,000 SF Bldg. One future expansion area) Floor to Area Ratio .219 (maximum) .253 Increase of.034 Parking Spaces 149 spaces 149 spaces None Max. Bldg. Height 59 feet 59 feet None The addition of 7,611 square feet in Building 1 to the Total Building Area is a result of the school's acquisition of the building and site, which existed on a separate parcel and served as a special events center ("Villa Tassajara") for many years. In 1997, Quarry Lane School acquired the site and parcel and incorporated the building into the school campus, utilizing the building for administrative purposes, library, and kitchen functions. This is not newly-constructed building area, but it is building area that had not been previously accounted for in the Quarry Lane School Development Plan, although it was referenced in the 2000 Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration. 3T___ Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Although the proposed project allows for a new 13,102 square foot building to be constructed on site and allows for a future expansion to Building One by up to 4,000 square feet to allow for the addition of a performing arts area within the building, those factors which could intensify the use at the site - including the total number of students enrolled at the school and the number of faculty/staff members - is not increasing. Therefore, even with the construction of a facility such as the new cafeteria and science building and the future potential for an addition to Building One, the same maximum number of students are going to be served at the school site by the same maximum number of faculty and staff members, so the overall intensity of activity at the site remains the same as before the Phase I II expansion. NO SUBSEQUENT REVIEW IS REQUIRED PER CEQA GUIDELINES SECTION 15162: Pursuant to Section 15162 of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines, no subsequent environmental analysis shall be prepared for the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project, as no substantial changes have been proposed with the Project or the conditions under which the Project will be undertaken which require revisions to the previous environmental documents. No new significant environmental impacts have been identified and no substantial increase in the severity of previously identified impacts has been discovered. Pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15164, with minor technical amendments and clarifications as outlined in this Addendum, the previous environmental documents will continue to adequately address the significant environmental impacts of the Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project. CONCLUSION: The City prepared an Initial Study in connection with the Project; based on the Initial Study, the City prepared an Addendum to the previous CEQA documents. As provided in Section 15164, the Addendum need not be circulated for public review, but shall be considered with the previous environmental documents before making a decision on the proposed project. The Initial Study is included below and the previous environmental documents are available for review in the Community Development Department at the City of Dublin, loo Civic Plaza, Dublin, California. E Initial StudyiAddendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project INITIAL STUDY This Initial Study has been prepared in accord with the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and CEQA Guidelines. It assesses the potential environmental impacts of implementing the proposed project described below and whether those impacts are adequately addressed in prior environmental reviews for the site. The Initial Study consists of a completed environmental checklist and a brief explanation of the environmental topics addressed in the checklist. Project Title Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Lead Agency Name and Address City of Dublin loo Civic Plaza Dublin, CA 94568 Contact Person and Phone Number Kristi Bascom Principal Planner (925) 833-6610 Project Location The project site is approximately ten acres of land located on the east side of Tassajara Road approximately 1.75 miles north of I- 580. The project location is shown below in the figure to the right. C1ull'y ne- - The adjacent property to the north is - — - currently a single-family home and ranch that will soon be demolished and redeveloped with a 36-unit subdivision approved in 201o. The adjacent property to the south is a single-family home, landscape contracting business, and landscape nursery. Project Applicant's/Sponsor's Name and Address Dr. Sabri Arac, President, Quarry Lane School 6363 Tassajara Road Dublin, CA 94568 General Plan Designations Medium Density Residential (6.1-14 units/acre) Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase Ill expansion project Zoning Current: Planned Development Zoning District (PA 99-064) Proposed: Planned Development Zoning District (PLPA-2014-0008) Project Description Background The adjacent property to the north is currently a single-family home and ranch that will soon be demolished and redeveloped with a 36-unit subdivision approved in 2010. The adjacent property to the south is designated Medium Density Residential (6.1 to 14 units per acre) and is currently occupied by a single-family home, landscape contracting business, and landscape nursery. In April 1999, prior to the site being annexed to the City of Dublin, Alameda County approved a Planned Development District to allow the development of the first phase of the Quarry Lane School, consisting of a 15,600-square-foot building for day care, preschool and elementary school grades with a maximum enrollment of zoo students. A programmatic Environmental Impact Report was certified by the County at that time for the Quarry Lane School Master Plan. On December 19, 2000, the City Council approved the Planned Development (PD) District Pre-zoning and Annexation application for Quarry Lane School Phase II (City Council Ordinance 24-00 —Attachment 1). The application was for a substantial increase to the amount of development on site to allow an additional 66,685 square feet to construct a middle school and high school building, recreation areas, landscaping and grading. This would allow Quarry Lane to expand from zoo students (daycare, preschool, and elementary school) to a population of 950 students that would include middle school and high school ages as well. The school use, maximum student population, ultimate building envelope, site layout, extent of grading, and architectural plans were approved by the City at this time. On May 25, 2004, the Planning Commission approved Resolution 04-46 (Attachment 2), which included a minor amendment to the Stage 2 Development Plan and Site Development Review. The application requested Site Development Review to construct Phase II, which included construction of 70,289 square feet of new building area (an increase from the 66,685 square feet approved in z000) and associated sports fields and playground areas to serve the middle and high school facilities. The project also included other minor site revisions. While the building area increased, the total maximum student population remained at 950 students. Proposed Project The Phase III expansion of Quarry Lane School includes Site Development Review and amendments to the Development Plan for the existing Planned Development District (Ord. 24-00) to allow for 17,102 square feet of additional building area on the school site, consisting of one new building of 13,102 square feet, and the potential to add up to 4,000 square feet to existing Building One at some point in the future. The total building area would be 110,602 square feet, which would also include the square footage of Building 1 (7,611 square feet), which was an existing building on an adjacent lot that was purchased by the School in 1997 and made a part of the school campus. The current proposal is to increase the amount of development permitted on site from 85,889 square feet (per the 2004 Stage 2 Development Plan approval) to 110,602 square feet and to increase the allowable Floor to Area Ratio (FAR) from .209 to .253. Table 1 below describes the factors in the proposed increase. Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase I II expansion project r Table 1: Project Description Square Status Description Feet Phase 1 15,60o Existing Allowed per Development Plan (2000 Phase II 70,289 Existing Allowed per amended Development Plan (2004) Subtotal 85,889 Total allowed per Development Plan (2004) Existing building purchased by Quarry Lane and added to school campus (but never added to the Stage 2 Building 1 7,611 Existing Development Plan total) Subtotal 7,611 Additional development existing on-site (2014) New Cafeteria/ Proposed Stage 2 Development Plan Amendment and Site Science Building 13,102 Proposed Development Review(SDR) Building 1: future addition 4,000 Proposed Proposed Development Plan Amendment- no SDR Subtotal 17,102 Total Additional Development proposed on site TOTAL 110,602 Proposed Stage 2 Development Plan Amendment Proposed Planned Development Rezoning and related Stage 1/2 Development Plan Amendments: The proposed changes to the Stage 1/2 Development Plan are to: 1) Increase the amount of development permitted on site from 85,889 square feet (per the 2004 Stage 2 Development Plan approval) to 110,602 square feet; and 2) Increase the allowable Floor to Area Ratio (FAR)from .219 to .253• All other standards of the Stage 1/2 Development Plan remain the same. Site Development Review approval for the new cafeteria/science building is also a part of the requested entitlements. Other public agencies whose approval is required Grading and Building permits (City of Dublin) Sewer and water connections (DSRSD) Encroachment permits (City of Dublin) Notice of Intent (State Water Resources Control Board) 7 Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project III. Environmental Checklist Environmental Factors Potentially Affected by the Project The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this project, involving as indicated by the checklist on the following pages. Aesthetics Agricultural Resources Air Quality Biological Resources Cultural Resources Geology/ Soils Hazards & Hazardous Hydrology/Water Land Use / Planning Materials Quality Mineral Resources Noise Population / Housing Public Services Recreation Transportation / Traffic Utilities / Service Mandatory Findings of Significance Systems Instructions ! . A brief explanation is required for all answers except "No Impact" answers that are adequately supported by the information sources a lead agency cites in the parentheses following each question (see Attachment A: Source List). A "No Impact" answer is adequately supported if the referenced information sources show that the impact simply does not apply to projects like the one involved (e.g., the project falls outside a fault rupture zone). A "No Impact" answer should be explained where it is based on project-specific factors as well as general standards (e.g., the project will not expose sensitive receptors to pollutants, based on a project-specific screening analysis). All answers must take account of the whole action involved, including off-site as well as on-site, cumulative as well as project-level, indirect as well as direct, and construction as well as operational impacts. >. Once the lead agency has determined that a particular physical impact may occur, then the checklist answers must indicate whether the impact is potentially significant, less than significant with mitigation, or less than significant. "Potentially Significant Impact" is appropriate if there is substantial evidence that any effect may be significant. If there are one or more "Potentially Significant Impact" entries when the determination is made, an EIR is required. 4. "Negative Declaration: Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: applies where incorporation of mitigation measures has reduced an effect from "Potentially Significant Impact" to a "Less Than Significant Impact."The lead agency must describe the mitigation measures, and briefly explain how they reduce the effect to a less than significant level. Earlier Analysis may be used where, pursuant to the tiering, Program EIR, or other CEQA process, one or more effects have been adequately analyzed in an earlier EIR or negative declaration. Section 15o63(c)(3)(D). In this case, the checklist entry will be "No New Impact" and a discussion should identify the following on attached sheets: d Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project a. Earlier analysis used. Identify earlier analyses and state where they are available for review. b. Impacts adequately addressed. Identify which effects from the above checklist were within the scope of and adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal standards, and state whether such effects were addressed by mitigation measures based on the earlier analysis. f; Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase I II expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant /No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): �. AESTHETICS. Would the project: a) Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic vista? X b) Substantially damage scenic resources, including but not limited to trees, rock outcroppings, and X historic buildings within a state scenic highway? c) Substantially degrade the existing visual character X or quality of the site and its surroundings? d) Create a new source of substantial light or glare, which would adversely affect day or nighttime X views in the area? Discussion The school campus is currently occupied by 93,5oo square feet of educational buildings, parking areas, recreational fields, and other facilities appropriate to a school and therefore the visual character of the site has already been determined. The proposed new two-story building(13,302 square feet)will be located behind an existing two story building and will have limited visibility from Tassajara Road. The future expansion area to Building 1 will be aesthetically complementary to the existing campus and within the development standards already specific in the Stage 1/2 Development Plan. No more substantial light or glare impacts will be created as a result of the new building or the future expansion area. The Quarry Lane M N D (2000) contained several mitigation measures that will continue to apply to the project site, including: The Quarry Lane Phase III expansion project would not have any impacts on aesthetics/visual resources beyond those already analyzed in the previous environmental documents, and therefore no new impacts would result. z. AGRICULTURE RESOURCES AND FORESTRY RESOURCES. In determining whether impacts to agricultural resources are significant environmental effects, lead agencies may refer to the California Agricultural Land Evaluation and Site Assessment Model (1997) prepared by the California Department of Conservation as an optional model to use in assessing impacts on agriculture and farmland. In determining whether impacts to forest resources, including timberland, are significant environmental effects, lead agencies may refer to information compiled by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection regarding the state's inventory of forest land, including the Forest and Range Assessment Project and the Forest Legacy Assessment project; and forest carbon measurement methodology provided in Forest Protocols adopted by the California Air Resources Board. Would the project: a) Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or X Farmland of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as o Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): shown on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program of the California Resources Agency, to non-agricultural use? b) Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural use, or X a Williamson Act contract? c) Conflict with existing zoning for, or cause rezoning of forest land (as defined in Public Resources Code Section 12220(g)), timberland (as defined by Public X Resources Code section 4526) or timberland zoned Timberland Production (as defined by Government Code section 51104(g))? d) Result in loss of forest land or conversion of forest X land to non-forest uses? e) Involve other changes in the existing environment, which due to their location or nature, could result in X conversion of Farmland to non-agricultural use or conversion of forest land to non-forest use? Discussion The project area has already been developed and there are no agricultural or forestry present, no agricultural zoning or Williamson Act land, and therefore there would be no new impact. 3. AIR QUALITY. Where available,the significance criteria established by the applicable air quality management or air pollution control district may be relied upon to make the following determinations. Would the project: a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the X applicable air quality plan? b) Violate any air quality standard or contribute to an X existing or projected air quality violation? c) Result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of any criteria pollutant for which the project region is non-attainment under an applicable federal or state X ambient air quality standard (including releasing emissions, which exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone precursors)? d) Expose sensitive receptors to substantial pollutant X concentrations? e) Create objectionable odors affecting a substantial X si Initial Study�Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): number of people? Discussion The proposed}project does not increase the maximum student population able to be accommodated on site nor does it allow for an increase in the number of faculty and staff at the school. Therefore, the vehicular trips to and from the school site will not increase beyond that which was previously assumed and the air quality impacts normally attributed to vehicular emissions would not be increased. Since the maximum student population is not increasing, the number of potentially sensitive receptors is not increasing either. The school campus will not create objectionable odors. The Quarry Lane Phase III expansion project would not have any impacts on air quality beyond those already analyzed in the previous environmental documents, and therefore no new impacts would result. 4. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES. Would the project: a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either directly or through habitat modifications, on any species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or special-status X species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations, or by the California Department of Fish and Game or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, X regulations or by the California Department of Fish and Game or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? c) Have a substantial adverse effect on federally protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (including, but not limited to, X marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or other means? d) Interfere substantially with the movement of any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife species or with established native resident or migratory X wildlife corridors, or impede the use of native wildlife nursery sites? e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree X preservation policy or ordinance? Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community X Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan? Discussion The school campus is currently occupied by 93,5oo square feet of educational buildings, parking areas, recreational fields, and other facilities appropriate to a school. The location of the proposed new cafeteria and science building is currently occupied by a storage shed, outdoor eating area for students, and a commercial grade walk-in refrigerator. Therefore, there are no biological resources present on the project site near the proposed expansion areas. There are seven trees that are proposed to be removed from the project site, including four eucalyptus, two redwoods (with trunk diameters of io inches and 12 inches) and one Mexican fan palm tree. These trees are located in areas that are to receive extensive grading. All other landscaping is to remain on site, and the newly-created slope areas are to be planted with groundcover. The Quarry Lane Phase III expansion project would not have any impacts on biological resources beyond those already analyzed in the previous environmental documents, and therefore no new impacts would result. 5. CULTURAL RESOURCES. Would the project: a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource as defined in X CEQA Guidelines section 15o64.5? b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant x to section 15o64.5? c) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic X feature? d) Disturb any human remains, including those X interred outside of formal cemeteries? Discussion The school campus is currently occupied by 93,5oo square feet of educational buildings, parking areas, recreational fields, and other facilities appropriate to a school. The location of the proposed new cafeteria and science building is currently occupied by a storage shed, outdoor eating area for students, and a commercial grade walk-in refrigerator. No historic resources exist on site. While the likelihood of finding archaeological and/or cultural resources on the project site in the 13 Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): location of the future buildings is low, in the event that such resources are encountered, mitigation Measure 3.9/5•o and 6.o contained in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan EIR establishes procedures to be activated in the event archeological resources are encountered during grading. The Quarry Lane Phase I I I expansion project would not have any impacts on cultural resources beyond those already analyzed in the previous environmental documents, and therefore no new impacts would result. 6. GEOLOGY AND SOILS. Would the project expose people or structures to potential substantial adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving: a) Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as delineated on the most recent Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Map issued by the State Geologist for the X area or based on other substantial evidence of a known fault? Refer to Division of Mines and Geology Special Publication 42? b) Strong seismic ground shaking? X c) Seismic-related ground failure, including X liquefaction? d) Landslides? X e) Result in substantial soil erosion or the loss of X topsoil? f) Be located on a geologic unit or soil that is unstable, or that would become unstable as a result of the project, and potentially result in on- or off-site X landslide, lateral spreading, subsidence, liquefaction or collapse? g) Be located on expansive soil, as defined in Table 18- 1-B of the Uniform Building Code (1994), creating X substantial risks to life or property? h) Have soils incapable of adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or alternative wastewater X disposal systems where sewers are not available for the disposal of wastewater. Discussion Since the site is not located within an Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Safety Zone, the potential for ground rupture is anticipated to be minimal. Adherence to Mitigation Measures MM 3.6/i.o through 8.o contained in the Eastern Dublin EIR will ensure that new structures built on the site will comply with generally recognized seismic safety standards so that ground shaking impacts would be � Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant /No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): reduced. The previous environmental documents include a number of mitigation measures to deal with geologic impacts, including the requirement for a soils report prior to issuance of building permits, completion of a geotechnical report for the site, identifying appropriate construction methods and techniques consistent with generally recognized engineering principles; Review of the final grading plan by a geotechnical engineer; and Identification of specific methods to minimize risk of landslides and expansive soils as part of the geotechnical report. Construction of any future buildings on the project site will need to comply with these requirements. The Quarry Lane Phase III expansion project would not have any impacts on geology and soils beyond those already analyzed in the previous environmental documents, and therefore no new impacts would result. 7. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS. Would the project: a) Generate greenhouse gas emissions, either directly or indirectly, that may have a significant impact on X the environment? b) Conflict with an applicable plan, policy or regulation adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions X of greenhouse gases? Discussion Impacts related to Greenhouse Gas Emissions were not analyzed in any of the prior environmental documents. However, the proposed project does not increase the maximum student population able to be accommodated on site nor does it allow for an increase in the number of faculty and staff at the school. Therefore, the vehicular trips to and from the school site will not increase and the vehicular emissions generated will not increase. 8. HAZARDS AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Would the project: a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transport, use, or X disposal of hazardous materials? b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably foreseeable upset X and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous materials into the environment? c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or waste X within X mile of an existing or proposed school? d Be located on a site which is included on a list of X 15 Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project I Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would it create a significant hazard to the public or the environment? (V.13) e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, X would the project result in a safety hazard for people residing or working in the project area? f) For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project result in a safety hazard for X people residing or working in the project area? g) Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an adopted emergency response plan or X emergency evacuation plan? h) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving wildland fires, including where wildlands are adjacent to urbanized X areas or where residences are intermixed with wildlands? Discussion The new science building will contain small amounts of chemicals for the purposes of middle and high school level appropriate science experiments. The amount of chemicals allowed to be stored on site is regulated by the Fire Prevention Division of the City of Dublin. There is no potential impact from the limited nature and use of these chemicals. The project area is not located within an airport land use planning area nor near a private airstrip. It will not create a hazard for the public, impair the execution of any emergency response plans, nor will it increase the risk of wildland fires. Therefore, there is no potential impact from the Project. The Quarry Lane Phase I I I expansion project would not have any impacts on hazards and hazardous materials . 9. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY. Would the project: a) Violate any water quality standards or waste X discharge requirements? b) Substantially deplete groundwater supplies or interfere substantially with groundwater recharge X such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer volume or a lowering of the local ground water :� ( Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts issues(and Supporting Information Sources): table level (for example, the production rate of pre- existing nearby wells would drop to a level which would not support existing land uses or planned uses for which permits have been granted)? c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or river, in a manner, which X would result in substantial erosion or siltation on-or off-site. d) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern of the site or area, including through the alteration of the course of a stream or river, or substantially X increase the rate or amount of surface runoff in a manner, which would result in flooding on-or off- site. e) Create or contribute runoff water which would exceed the capacity of existing or planned storm X water drainage systems or provide substantial additional sources of polluted runoff? f) Otherwise substantially degrade water quality? X g) Place housing within a loo-year flood-hazard area as mapped on a federal Flood Hazard Boundary or X Flood Insurance Rate Map or other flood hazard delineation map? h) Place within a loo-year flood-hazard area structures, X which would impede or redirect flood flows? i) Expose people or structures to a significant risk of loss, injury or death involving flooding, including X flooding as a result of the failure of a levee or dam? j) Inundation by seiche, tsunami, or mudflow? X Discussion The school campus is currently occupied by 93,5oo square feet of educational buildings, parking areas, recreational fields, and other facilities appropriate to a school and therefore is considered a developed site. All future construction will need to comply with the requirements of the Regional Water Quality Control Board as well as all City of Dublin stormwater treatment and water quality requirements. No new impacts to hydrology and water quality will result from the implementation of the project that have not already been addressed in previous environmental documents. �� Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): io. LAND USE AND PLANNING. Would the project: a) Physically divide an established community? X b) Conflict with any applicable land use plan, policy, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction over the project (including, but not limited to the general X plan, specific plan, local coastal program, or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect? c) Conflict with any applicable Habitat Conservation X Plan or Natural Community Conservation Plan? Discussion The proposed project is in conformance with the General Plan and Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. There is no adopted Habitat Conservation-or{Natural Community C-onservation Plan for the site. No new impacts to land use and planning will result from the implementation of the project that have not already been addressed in previous environmental documents. ii. MINERAL RESOURCES. Would the project: a) Result in the loss of availability of a known mineral resource that would be of value to the region and X the residents of the state? b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally important mineral resource recovery site delineated X on a local general plan, specific plan, or other land use plan? Discussion There are no known mineral resources within the City of Dublin or designated in the General Plan or other land use plan, and therefore there would be no impact. 12. NOISE. Would the project result in: a) Exposure of persons to or generation of noise levels in excess of standards established in the local X general plan or noise ordinance or applicable standards of other agencies? b) Exposure of persons to or generation of excessive ground borne vibration or ground borne noise X levels? c) Substantial permanent increase in ambient noise X levels in the project vicinity above levels existing � � Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): without the project? d) A substantial temporary or periodic increase in ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above X levels existing without the project? e) For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted, within two miles of a public airport or public use airport, X would the project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise levels? f) For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, would the project expose people residing or working in the project area to excessive noise X levels? Discussion The expansion of the school campus will not result in new noise impacts because the maximum student population is remaining the same, and therefore no new noise sources will be created on site. Temporary noise impacts due to construction on site have been analyzed and mitigated in the existing environmental documents and related mitigations will apply to the Project. No new impacts to noise will result from the implementation of the project that have not already been addressed in previous environmental documents. 13. POPULATION AND HOUSING. Would the project: a) Induce substantial population growth in an area, either directly (for example, by proposing new X homes and businesses) or indirectly (for example, through extension of roads or other infrastructure)? b) Displace substantial numbers of existing housing, necessitating the construction of replacement X housing elsewhere? c) Displace substantial numbers of people, necessitating the construction of replacement X housing elsewhere? Discussion The proposed project will not add new population to the area nor will it displace any housing, therefore no new impacts will result. 14. PUBLIC SERVICES. Would the project result in substantial adverse physical impacts associated 3g Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): with the provision of new or physically altered governmental facilities or need for new or physical altered governmental facilities,the construction of which could cause significant environmental impacts, in order to maintain acceptable service ratios, response times, or other performance objectives for any of the public services: a) Fire protection? X b) Police protection? X c) Schools? X d) Parks? X e) Other public facilities? X Discussion New construction projects are required to comply with applicable building, safety, and fire codes, fund on- and off-site improvements, and contribute to the City's public facilities fees commensurate with the type, size and scope of the project. There will be no new impacts resulting from the proposed project that are different than those analyzed in the previous environmental documents. 15. RECREATION. Would the project: a) Increase the use of existing neighborhood and regional parks or other recreational facilities such X that substantial physical deterioration of the facility would occur or be accelerated? b) Include recreational facilities or require the construction or expansion of recreational facilities X which might have an adverse physical effect on the environment? Discussion The proposed project will not result in the increased use of existing public recreation facilities, nor cause the need for new facilities, therefore no new impacts will result. 16. TRANSPORTATION/TRAFFIC. Would the project: a) Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance, or policy establishing measures of effectiveness for the performance of the circulation system, taking into account all modes of transportation including mass transit and non-motorized travel and relevant X components of the circulation system, including but not limited to intersections, streets, highways and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths, and mass transit? Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): b) Conflict with an applicable congestion management program, including, but not limited to level of service standards and travel demand measures, or X other standards established by the county congestion management agency for designated roads or highways? c) Result in a change in air traffic patterns, including either an increase in traffic levels or a change in X location that result in substantial safety risks? d) Substantially increase hazards due to a design feature (for example, sharp curves or dangerous X intersections) or incompatible uses (for example, farm equipment)? e) Result in inadequate emergency access? X f) Conflict with adopted policies, plans, or programs supporting regarding public transit, bicycle, or X pedestrian facilities, or otherwise decrease the performance or safety of such facilities? Discussion The proposed project does not change the emergency access routes to the site, change any circulation features of the project site, or impact any transportation facilities serving the area. The proposed project does not increase the maximum student population able to be accommodated on site nor does it allow for an increase in the number of faculty and staff at the school. Therefore, the vehicular trips to and from the school site will not increase beyond that which was previously assumed and therefore no new impacts to transportation would result. 16. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS. Would the project: a) Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the X applicable Regional Water Quality Control Board? b) Require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or expansion of X existing facilities, the construction or which could cause significant environmental effects? c) Require or result in the construction of new storm water drainage facilities or expansion of existing X facilities, the construction of which could cause significant environmental effects d) Have sufficient water supplies available to serve the X z: Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant /No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): project from existing entitlements and resources, or are new or expanded entitlements needed? e) Result in a determination by the wastewater treatment provider, which serves or may serve the project that it has adequate capacity to serve the X project projected demand in addition to the provider's existing commitments? f) Be served by a landfill with sufficient permitted capacity to accommodate the project's solid waste X disposal needs? g) Comply with federal, state, and local statutes and X regulations related to solid waste? Discussion No new or expanded utility systems would be required and there would be adequate capacity with existing infrastructure. Additionally, new construction is required to contribute to the City's impact fees to fund public service infrastructure commensurate with the type, size, and scope of the new construction. The Dublin San Ramon Services District (water and sewer provider) has provided its standard conditions of approval for the proposed project . No new impacts to utilities and service systems will result from implementation of the proposed project. 17. MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE. Does the project: a) Have the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife population to drop below self-sustaining levels, threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community, X reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or endangered plant or animal or eliminate important examples of the major periods of California history or prehistory? b) Have impacts that are individually limited, but cumulatively considerable? ("Cumulatively considerable" means that the incremental effects of a project are considerable when viewed in X connection with the effects of the past projects, the effects of other current projects, and the effects of probable future projects.) c) Have environmental effects, which will cause X substantial adverse effects on human beings, either Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project Potentially Significant Potentially Unless Less Than No Impact Significant Mitigation Significant No New ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Issues Incorpor. Impact Impacts Issues(and Supporting Information Sources): directly or indirectly? Discussion (a-b) The project area is a developed site. The project area contains buildings, parking lots, and recreational facilities, and there is no natural habitat for fish or wildlife species. Because the site is already developed, there would be no new impacts to sensitive plant and animal species, riparian habitat, and federally protected wetlands, and/or archaeological resources. Future development within the project area will not have the potential to degrade the quality of the environment, substantially reduce habitat or eliminate habitat for fish and wildlife species below self-sustaining levels, and/or eliminate important examples of California history or pre-history. (c) As described throughout this environmental checklist, the proposed project would not result in substantial environmental effects on human beings either directly or indirectly and therefore there would be no new impacts. z3 Initial Study/Addendum for Quarry Lane School Phase III expansion project 1� I ♦.Y9' ♦A♦ fff ��A�. ►�ei� �. I I � . f ' F - 1111111111�9t►�t►�.�t1�t/� Y Yi � s...�.... .;.• �e�.� IIIIIIIIIIP��i�O��ii� �y Y ��► ��.�t►�.��►� ``e��.�j+i���l� nnmuiinumn illlliiiill.���►�i�t►� � �• IIIIIIIIII��►�i�i►i�i'1� �_ ' i �� I IUllllllll���i��i�d�. 3• i' _ I- Gi►i 00 �- 221� `, ��....-t._�t.�!����i!i}.IIIIIIIIIIIIIII�IIIIIIIIIIIIIII�I \• 1 1 OF DU��ti 1 M X82 STAFF REPORT PLANNING COMMISSION DATE: May 13, 2014 TO: Planning Commission SUBJECT: Update to the Housing Element of the General Plan (PLPA-2013-00031) Prepared by, Mamie R. Delgado, Senior Planner EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The State of California requires that the City Council adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City. The Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community. State law requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified no later than January 31, 2015. The City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff with the update to the City's Housing Element. The purpose of the meeting is to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and solicit feedback from the Planning Commission and interested parties. RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that the Planning Commission, 1) Receive Staff's presentation, 2) Receive comments from the public, and 3) Adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. recto Submitted By e ' ed By Senior Planner Assistant Community Development Director COPIES TO: File n ITEM NO.: +I' Page 1 of 6 DESCRIPTION: The State of California requires that the City Council adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City. The Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community. State law requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified by January 31, 2015. Having a certified Housing Element is not only required by State law but also enables the City to be more competitive for grant funding. Several housing, community development and infrastructure funding programs include housing element compliance as a rating and ranking requirement. The City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in updating the City's Housing Element for the 2015-2023 planning period. BACKGROUND: The City's current Housing Element was adopted by the City Council on March 2, 2010 and was subsequently certified by the State of California Department of Housing and Community development on May 12, 2010. The current Housing Element covers the planning period of 2009-2014. Staff and the consultant team have reviewed existing programs; evaluated the amount of land remaining for residential development; and, collected data on housing needs, housing constraints and housing resources. On February 25, 2014, a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element including the review process with the State Department of Housing and Community Development. A public meeting notice was sent to developers, service providers, housing advocates, human services task force members, current Human Services Commission members and interested parties who requested notification of public meetings related to the Housing Element update. There were no members of the public in attendance at the public meeting. This is the second public meeting on the update to the General Plan Housing Element. The Planning Commission and interested parties are being asked to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element (Attachment 1) and provide feedback. The Planning Commission is also being asked to adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review (Attachment 2). ANALYSIS: Goals and Policies The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element is substantially the same as the 2009-2014 Housing Element. The goals and policies (Attachment 1, page 5) remain the same and address the following: 2of6 46 Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; Alk Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; 44 Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; *# Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice, and, +lip Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. One minor addition to the goals and policies is including persons with developmental disabilities as a special housing needs population within the larger category of persons with disabilities. One minor deletion to the goals and policies is removing Policy B.6 related to the redevelopment of the Arroyo Vista site (now Emerald Vista). This policy is no longer relevant as the project has been completed. All other goals and policies remain substantially the same as the current 2009- 2014 Housing Element. Housing Programs The Housing Programs (Attachment 1, page 8) implement the goals and policies of the Housing Element and are grouped into the following six categories: 46 Housing Conservation We Production of Housing &W Provision of Adequate Housing Sites Removal of Governmental Constraints Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity Green Building Programs Changes to the Housing Programs include establishing new objectives for the 2015-2023 planning period and removing existing programs which have been completed. Completed programs include redevelopment of the Arroyo Vista site; implementation of the Dublin Transit Center master plan; adoption of a reasonable accommodation procedure; adoption of amendments to the emergency shelter and transitional housing regulations; and, adoption of regulations for supportive housing and single room occupancy units. Appendices The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes a number of appendices. Appendix A includes a summary of public participation in the update process. Appendix B includes a review of accomplishments for the previous 2009-2014 planning period. Appendix C is the technical background report and includes a housing needs assessment; analysis of housing constraints; and, analysis of housing resources. Appendix D is an inventory of vacant and underutilized properties that could contribute to meeting the City's regional housing need obligation. 3 of 6 Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) The State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) is required by law to determine the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA), by income category, for each Council of Governments (COGs) including the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG). The RHNA is based on Department of Finance population projections and regional population forecasts used in preparing regional transportation plans. ABAG is required to allocate to each locality within its region a share of housing need totaling the RHNA for each income category. Localities are required to update their housing element to plan to accommodate its entire RHNA share by income category during the specified planning period. Under the current Housing Element, which covers the 2007-2014 planning period, Dublin's share of the RHNA is 3,330 units. Dublin's share of the RHNA for the 2015-2023 planning period has been reduced by 1,045 units and is as follows: Table 1. Dublin's Re ional Housing Need Allocation (RHNA) Income Category Number of Units Assumed Densities 2007-2014 2015-2023 Very Low 1,092 796 Min. 22 du/acre Low 661 446 Moderate 653 425 10-21 du/acre Above Moderate/ 924 618 Less than 10 du/acre Market Rate Total 3,330 2,285 In order to meet Dublin's share of housing need, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element must show that there is an adequate amount of land at appropriate densities to achieve 2,285 housing units by income category (see Table 1 above). State law has established that lower income units are achievable on land designated for 30 dwelling units per acre or more. However, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element demonstrates that lower income units can also be achieved at 22 dwelling units per acre; moderate income units are considered achievable at 10-21 dwelling units per acre and densities less than 10 dwelling units per acre are considered above moderate/market rate. As of February 2014, seven development projects have been approved, but are not yet under construction, totaling 1,215 units of which 76 are low income and the remaining 1,139 units are above moderate/market rate (see Table 2 below). Additionally, an inventory of vacant residential sites without an approved development project have the potential to provide an additional 965 units of which 448 are at densities considered affordable to moderate income households and 517 are at densities considered affordable to above moderate/market rate households. Between the approved development projects and vacant residential sites, all of Dublin's above moderate/market rate RHNA obligation (618 units) has been satisfied and a small portion of Dublin's lower income RHNA obligation (76 of the 446 units) has been satisfied. The remaining RHNA obligation for very low (796 units), low (370 units) and moderate income (425 units) units is proposed to be satisfied-within the -Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. Amendments to the Specific Plan are currently proposed that would increase the residential development potential within each of the three Specific Plan Districts and establish minimum development densities of 22 dwelling units per acre within the Retail District and 30 dwelling units to the acre in the Transit Oriented District. The existing development density in the Village 4of6 Parkway District is a maximum of 15 dwelling units per acre and is not proposed to be changed. By increasing the residential development capacity and establishing minimum density thresholds, the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area can meet the City's remaining RHNA obligation. Table 2. Dublin's RHNA Sites Invento ry Very Low Moderate Above Total Low Moderate RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Approved Pro'ects 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Vacant Sites 0 0 448 517 965 DDSP TOD 891 0 0 891 Retail 400 0 0 400 Village Pkwy 0 0 200 200 Surplus/Shortfall +125 +23 1 +1,238 1 +1,386 Streamlined Review In December 2012, the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) published their Housing Element Update Guidance to assist local governments with a streamlined update and HCD review. The Update Guidance is designed to create efficiencies and clarity in the housing element update process; reduce the number and scope of housing element submittals per jurisdiction; and, provide for a 60 day review with priority given to jurisdictions utilizing the streamlined review process. The streamlined review process is designed for jurisdictions that have a certified housing element and much of the information from the previous planning period is still current and/or particular conditions and circumstances have not significantly changed since the last update. While the entire Housing Element must still be updated, HCD review will be limited to changes that have occurred since the prior planning period. HCD will not review areas that have not changed since their content continues to be sufficient to meet statutory requirements. Staff will be submitting the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element for the streamlined review process. Next Steps The draft 2015-2023 Housing Element is being presented to the Planning Commission and interested parties for feedback. The Planning Commission is also being asked to adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State Department of Housing and Community Development for review. Should the Planning Commission adopt the Resolution, Staff would present the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the City Council. If authorized by the City Council, Staff would then initiate the State's streamlined review of the Housing Element. The State would review the draft 2015- 2023 Housing Element and provide comments to Staff within 60 days of receiving the draft document. While the State is reviewing the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element, Staff would begin the environmental review process. Once the State determines that the City's Housing Element is certifiable, Staff would return to the Planning Commission and City Council for formal adoption of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 5 of 6 NOTICING REQUIREMENTS/PUBLIC OUTREACH: A public notice was mailed to developers, stakeholders, service providers and interested persons who have expressed an interest in receiving notices regarding the Housing Element update. The public notice was also published in the Tri-Valley Times and posted at several locations throughout the City. A copy of this Staff Report has been posted to the City's website. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with the State guidelines and City environmental regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and when applicable, environmental documents prepared. Staff is recommending that the review of the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element be found Categorically Exempt from the CEQA pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15306, Class 6 (Information Collection). ATTACHMENTS: 1) Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element. 2) Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the Draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. 6of6 City of Dublin 2015-2023 Housing Element Draft May 2014 City of Dublin Community Development Department 100 Civic Plaza Dublin, CA 94568 ATTACHMENT 1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table of Contents Tableof Contents...............................................................................................................i Listof Tables..................................................................................................................... Listof Figures................................................................................................................... iv Introduction...........................................................................................................................1 1. Contents of the Housing Element................................................................................1 2. Consistency with General Plan ...................................................................................2 3. Data Sources...............................................................................................................2 Evaluation of Accomplishments..........................................................................................3 Goalsand Policies................................................................................................................5 1. Range of Housing Types.............................................................................................5 2. Housing Opportunities for Segments of the Population ..............................................6 3. Maintain and Enhance Residential Neighborhoods ....................................................6 4. Promote Equal Housing Opportunities........................................................................7 5. Promote Energy Efficiency and Conservation.............................................................7 HousingPrograms................................................................................................................8 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing .........................................................8 2. Production of Housing 10 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites........................................................................16 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints .....................................................................16 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity..................................................................17 6. Green Building Programs..........................................................................................18 7. Quantified Objectives................................................................................................19 PublicParticipation.............................................................................................................20 1. Service Provider Interviews.......................................................................................20 2. Public Meetings.........................................................................................................21 Appendix A: Public Participation ........................................................................................1 1. Interviews with Service Providers................................................................................1 2. Housing Element Outreach List...................................................................................7 3. Public Meetings.........................................................................................................15 Appendix B: Review of Accomplishments.........................................................................1 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing .........................................................13 2. Production of Housing................................................................................................. 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites........................................................................10 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints .....................................................................11 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity..................................................................16 6. Green Building Guidelines......................................................................................... Appendix C: Technical Background Report.......................................................................1 1. Housing Needs Assessment.......................................................................................1 A. Population Characteristics and Trends.....................................................................2 B. Employment Profile...................................................................................................5 i City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) C. Household Characteristics....................................................................................7 D. Special Needs Populations.................................................................................11 E. Housing Stock Characteristics................................................................................20 F. Affordable Housing Inventory.................................................................................32 G. Estimates of Housing Needs...............................................................................34 2. Housing Constraints..................................................................................................36 A. Market Constraints .................................................................................................36 B. Governmental Constraints......................................................................................38 C. Public Policy Constraints ....................................................................................62 D. Utility and Public Service Constraints .................................................................63 E. Environmental Constraints .....................................................................................65 3. Housing Resources...................................................................................................68 A. Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA)......................................................68 B. Credits against the RHNA ......................................................................................69 C. Future Development Potential ............................................................................70 D. Financial Resources ...........................................................................................77 E. Administrative Resources.......................................................................................78 Appendix D: Vacant and Underutilized Sites in Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ..........1 List of Tables Table 1: Summary of Quantified Accomplishments since 2007..............................................4 Table 2: Quantified Housing Objectives: 2015-2023 ............................................................ 19 Table C-1: Population Growth.............................................................................................C-2 Table C-2: Age Characteristics...........................................................................................C-3 Table C-3: Race/Ethnicity 2010 .......................................................................................... C-5 Table C-4: Employment Profile...........................................................................................C-5 Table C-5: Average Salary by Occupation, Alameda County —2013................................C-6 Table C-6: Household Characteristics................................................................................C-7 Table C-7: Household Income Distribution .........................................................................C-8 Table C-8: Households by Income Category -2010...........................................................C-9 Table C-9: Special Needs Groups....................................................................................C-12 Table C-10: Disability Status.............................................................................................C-15 Table C-11: Housing Stock Growth ..................................................................................C-20 Table C-12: Housing Stock Composition: 2013................................................................C-20 Table C-13: Housing Tenure.............................................................................................C-23 Table C-14: Tenure by Household Size............................................................................C-23 Table C-15: Median Home Sales Prices: 2011-2013........................................................C-25 Table C-16: Home Asking Prices: February 2014 ............................................................ C-26 Table C-17: Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 ......................................................C-26 Table C-18: Housing Affordability Matrix Alameda County...............................................C-30 Table C-19: Inventory of Assisted Rental Housing ........................................................... C-33 Table C-20: Housing Assistance Needs ...........................................................................C-35 Table C-21: Disposition of Home Purchase and Improvement Loan Applications - 2012 C-37 Table C-23: General Plan Land Use Element................................................................... C-39 Table C-24: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ....................................................................C-39 Table C-25: Eastern Dublin Specific Plan.........................................................................C-40 Table C-25: Western Extended Planning Area................................................................. C-41 ii City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-26: Residential Development Standards.............................................................C-43 Table C-27: Dublin Parking Requirements for Residential Uses ......................................C-45 Table C-28: Comparison of Parking Requirements for Residential Uses.........................C-46 Table C-29: Residential Uses by District...........................................................................C-47 Table C-30: Street Design Criteria....................................................................................C-53 Table C-31: Planning Division Fee Schedule....................................................................C-54 Table C-32: Development Impact Fees ............................................................................C-55 Table C-33: Regional Housing Needs Assessment(2014-2022) .....................................C-69 TableC-34: Remaining RHNA..........................................................................................C-70 TableC-35: Vacant Sites..................................................................................................C-71 Table C-36: Amendment to Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ............................................C-74 Table C-37: Greater Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Projects ............................................C-76 Table C-38: Summary of Sites Inventory and Remaining RHNA......................................0-76 iii City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) List of Figures Figure C-1: Age Distribution, 1990-2010 ............................................................................C-3 Figure C-2: Race and Ethnicity, 1990-2010........................................................................C-4 Figure C-3: Average Household Size—2000-2010 ............................................................C-8 Figure C-4: Median Household Income - 2011 ...................................................................C-9 Figure C-5: Overpayment by Household Income..............................................................C-11 Figure C-6: Year Structure Built........................................................................................C-21 Figure C-7: Median Home Sales Price (2013)..................................................................C-25 Figure C-8: Vacant Residential Sites................................................................................ C-72 Figure C-9: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ..................................................................... C-74 iv City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Introduction This document constitutes the fifth revision to the City of Dublin Housing Element, pursuant to State law. This Housing Element covers a planning period from January 31, 2015 through January 31, 2023. The previous Housing Element was adopted by the Dublin City Council in March 2010. 1. Contents of the Housing Element The Housing Element of the General Plan is a comprehensive statement by the City of Dublin of its current and future housing needs and proposed actions to facilitate the provision of housing to meet those needs at all income levels. The policies contained in this Element are an expression of the statewide housing goal of"attaining decent housing and a suitable living environment for every California family," as well as a reflection of the unique concerns of the community. The purpose of the Housing Element is to establish specific goals, policies, and objectives relative to the provision of housing, and to adopt an action plan toward this end. In addition, the Element identifies and analyzes housing needs, and resources and constraints to meeting those needs. In accordance with State law, the Housing Element is to be consistent and compatible with other General Plan elements. Additionally, Housing Elements are to provide clear policy and direction for making decisions pertaining to zoning, subdivision approval, housing allocations, and capital improvements. State law (Government Code Sections 65580 through 65589) mandates the contents of the Housing Element. By law, the Housing Element must contain: • An assessment of housing needs and an inventory of resources and constraints relevant to meeting those needs; • A statement of the community's goals, quantified objectives, and policies relevant to the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing; and • A program that sets forth a schedule of actions that the local government is undertaking or intends to undertake to implement the policies and achieve the goals and objectives of the Housing Element. Although, by nature of the State mandate, the Housing Element has a strong focus on the affordability and availability of housing for low and moderate income households, the Element must also address the housing needs and related policy issues for the entire community and be consistent with the adopted policies of the General Plan. For these reasons, the updated Housing Element strives to balance the desire of residents to maintain the character of existing residential neighborhoods, manage traffic and congestion, and minimize visual and other impacts of new development, while addressing the needs of low and moderate income households and special needs groups (such as seniors and persons with disabilities). This balance will require the City to examine strategies to accommodate higher density housing, mixed-use projects in commercial zones, infill developments, and second units without sacrificing other legitimate community goals. 1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Consistency with General Plan The Dublin General Plan consists of the following elements: 1) Land Use; 2) Parks and Open Space; 3) Schools, Public Lands, and Utilities; 4) Circulation and Scenic Highways; 5) Housing; 6) Conservation; 7) Seismic Safety and Safety; 8) Noise; 9) Community Design and Sustainability; 10) Economic Development; 11) Water Resources; and, 12) Energy Conservation. The Housing Element complements other General Plan elements and is consistent with the policies and proposals set forth by the General Plan. For example, residential densities established in the Land Use Element are incorporated within the Housing Element and form the basis for establishing the residential capacity within the City. Environmental constraints identified in the Seismic Safety and Safety Element are also recognized in the Housing Element. When an element in the General Plan is amended, the Housing Element will be reviewed and modified if necessary to ensure continued consistency among the various elements. The Safety and Conservation Elements of the General Plan include an analysis and policies regarding flood hazard and management information. The City will ensure that updates to these Elements achieve internal consistency with the Housing Element as well. 3. Data Sources In preparing the Housing Element, various sources of information are consulted. The 2010 Census provides the basis for population and household characteristics. Although dated, no better source of information on demographics is widely accepted. In addition, the 2010 Census must be used in the Housing Element to ensure consistency with other Regional, State, and Federal housing plans. However, several sources are used to provide reliable updates of the 2010 Census including the following: • Population and housing estimates by the State Department of Finance; • Labor market statistics by the State Employment Development Department; • Housing market information (including www.realtor.com, www.danews.com, www.rents.com, www.zillow.com); • Special studies and reports on housing issues and market conditions, e.g. Continuum of Care Strategy for the Homeless and Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness; and • Lending patterns for home purchase and home improvement loans from the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data. 2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Evaluation of Accomplishments In order to craft an effective strategy to address the housing needs of the community, the City must evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of existing housing programs and actions. Government Code Section 65588(a) requires each jurisdiction to review its housing element as frequently as appropriate to evaluate: • The appropriateness of the housing goals, objectives, and policies in contributing to the attainment of the state housing goal; • The effectiveness of the housing element in attainment of the community's housing goals and objectives; and • The progress of the city, county or city and county in implementation of the housing element. Table 1 summarizes the City's quantified accomplishments under the 2009-2014 Housing Element. A program-level review is included in the Technical Report. Overall, the City has been effective in implementing the goals and objectives in the previous Housing Element. Through planned development, and master and specific planning processes, the City was able to achieve a significant portion of its Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for the planning period. In November 2007, Windstar Communities was approved to construct 309 high density residential units located adjacent to the West Dublin Bay Area Rapid Transit(BART) Station. The project was subsequently purchased by Essex the project completed construction in March 2014. Future phases of the project include the construction of a 150-room hotel and 7,500 square feet of retail commercial uses. In August 2008, Avalon Bay Communities completed construction of a mixed-use project consisting of 305 high density residential units and approximately 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial at the Dublin Transit Center. The project, now known as Eclipse at Dublin Station, is an apartment community with 10 percent of the units set aside for moderate income households. In March 2011, Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct an additional 505 high density residential apartment units at the Dublin Transit Center. 10 percent of the units will be set aside for moderate income households. The project is currently under construction. In April 2012, Signature Properties completed construction of the Tralee mixed-use project which includes 130 apartment units over 34,950 square feet of ground floor commercial. Shea Homes is currently constructing the remainder of the 103 townhouse units which are also a part of the Tralee project. The City also worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of the Arroyo Vista mixed-income redevelopment project. The City provided application/technical assistance as needed by the developer in order to secure financing and other sources of funding to support the development of the project. The 3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) project was approved by the Dublin City Council in September 2009 and includes the demolition of 150 existing affordable housing units and the construction of 378 new housing units (both attached and detached) including market rate, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and community building. The project includes 194 (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units) affordable units in various income categories. The project was completed in May 2013; all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased and all 14 affordable for-sale units have been sold. In addition, the City continues to implement its Density Bonus, Inclusionary Zoning Regulations, and Commercial Linkage Fee programs, which have been instrumental in the creation of affordable housing in Dublin. Between 2007 and 2013, the City issued 332 permits for construction of affordable housing units, including: 189 very low income units, 99 low income units, and 44 moderate income units. Since 2007, the Alameda County Community Development Agency has assisted 29 Dublin households through the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs. In addition, as of February 2014, a total of 365 Dublin households were receiving rental assistance through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. A total of 26 Dublin households were on the waiting list for rental assistance. In addition, between 2007 and 2013, the City assisted a total of 54 households with first-time homebuyer loans, including: 2 very low income, 1 low income, 44 moderate income, and 7 market households. The City also adopted amendments to the Zoning Ordinance to include provisions for emergency shelters, transitional housing, supportive housing and SROs in April 2011. The City will continue to facilitate the development of housing for persons with disabilities and extremely low income households using in-lieu fees. Table 1: Summary of Quantified Accomplishments Since 2007 Housing Housing Assistance Type Element RHNA Accomplishments" Goals Housing Units to be Constructed Very Low Income (0-50%AMI) 400 1,092 189 Low Income (51-80%AMI) 661 85 Moderate Income(81-120%AMI) 410 653 44 Upper Income(>120%AMI) 800 924 2,326 Total 1,610 3,330 2,644 Housing Rehabilitation Very Low Income(0-50%AMI) 20 --- 17 Low Income(51-80%AMI) 25 --- 12 Total 45 --- 36 Source: City of Dublin, 2014. N ote: New construction units based on building permits issued. 4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Goals and Policies This section of the Housing Element contains the goals and policies the City of Dublin intends to implement to meet its quantified objectives and address a number of important housing-related issues. The following major issue areas are addressed by the goals and policies of this Element: • Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of the existing and future residents; • Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; • Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; • Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and • Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. 1. Range of Housing Types Continuing to provide a balanced inventory of housing in terms of types (e.g., single-family, duplexes, apartments, condominiums, and mixed-use), cost, and style will allow the City to fulfill a variety of housing needs. In addition, providing regulatory and financial assistance as available will be essential to support the production of affordable housing. GOAL A: Expand housing choice and multi-modal transportation opportunities for existing and future Dublin residents. Policy A.1: Ensure the provision of a variety of housing types to fulfill regional housing needs. Policy A.2: Facilitate development of affordable housing through use of financial and/or regulatory incentives, where appropriate and subject to funding availability. Policy A.3: Maintain streamlined procedures for processing new residential development applications. Policy AA: Encourage the development of residential units intended for the special groups, including seniors, large households, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), and the homeless. Policy A.5: Promote affordable housing opportunities within Mixed-Use areas adjacent to public transportation and within walking or cycling distance to places of employment, commerce, recreation and near services. Policy A.6: Support existing emergency shelter programs in the Tri-Valley area. Policy A.7: Encourage greater access to housing for persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities). 5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Housing Opportunities for Segments of the Population New construction is a major source of housing for prospective homeowners and renters but generally requires public sector support for the creation of units affordable to lower income households, especially extremely low income households. A key element in satisfying the housing needs of all segments of the community is the provision of adequate sites for housing of all types, sizes, and prices. The City's General Plan and Zoning Ordinance determine where housing may locate, thereby affecting the supply of land available for residential development. The following goals and policies support the expansion of housing opportunities in Dublin. GOAL B: Expand housing opportunities for all segments of Dublin's population. Policy B.1: Encourage development of affordable housing by non-profit organizations primarily engaged in housing construction or management. Policy B.2: Provide ongoing support to affordable housing developers. Policy B.3: Negotiate with developers to encourage the provision of housing that is affordable to extremely low income households. Policy B.4: Continue to allow second dwelling units on single-family parcels as a means of expanding rental housing opportunities. Policy B.5: Continue to support the development of affordable homeownership housing for first-time homebuyers. 3. Maintain and Enhance Residential Neighborhoods In general, housing over 30 years old may be in need of major rehabilitation, such as a new roof, repair of termite damage, foundation work, and plumbing, etc. With approximately 29 percent of Dublin's housing stock built prior to 1980, preventive maintenance is essential to avoid housing deterioration. Some households, particularly those that have owned their homes for many years and have relatively low house payments, may be able to afford repairs or monthly payments for rehabilitation loans; however, others, especially lower income homeowners, may have difficulty maintaining their homes. Assisting these households will help preserve and improve the City's existing housing stock. GOAL C: Use public and private resources to maintain and enhance existing residential neighborhood characteristics. Policy CA: Continue to provide assistance for the rehabilitation of substandard and deteriorating units. Policy C.2: Encourage the preservation, rehabilitation or, if necessary, replacement of single-family units in order to maintain and enhance the established characteristics of City neighborhoods. 6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 4. Promote Equal Housing Opportunities The City seeks to expand the range of housing opportunities in Dublin, including housing for seniors on fixed incomes, lower and moderate income residents, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), large families, female-headed households with children, and the homeless. In order to make adequate provision for the housing needs of all segments of the community, the City must also ensure equal and fair housing opportunities are available to all residents. GOAL D: Provide housing opportunities for all Dublin residents, regardless of race, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, age, gender, marital status, familial status, disability, source of income, sexual orientation, or any other arbitrary factor. Policy D.1: Support services and programs that fight housing discrimination; direct persons towards agencies that provide assistance to victims of discrimination. Policy D.2: Promote housing along with supportive services, including child care, to meet the special housing needs of seniors, persons with disabilities, single-parents and the homeless. Policy D.3: Encourage the provision of housing to meet the needs of families of all sizes. 5. Promote Energy Efficiency and Conservation Energy conservation can be achieved through environmentally sensitive site planning techniques and implementing building codes that require use of construction materials that maximize energy efficiency. Conserving energy has the dual benefit of reducing housing costs and improving environmental quality. GOAL E: Promote energy efficiency and conservation throughout Dublin. Policy E.1: Promote the use of Green Building techniques in all residential development. Policy E.2: Ensure all new residential development complies with the California Green Building Code and City of Dublin Green Building Ordinance. Policy E.3: Continue to require the recycling of construction waste. Policy EA: Utilize site planning techniques to allow passive energy efficiencies through solar access, landscaping, and building orientation. Policy E.5: Seek opportunities to educate the public about energy conservation. 7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Programs The goals and policies outlined in the prior section address Dublin's identified housing needs, and are implemented through a series of housing programs offered primarily through the Planning and Housing Divisions of the City's Community Development Department. Dublin residents may also be eligible for assistance under programs administered by the County of Alameda. Housing programs define the specific actions the City will undertake to achieve the stated goals and policies. The City's housing programs for addressing community housing needs are described according to the following issue areas: • Housing Conservation • Production of Housing • Provision of Adequate Housing Sites • Removal of Governmental Constraints • Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity • Green Building Programs The housing programs presented on the following pages include existing programs as well as various revised and new programs that have been added to address the City's unmet housing needs and to respond to new State laws. 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing Conserving and improving the housing stock is an important goal for the City of Dublin. Approximately 29 percent of housing units in Dublin were constructed prior to 1980 and are therefore likely to have rehabilitation needs, including new plumbing, roof repairs, foundation work and other repairs. The City supports neighborhood preservation and improvement through housing rehabilitation programs and code enforcement. Other housing conservation needs of the City include existing multi-family rental apartments at-risk of converting to condominiums. Program 1: Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Alameda County administers the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds on behalf of the City. Using CDBG funds, the Alameda County Community Development Agency administers the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs for the City. Low- interest loans up to $1,500 are available to lower income households through the Minor Home Improvement Program. The Major Home Improvement Program makes available loans up to $60,000 at a three-percent annual interest rate for qualified lower income households. Between 2007 and 2013, the Alameda County Community Development Agency has facilitated 12 minor home repair projects, eight paint grants, 11 major rehabilitation projects, and five accessibility grants in Dublin. Accessibility grants benefit persons with disabilities. 8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: CDBG Implementation Alameda County Community Development Agency Responsibility: • Continue to support the Alameda County Community Timeframe and Development Agency to implement the Minor and Major Home Objectives: Improvement Programs (including accessibility grants) with the goal of assisting 32 households over eight years. Relevant Policies: Policy C.1; Policy C.2 Program 2: Housing Choice Voucher Rental Assistance The Housing Choice Voucher Program extends rental subsidies to extremely low and very low income households, including families, seniors, and the disabled. The program offers a voucher that pays the difference between the current fair market rent (FMR) as established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and what a tenant can afford to pay (i.e. 30 percent of household income). The Housing Authority of the County of Alameda administers the program in Dublin. Given the continued need for rental assistance, the City supports and encourages the provision of additional subsidies through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. Financing: HUD Section 8 Implementation Housing Authority of the County of Alameda Responsibility: • Continue to support the assistance of 350 lower income Timeframe and households each year throughout the planning period. Objectives: • Continue to refer interested households and homeowners to the Housing Authority of the County of Alameda. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 Program 3: Code Enforcement The Planning and Building Divisions of the Community Development Department carry out code enforcement and inspection activities as a means to preserve and maintain the livability and quality of neighborhoods. City staff investigates violations of property maintenance standards as defined in the Municipal Code as well as other complaints. When violations are identified or cited, staff encourages property owners to seek assistance through available housing rehabilitation programs. The City will continue to enforce property maintenance standards and abate substandard structures through Code Enforcement. When code violations are unable to be resolved through voluntary compliance or through the nuisance abatement procedure, the City refers such cases to the City Attorney for prosecution. The City Attorney's office may seek injunctions, receivership and civil lawsuits to achieve compliance with City codes. 9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: General fund Implementation Community Development Department, Planning & Building Divisions Responsibility: • Continue to enforce local ordinances relating to property maintenance and substandard housing both proactively and on a Timeframe and complaint basis. Objectives: . Conduct approximately 2,000 residential inspections during the planning period. • Perform annual review of City ordinances. Relevant Policies: Policy C.1; Policy C.2 Program 4: Condominium Conversion Ordinance The City values its rental housing stock as an important means of meeting the housing needs of all income segments of the community. In 2005, the City Council passed a Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing rental housing stock. The ordinance establishes an annual maximum number of rental apartment units that can be converted to seven percent of the total number of multi-family units in developments of 21 or more rental units. The Ordinance also establishes tenant notification and relocation assistance requirements, limits rent increases once a notice of intent to convert has been filed, and gives tenants the right to purchase units. New condominium conversions are also subject to the City's Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. The City will continue to implement the Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing multi-family rental housing stock in Dublin. Financing: Permit processing fees Implementation Community Development Department, Planning Division Responsibility: Timeframe and Monitor conversion activities annually. Objectives: Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy B.5 2. Production of Housing The City of Dublin implements various programs to encourage a diversity of housing types. Part of this diversity is addressed through the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA), which encourages the construction of housing for all economic segments in the community. Housing diversity is important to ensure that all households, regardless of age, income level, and household type, have the opportunity to find housing suited to their need and lifestyle. The following programs support the provision of additional housing opportunities in Dublin. Program 5: Mixed Use Development Locating high density residential uses in compact mixed-use areas where residents have convenient access to jobs, shopping, services, recreation, and multi-modal transportation options can produce a number of community benefits. For example, traditionally non- residential areas may be suitable to provide additional capacity for higher density housing. Many residents within these areas are also less dependent upon private automobile travel, often resulting in positive environmental effects and more money for other necessary expenses. 10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City will continue to promote high-density residential mixed-use projects in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area and adjacent to or in close proximity to the City's two Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Stations provided that infrastructure can support higher densities. The City will undertake the following actions to promote mixed-use: • Promote mixed-use opportunity sites; • Continue to implement the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan; • Use the Planned Development process to allow flexible development standards such as alternatives for parking, building height, floor-area ratio, lot-coverage limits, and residential density, to promote mixed-use developments; and • Provide incentives for affordable housing in mixed-use projects, including reduced parking requirements, use of Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund, assistance in accessing state and federal subsidies, and density bonuses. Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund; minor administrative cost to Financing: the City Implementation Community Development Department, Planning Division Responsibility: Timeframe and Facilitate the construction of 100 high-density residential units Objectives: within mixed-use developments within the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.5; Policy B.2; Policy B.5 Program 6: Affordable Housing Developers Recognizing that an adequate supply of affordable housing cannot be supplied by the market, the City will cooperate with developers that specialize in below market rate housing to expand the supply of units affordable to lower income households, including extremely low income households. The City has an excellent track record in facilitating the development of affordable housing. Camellia Place, the Groves at Dublin Ranch, Wicklow Square, and the new Arroyo Vista projects all include a range of affordable units, including units for extremely low households. The City will offer assistance in accessing local, state, and federal funding for affordable housing by: 1) applying for such funding on behalf of affordable housing developers when eligible applicants are limited to public agencies; or 2) providing technical assistance or documentation necessary to support applications for funding by affordable housing developers upon request. The City can help locate potential sources of matching funds and provide other technical assistance. Technical assistance will include, but not be limited to the provision of data or documents within the City's possession that will contain necessary information or assist in the preparation of a successful grant application. The City can also write letters of support (for projects that have received permit approvals by the City). 11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Negotiate specific incentives package for each project. • Provide application/technical assistance as needed. Timing of applications or technical assistance will depend on application deadlines for funding sources. Timeframe and • Provide assistance to affordable housing developers within the Objectives planning period to facilitate the construction of 100 affordable housing units within the planning period, with the goal of achieving some affordable units for extremely low income households and persons with special needs (including persons with disabilities/development disabilities). Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 7: Density Bonuses The City adopted a Density Bonus Ordinance in March 2007 to comply with State law (SB 1818 enacted-2005 and SIB 435 enacted 2006). Only one developer has applied for and received a density bonus since adoption of the City's Density Bonus Ordinance. Density bonuses are infrequently used in Dublin because the City's High Density Residential land use designation allows 25 units per acre and up, without a maximum upper density limit. In addition to density increases, the Density Bonus Ordinance has other provisions that could facilitate the expansion of housing opportunities. The City will work with developers on a case-by-case basis to provide regulatory concessions and incentives to assist with the development of affordable and senior housing. In a relatively small city like Dublin, this is the most effective method of assisting developers, as each individual project can be analyzed to determine which concessions and incentives would be the most beneficial to the project's feasibility. Regulatory concessions and incentives could include, but are not limited to, reductions in the amount of required on-site parking, and modified or waived development standards. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council Timeframe and Continue to implement the Density Bonus Ordinance and provide Objectives: information on the Ordinance to developers and other interested parties. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 8: Inclusionary Zoning Under the City's Inclusionary Zoning program, all new residential development projects of 20 units or more designed and intended for permanent occupancy must construct 12.5 percent of the total number of dwelling units within the development as affordable units. Of the affordable rental units, 30 percent must be set aside for very low income households, 20 percent for low income households, and 50 percent for moderate income households; of the owner occupied affordable units, 40 percent must be set aside for low income households and 60 percent for moderate income households. Upon request, the City Council can allow 12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) the applicant to pay a fee in-lieu of constructing up to 40 percent of the affordable units that the developer would otherwise be required to construct. In certain instances, the City Council may allow a developer to construct the affordable units "off-site" and an applicant may dedicate land to the City or City-designated local non-profit housing developer in-lieu of construction of some or all of the required affordable units. In-lieu fees will be placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. The Ordinance provides for five exceptions to the 12.5 percent affordability requirement (Section 8.68.040): • Payment of in-lieu fees; • Off-site projects; • Land dedication; • Credit transfers; and • Waiver of requirements. This last exception, waiver of requirements, gives the City Council flexibility to make exceptions to the Ordinance. Also, Section 8.68.070 provides incentives to make the construction of affordable units more feasible, including: • Fee Deferral—processing and impact fees • Design Modifications- - Reduced lot size - Reduced setback requirements - Reduced open space requirements - Reduced landscaping requirements - Reduced interior or exterior amenities - Reduction in parking requirements - Height restriction waivers Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council. • Facilitate the construction of 100 affordable housing units either Objectives:bjame and through direct construction or through the Inclusionary Housing Object In-Lieu Fund within the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 9: Commercial Linkage Fee The City approved a Commercial Linkage Fee on May 3, 2005. Fees are charged to non- residential developments, based on the square footage and type of commercial building space and placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. The In-Lieu Fee Fund has a balance of $7,013,816 as of April 1, 2014. The funds are to be used in accordance with Section 8.68.080 of the Zoning Ordinance, summarized as follows: • Affordable housing construction loans; • First Time Homebuyer Loan Program; • Homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services; • Housing Division's administrative costs; and 13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Financing: Inclusionary In-Lieu Fee Fund; Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council • Facilitate the construction of 50 affordable housing units within the planning period (10 very low, 15 low, and 25 moderate income units). Timeframe and • Assist five moderate income households with first-time Objectives: homebuyer loans. • Provide funding towards homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services, rental assistance programs and the Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.2; Policy A.3; Policy B.1; Policy B.2; Policy B.3 Program 10: Housing Type and Size Variations A diverse housing stock in terms of type and size is necessary to meet the needs of all community residents. As a means of achieving housing diversity, the City will continue to require diversity of housing type and size as part of its negotiated process through specific plans, planned developments, and development agreements. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council Timeframe and Require that developers provide a diversity of housing type and Objectives: size on a case-by-case basis to meet the City's housing needs throu hout the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.4; Policy A.6; Policy A.7; Policy B.1; Policy B.3; Policy B.4; Policy B.S; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 Program 11: First-Time Homebuyer Programs In 2006, the City initiated a First Time Homebuyer Loan Program (FTHLP) to assist households with financing towards the purchase of a home. The FTHLP program provides 30-year deferred loans for households earning up to 120 percent of the County median income. The FTHLP program may be used in conjunction with the Alameda County Mortgage Credit Certificates (MCC) program and assistance from the City's Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund and other state or federal home ownership programs. Financing: MCC; HOME; Inclusionary Housing In-Lieu Fund Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Assist 20 income-qualified first time homebuyers during the Timeframe and planning period. Strive to provide assistance to approximately 10 Objectives above moderate income and 10 moderate income households. • Distribute FTHLP application packets at the Civic Center, City website, and locations that provide housing services. Relevant Policies: Policy B.5; Policy B.6 14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Program 12: Second Dwelling Units Second dwelling units can be a source of affordable housing with limited impacts on existing neighborhoods and public infrastructure. The City will promote the development of second units on lots with existing single-family homes as well as in new construction. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission Responsibility: • Market this program through an informational brochure. The Timeframe and brochure will be available on the City web site and at the Civic Objectives: Center, library, senior center, and other public locations. Facilitate the construction of 30 second dwelling units within the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy 6.4 Program 13: Homeless Assistance The City will continue to support the Alameda County Homeless Continuum of Care Council (HCCC) and support agencies and organizations that seek to address the problem of homelessness throughout the region. Dublin provided funding to the Alameda Countywide HCCC for development of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). The HMIS is intended to collect and report information about the homeless population and its patterns of service utilization. The City also provides Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds to the Tri-Valley Haven to assist a domestic violence shelter (Shiloh) and a homeless shelter(Sojourner House), both located in Livermore. Financing: CDBG; Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council • Continue to fund emergency shelter programs in the Tri-Valley Timeframe and area to house residents in need of emergency shelter. Objectives: • Continue to participate in regional collaborations to address homelessness. Relevant Policies: Policy A.4; Policy A.6; Policy D.2 Program 14: Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee The City is an active partner with the Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee and assists with organization of the Affordable Housing Fair. The purpose of the Affordable Housing Fair is to educate residents, developers, non-profit organizations, and decision-makers about affordable housing sites and resources available in the region. The City will continue to seek grants and partnerships with housing providers, civic organizations, and neighboring cities to defray costs associated with this fair. The City will also continue to support local housing service providers which are coordinated by the Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Committee. 15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: Timeframe and Participate in at least one affordable housing fair annually Objectives: throughout the planning period. Relevant Policies: Policy D.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites Meeting the housing needs of all segments of the community requires the provision of adequate sites for all types, size and prices of housing. The City's General Plan and Zoning Ordinance determine where housing may locate, thereby affecting the supply of land available for residential development. Program 15: Residential Sites Inventory The City will continue to use specific plans, planned development, and zoning to ensure that adequate sites are available (as defined by state housing element law, Government Code section 65583) to accommodate the City's Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for all income groups. Each year, as part of the City's annual evaluation of its implementation of the General Plan, the City will compare the remaining supply of land by zoning, specific plan, or planned development in relation to the City's remaining unmet RHNA. Should the City identify a potential shortage of sites with appropriate densities, it will use the specific plan and planned development process to provide adequate sites for future residential developments. Financing: Minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: • Annually evaluate the land availability to meet the remaining Timeframe and RHNA. Ensure adequate capacity exists to accommodate the Objectives: RHNA of 2,285 units (796 very low, 446 low, 425 moderate, and 618 above moderate income units). Relevant Policies: Policy A.1; Policy A.5; Policy B.6 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints Under State law, the Housing Element must address, and where legally possible, remove governmental constraints affecting the maintenance, improvement, and development of housing. The following programs are designed to mitigate government constraints on residential development and facilitate development of housing affordable to lower and moderate income households, including families, seniors, and persons with special needs. Program 16: Fee Deferment or Amortization The City will continue to offer deferment or amortization of planning/development fees for senior housing units and affordable units for lower and moderate income households to reduce the initial cost impact on an affordable housing project. The City will determine on a case-by-case basis the financial need of the project and the most appropriate type of assistance based on the City's Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance. 16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Financing: Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund Implementation Community Development Department; Planning Commission; and Responsibility: City Council Timeframe and Continue to offer the deferment or amortization of fees as an Objectives: option to interested parties. Relevant Policies: Policy A.2 Program 17: Universal Design Ordinance In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. In 2010, the Ordinance was amended to meet the current building code and which took effect January 1, 2011. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City has developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance and updates it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. Financing: Permit processing fees Implementation Community Development Department Responsibility: Timeframe and Continue to make the brochure and other related information Objectives: available on the City's website and at the public counter. Relevant Policies: Policy A.4; Policy A.7 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity To adequately meet the housing needs of all segments of the community, the Housing Plan must include program(s) that promotes housing opportunities for all persons regardless of race, religion, sex, family status, marital status, ancestry, national origin, color, age, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, source of income, or any other arbitrary factor. Program 18: Equal Housing Opportunity The City of Dublin contracts through Alameda County with ECHO Housing to investigate fair housing complaints and provide fair housing counseling and mediation services. The City is the point-of-contact for fair housing complaints, information requests, and referrals to ECHO housing. Financing: CDBG; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department; ECHO Housing; and Alameda Responsibility: County Community Development Agency Provide referrals to appropriate agencies for services. Distribute fair housing information to public locations. Timeframe and • Post information on the City website. Objectives: . Distribute information to real estate agents, rental property owners/managers, and financial institutions in Dublin. Participate in Alameda County's Impediments to Fair Housing 17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Study through the CDBG program. Relevant Policies: I Policy D.1; Policy D.2; Policy D.3 6. Green Building Programs Green building refers to the use of environmentally preferable practices and materials in the design, location, construction, operation, and disposal of buildings. It applies to both renovation and retrofitting of existing buildings and construction of new buildings, whether residential or commercial, public or private. By continually improving how we locate, design, build, operate, and retrofit buildings, the City of Dublin can contribute to the improvement of the environment and quality of life. Advanced energy-saving technologies applied in buildings can result in enormous reductions in demand for fossil fuels and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Better design and building practices can also help address environmental challenges such as natural resource depletion; waste disposal; and air, water, and soil pollution. Green building can also help achieve gains in human health and prosperity. Program 19: Green Building Guidelines The City Council has established as a high priority to enhance residential green building requirements to create a mandatory Green Building self-certification program as part of the permitting process. The City adopted a Green Building Ordinance in April 2009. The Ordinance applies to all residential projects over 20 units. In November 2010, the Ordinance was updated and the changes went into effect January 1, 2012. A brochure was developed in 2009 at the time of the original adoption and the City continues to update the brochure as revisions are made to the Ordinance. Financing: Permit processing fees; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department, Building Division Responsibility: • Continue to implement the provisions of the Green Building Timeframe and Ordinance. Objectives: 0 Continue to update brochures that describe program requirements and make them available to any interested parties. Relevant Policies: Policy E.1; Policy E.2; Policy E.3; Policy EA Program 20: Energy Conservation The City will promote energy conservation through the following actions: • Continue to implement the Waste Management Authority's model ordinance on recycling of construction waste. • Continue to implement state building standards (Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations) regarding energy efficiency in residential construction. • Continue to provide on-site training for City Building and Planning Staff on Green building techniques. 18 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Continue to review proposed developments for solar access, site design techniques, and use of landscaping that can increase energy efficiency and reduce lifetime energy costs without significantly increasing housing production costs. • Provide access to information on energy conservation and financial incentives (tax credit, utility rebates, etc.) through public information to be provided at the City's public counter, on the City's web site, at public libraries and community centers. Financing: Permit processing fees; minor administrative cost to the City Implementation Community Development Department, Building Division Responsibility: ame and Implement applicable Waste Management and Building Code Objectives: regulations, provide Green Building training to City staff, and distribute energy conservation information to the public. Relevant Policies: Policy E.1; Policy E.2; Policy E.3; Policy E.4; Policy E.5 7. Quantified Objectives The City of Dublin summarizes the program objectives for the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Quantified Housing Objectives: 2015-2023 RHNA Home Repair/ Rental Home At-Risk Income Category (Construction) Rehabilitation Assistance Assistance Housing Extremely Low 398 0 0 0 Income 350 Very Low Income 398 16 0 0 Low Income 446 16 0 0 Moderate Income 425 0 0 10 0 Above Moderate 618 0 0 10 0 Income Total 2,285 32 350 20 0 19 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Public Participation Section 65583 (c)(6)(B) of the Government Code states that "The local government shall make diligent effort to achieve public participation of all the economic segments of the community in the development of the housing element and the program shall describe this effort." The City of Dublin undertook a comprehensive public participation program in the development of the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 1. Service Provider Interviews As part of this Housing Element update, the City of Dublin consulted with affordable housing developers and nonprofit service providers to obtain input on housing needs and suggestions for housing programs. Fifteen agencies and developers that serve lower and moderate income households, as well as those with special housing needs were contacted. Seven agencies participated in the telephone interviews and these are: Abode Services/Allied Housing; Community Resources for Independent Living; Eden I & R; Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley; Satellite Affordable Housing Associates; Tri-Valley Haven; and Tri-Valley Reach. Their comments are summarized below: • Affordable Housing: There is significant demand for additional affordable rental and ownership housing to accommodate the housing needs of low-income residents and those with special needs. • In general, affordable housing developers need assistance in identification of sites and funding. • Easing development standards can also increase the feasibility of sites. • Creative thinking is needed from City staff in order to avoid common development constraints. • Housing Element policies and programs should prioritize the creation of extremely low-income (ELI) units and provide incentives for developers. • Homeless: There is a lack of emergency shelter and support services for Tri-Valley area homeless. • Specifically, there is a large need for shelter and housing programs for single men. • Supportive housing is also needed to transition homeless persons from transitional housing and emergency shelters. • Section 8: The demand for Section 8 housing has increased over the last few years. o There has been a decline in the number of properties accepting Section 8 Vouchers in the Tri-valley area. • Supportive Services: Increased availability and funding of supportive services that can aid with living expenses are needed. o There needs to be additional support from city staff to direct residents to services and coordinate with providers about program changes. Appendix A summarizes the agencies consulted, the services they provide, and housing needs identified. 20 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Public Meetings The City conducted public meetings before the Planning Commission and City Council to discuss housing needs and to review the Draft Housing Element: • February 25, 2014— Planning Commission • May 13, 2014— Planning Commission • June 3, 2014—City Council Comments received during these meetings are summarized in Appendix A. 21 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix A: Public Participation 1. Interviews with Service Providers Abode Services/Allied Housing 40849 Fremont Boulevard Fremont, CA 94538 Louis Chicoine, Executive Director Services Provided: The focus of Abode Services is on ending homelessness and to ensure that those in need are able to obtain and retain housing. They offer housing programs linked to support services for low-income and homeless families and individuals in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties. Each Abode program integrates these two components to help people establish permanent stability and return to independent lives. Housing options include emergency shelter, rental subsidies, transitional housing and permanent supportive housing. Support services include case management, primary and mental health care, substance recovery services, job counseling and placement, life skills classes, financial literacy training, practical tenancy training, parenting classes, and children's programs. Abode Services and Allied housing merged as an effort to consolidate their service capacity. As an affordable housing developer they specialize in developing small-scale housing developments that are affordable to families and households with special needs, such as persons with disabilities or households moving out of homelessness. Their housing development work also focuses on providing affordable housing that is linked with supportive services to assist low-income and special needs households to achieve and maintain housing stability and self-sufficiency. Population Served: A wide-range of vulnerable groups benefit from their services including children, emancipated foster youth, adults and transition-age youth living with severe mental illness, low-income families in vocational training, dually-diagnosed heads of households, single mothers, victims/survivors of domestic violence, seniors and people living with HIV/AIDS. Housing Needs: As one of the fastest growing services providers in the Bay Area, there has been a large increase in the demand for their services and programs. Over the last few years, within the Tri-Valley area, Abode Services has worked with the cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to run programs that provide rental assistance. They have not done any projects in the City of Dublin. Chicoine noted that its organization focuses on housing that may not be appropriate in suburban communities such as Dublin where costs and neighborhood acceptance may be barriers. He suggested that their Rapid Re-Housing program, which provides for quick housing placement within communities, has been an effective program that is easy for cities to use. Lastly, he suggested that Housing Elements need to prioritize the creation of extremely-low income units. Policies and programs which reward developers that create housing units and services for lower income households are needed. This can serve to incentivize and kick start the creation of the types of housing that lacks in the region. Appendix A-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Community Resources for Independent Living (CRIL) 3311 Pacific Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 Alejandra Hernandez, Employment Benefits Coordinator Services Provided: CRIL is a peer-based disability resource organization that advocates and provides resources for people with disabilities to improve lives and make communities fully accessible. CRIL is also a resource for disability awareness education and training, advocacy and technical advice. Among its many programs, CRIL's housing assistance services help people with disabilities and seniors with functional limitations with understanding the process in obtaining accessible, low income housing, primarily within Alameda County. CRIL keeps a current list of local rentals and reaches out to landlords to encourage renting to individuals with disabilities; however, they do not own housing or run their own residential facility. Their Livermore office offers Housing Workshops twice monthly where they share information on how to seek and apply for affordable and/or accessible housing in Alameda County, or in some cases outside of the County. Population Served: CRIL offers its services at no charge to persons with disabilities living in southern and eastern Alameda County. In order to become a CRIL consumer, an individual must have a disability or functional limitation and be able to benefit from independent living services. Everyone is welcome regardless of race, ethnicity, the nature of the disability or limitation, age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, immigration status, health condition or any other characteristics. Staff at the CRIL's Livermore office estimate 10 to 20 Dublin residents utilize their services a month. Housing Needs: Above all else, there is a high demand for more low-income affordable housing and housing for persons with specials needs in the Tri-Valley area. Demand for their housing assistance services, and affordable housing in general, has increased over the last few years. Most significantly, there has been an increase in the need for section 8 housing. However, there has been a decline in properties who participate in the program. This is a problem that they have noticed in Alameda County overall, but especially within the Tri-Valley area. CRIL has benefitted from the Season of Sharing`s provision of one-time crisis-based assistance in coordination with their housing location services. This working relationship recently proved successful in assisting a client with funding to place a rental deposit and obtain housing. Further funding and support of these types of coordinated efforts would greatly aid the CRIL in assisting their clients. Eden I & R, Inc. 570 B. Street Hayward, CA 94541 Barbara Bernstein, Executive Director and Alison DeJung, Deputy Director Services Provided: Eden I&R's mission of "linking people and resources" and services offered are the result of collaborations that depend on the work of hundreds of community- based organizations. They offer a range of housing and service related programs, including: the AIDS Housing and Information Project (AHIP); Roving Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing; After-Hours Emergency Phone Services for Alameda County's Child and Adult Protective Services, Foster Care Placement Line, and the Public Guardians Office; Disaster Recovery Services; Housing Database; Social Services Database; Big Blue Book; and various seasonal programs. Over half of all calls they receive are related to housing callers needing assistance finding emergency shelter, transitional and supportive housing, Appendix A-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) mental health housing, and more permanent types of housing. Overall, the issues they deal with have a lot of components to them. Eden I&R also encounters callers with housing sustainability problems, including issues such as, utility assistance, rental assistance, transportation, tenant rights, employment, childcare. One of the keys to the success of their services is their approach in which staff gathers specific household information from callers with housing needs. This allows them to identify potential assistance opportunities that they may be able to utilize to reduce other living expenses, and can leave these households with more money for housing. They are the only agency in Alameda County to offer a comprehensive housing database listing of over 80,000 affordable housing units, including subsidized, low-income, and shared units. The housing database is effective through its two-pronged approach, giving those in need of housing access to a listing of affordable properties and connecting landlords/owners to potential tenants. The database offers free listing services to landlords/owners who qualify. In order to expand the listing, Eden I&R conducts outreach to landlords/owners through a lot of different ways, the most effective of which has simply been word of mouth. Their goal is to work with them to list their units as affordable through methods such as lowering their rates, renting out a room, or agreeing to accept Section 8 vouchers. Population Served: Since no other centralized source for health, housing, and human services information exists anywhere else in Alameda County, Eden I & R has become a critical resource for thousands of at-risk individuals, such as youth, non-English speakers, the economically disadvantaged, people living with HIV/AIDS, domestic violence survivors, the elderly, disabled, the homeless, and human service agencies seeking services or housing for their clients. Eden I&R serves over 100,000 Alameda County residents a year. Housing Needs: Countywide there are not enough affordable housing opportunities to meet the needs of their callers. The issue is only becoming more challenging as federal funding available in support of affordable housing continues to decrease. Although resources are not always available to directly connect callers to housing, Eden I & R's approach to connect callers with other resources to cut other living expensive often proves effective in increasing a caller's ability to pay for housing. However, they estimate that they miss approximately 19,000 calls a year due to a shortage in staff. Funding to expand their 2-1-1 special resource specialist staff would greatly impact their capability to link these missed callers with resources that can spare them money for housing. As one of the top service providers in the County for low-income individuals, Eden I & R would greatly benefit from additional support for its programs. In particular, additional assistance with expanding its housing database would be impactful. Mom-and-pop landlords can serve as one of the biggest resources to expanding affordable housing opportunities in the County. More importantly, these types of housing opportunities can serve as a way to distribute the stigma often associated with public or low-income housing. This can also lead to the integration of low-income residents into communities that may appear uninviting to them. They need additional support from housing department staff from cities throughout the County and Tri-Valley area to conduct outreach to these mom-and-pop landlords to list with Eden I & R. With increased efforts from city staff they estimate they could more than expand their housing database and thus expand access tp affordable housing opportunities. An increase in Eden I & R staff capacity for this program would also be beneficial and allow them conduct more of the outreach that is crucial to the expansion of their housing database. Appendix A-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) There is need for more people to become aware of the 2-1-1 services and other programs offered. They have benefited greatly from partnering with cities throughout the County, including the City of Dublin, and rely on city staff to refer residents to their services. Eden I & R can benefit from increased communication from staff of expected changes in services, programs, and affordable housing opportunities. Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley 2619 Broadway Oakland, CA 94612 David Pitson, Controller Services Provided: Habitat's overall focus is on developing affordable ownership housing through new construction, home renovation, and home repair. The program provides first time affordable homeownership opportunities for low and very low income families with children. In addition to working on their homes through the sweat equity or self-help program, families also attend workshops on budgeting, credit repairs, conflict resolution and home maintenance, repair and landscaping. Population Served: They primarily serve families who make 40 to 80 percent of the AMI. Sometimes they aid families who make 80 to 120 percent of the AMI, but never over 120 percent. Habitat aims to provide housing opportunities not for engineers or executives at large companies, but for the workforce who are janitors, teachers, and servers. Within the Tri-Valley area they are currently working mostly in the cities of Pleasanton and Livermore to purchase homes to rehabilitate. Housing Needs: Overall there is a huge need for affordable housing within the East Bay region, including the Tri-Valley. There are a lot of jobs being created in the Silicon Valley area, of which Dublin is on the periphery, but the housing opportunities to match this growth are not being developed at the same pace. Habitat has worked with the City of Dublin in the past, but land in the City is very expensive and hard to develop. Cities often employ a philosophy that they must utilize government funding for affordable rental housing development in order to maximize the number of units. However, the ownership housing model that Habitat uses is also effective in producing large number of units for those most in need. Habitat is interested in working with the City of Dublin in the future and is also open to partnering with market-rate developers to create affordable housing components of future developments. Satellite Affordable Housing Associates (SAHA) 1521 University Avenue Berkeley, CA 94703 Eve Stewart, Director of Housing Development Services Provided: SAHA develops and manages affordable, service-enriched housing that promotes healthy and dignified living for people with limited options. Residents at nearly every SAHA community have access to a wide variety of supportive services, activities, and civic engagement programs. Resident services offered at their communities that house elderly individuals are especially helpful in providing for residents to live as independently as possible. Population Served: The population served is low income families, seniors and special needs (disabled and developmentally disabled). All have incomes of 60 percent or below Appendix A-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) AMI, with the average income being 30 to 50 percent AMI. They are able to aid those who fall below 30 percent in circumstances where they are additional subsidy assistance is available. Within the last few years they've started developing housing for people who are currently homeless, instead of only focusing on those who are at-risk. They serve a wide geographic area, including properties in Sacramento, but are currently most active within their core area of focus in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. Within the Tri-Valley area they completed a project in Livermore a couple of years ago, but have not done any projects in Dublin, nor in neighboring Pleasanton. Housing Needs: There is a large need to make housing that is accessible for populations of all incomes and those with special needs. There are no specific reasons SAHA has not worked with the City of Dublin; however, Eve noted that some of the more suburban locations can prove more difficult for them to develop in. They often encounter issues with site zoning. Of the projects they've most recently completed, the lowest density they successfully developed at allowed about 25 units per acre. Zoning that accommodates 25 units per acre is a minimum for their developments, but 30 units per acre would be preferred. Finding appropriate sites can also be a problem, as most of their projects require about two acres of land. Local funding is an essential component of their developments, especially when tax credits are involved. City staff need to be able to think creatively about development standards (e.g. setbacks, easements and parking) that constrain development, in order to make a project happen. In general, working with cities that have high response and turn-around standards, and good city council and planning commission leadership can make all the difference for the success of a project. Tri-Valley Haven 3663 Pacific Avenue Livermore, CA 94550 Ann King, Executive Director Services Provided: Provides shelter and counseling for survivors of sexual assault, battered women and their children in the Tri-Valley area. They operate the County's only 24- hour rape crisis center and have homeless services and shelters. With 30 beds, Tri-Valley Haven's Shiloh Domestic Violence Shelter houses and supports women and their children who are victims of domestic violence. The Haven's 16-bed Sojourner House, located in the City of Livermore, provides temporary shelter for homeless families in a safe, supportive environment. With separate bedrooms for family units, a stocked kitchen, three full baths, and laundry facilities, Sojourner House is the only homeless shelter in the Tri-Valley Area that accepts two-parent families, single fathers with children, and families with teenage boys. Supportive services, including counseling, housing assistance, long-term support, legal clinic, employment assistance, seasonal provisions, and educational support are offered through its shelters and other programs. Tri-Valley Haven also operates a food pantry based in Livermore that serves over 4,000 low-income Tri-Valley residents a month. The food pantry program offers mobile services at two additional locations in the City of Pleasanton. Population Served: Their programs serve Tri-Valley residents from cross all income groups, who are adults and children who have experienced domestic violence, sexual assault, or homelessness. Most of their clients are usually very low income. They also operate the only homeless shelter in the Tri-Valley Area that accepts single fathers accompanied by their children, and boys over the age of 10. Appendix A-5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Needs: Low-income affordable housing is a significantly pressing need for the Tri- Valley area. They struggle to graduate people from their shelter programs into more permanent housing due to the lack of availability in the area. There is also a large need for shelter and housing programs for single men. Homelessness in the Tri-Valley area has worsened over the last few years, to the extent that King described it as almost becoming a part of common life and accepted by the community. Many Tri-Valley residents become homeless due to the unstable housing market, and other issues such as medical bankruptcy and drug/alcohol reliance. Homelessness mostly goes unseen in the area, but this may change. The Tri-Valley area has the opportunity and needs to respond now to prevent homelessness from becoming an issue that is seen everywhere within its local communities. There is a general lack of support for homeless programs and services at the federal level. The expectation has been for churches and non-profit organizations to pick up the slack with no funding support. Available funding is nowhere near the level needed to match current demand in the area. Current activities undertaken by Tri-Valley Haven include attempting to coordinate with both the Cities of Livermore and Pleasanton to convert the Livermore emergency shelter for families into a shelter for single men, and to open a new family shelter in Pleasanton. Past support provided by the City of Dublin has been very helpful, including the City's assistance with efforts made to renovate the Haven's facilities. They're looking into opening a one-stop shop day center for Tri-Valley area homeless that will provide comprehensive shelter and supportive services. The City of Dublin can aid the Haven's efforts through providing capital funding for the project early on, and by also helping to achieve the political will in the Tri-Valley area necessary to make such a project happen. Tri-Valley Reach P.O. Box 5564 Pleasanton, CA 94566 Judy Butterly, Co-Chair Services Provided: Their mission is to provide resources, education, activities, community participation and housing opportunities that will enable adults with developmental challenges to live full and independent lives. Their housing assistance program offers eligible clients the opportunity to live independently. Currently they own a total of nine properties in Livermore and Pleasanton—ranging from duplexes to condo's to single family residences. They modify their homes to suit each residents' special needs and work in close collaboration with the Regional Center of the East Bay to provide supportive services. Population Served: Currently, their homes support 21 tenants in Livermore and Pleasanton. To be eligible for residency, tenants must be a client of the Regional Center and either live in the Tri-Valley area or have family members who live in the Tri-Valley. Given that all of the properties they currently own are in Livermore and Pleasanton, the majority of their clients are from these areas. They serve adults of any age, with most tenants ranging in age from 30 to 60 years old. Judy noted that adults with special needs who are younger than 30 tend to live at home with their families for as long as possible. Housing Needs: Demand for their services has been fairly stable over the last few years. They have a small waitlist, but quite often when vacancies do become available the potential tenants are not fully prepared or ready to live independently. Potential expansion of their housing placement program would be dependent on an increase in demand for their housing, of which they currently are not experiencing. Butterly added that this lack in demand for housing is not representative of other independent living programs in the area, Appendix A-6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) such as group homes, which may be experiencing an increase in housing needs. With staff knowledge and experience, they have the capabilities to be able to effectively respond to future increases in demand for their housing. They do not own properties in the City of Dublin as there has not been demand for their housing in the area. For this reason they have not recently pursued housing in the Dublin as an option, but they are aware that the City would be welcoming to such possibilities in the future. 2. Housing Element Outreach List Standard Pacific Homes Dublin Land Company Attn: Doug Batson Attn: John DiManto 3825 Hopyard Rd., Ste 195 1210 Coleman Ave. Pleasanton, CA 94588 Santa Clara, CA 95050 Charter Properties Alameda County SPA Attn: Jim Tong Attn: Stuart Cook 4080 Grafton Street, Suite 200 224 W. Winton Av, Room 110 Dublin, CA 94568 Hayward, CA 94544 Braddock & Logan Kaiway Investments 10 Attn: Jeff Lawrence c/o Mr. Michael Tseng 4155 Blackhawk Plaza Cir,#201 1499 Bayshore, #132 Danville, CA 94506 Burlingame, CA 94010 Avalon Bay Communities, Inc. Milton & Gloria Righetti et al Attn: Jeff White 3088 Massachusetts Avenue 400 Race Street, Ste. 200 Castro Valley, CA 94546-2964 San Jose, CA 95123 Anderson Second Family LP Blake Hunt Ventures P.O. Box 910371 Attn: Jerry Hunt St. George, LIT 84791-0371 500 La Gonda Way Ste.295 Danville, CA 94526 Collier Canyon Properties c/o Bob Branaugh DR Horton 19077 Madison Avenue Attn: Dean Mills Castro Valley, CA 94546 6630 Owens Drive Pleasanton, CA 94588 EBJ Partners LP 550 Hamilton Avenue, #329 Toll Brothers Palo Alto, CA 94301-2031 Attn: Rick Nelson 100 Park Place, Ste. 140 Pat Croak San Ramon, CA 94583 4617 James Avenue Castro Valley, CA 94546 Discovery Homes Attn: Albert Seeno III Jordan Charitable Trust 4061 Port Chicago Highway, #H c/o Tony Varni Concord, CA 94520 Varni, Fraiser, Hartwell & Rodgers 650 "A" Street Hayward, CA 94543 Appendix A-7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Monte Vista Entitlement, Inc. Mission Valley Homes c/o T. W. Starkweather Attn: Kevin Fryer 1501 N. Broadway, #320 5000 Hopyard Road, #170 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 Pleasanton, CA 94588 Robert & Shirley Branaugh Essex Property Trust, Inc. 979 Oak Manor Way Attn: Josh Corzine Pleasanton, CA 94566 925 E. Meadow Drive Tracy, CA 94303 Martin W. Inderbitzen Attorney at Law EBJ Partners, LP P.O. Box 1537 112 Washington Avenue, #250 Pleasanton, CA 94566 Richmond, CA 94801-3990 AMB Property Corporation Argent Management Attn: Mark Hansen, Sr. VP Attn: Joe Guerra 1360 Willow Road, #100 97 S. 2nd Street, Suite 300 Menlo Park, CA 94025 San Jose, CA 95113 SCS Development Company Mr. Robert Chen Attn: Mike Sullivan 160 Tobin Clark Drive 404 Saratoga Avenue, #100 Hillsborough, CA 94010-7444 Santa Clara, CA 95050 BJP ROF Jordan Ranch LLC KB HOME Nor. California/Bay Area 5000 Hopyard Road, #170 Attn: Ray Panek, Sr. VP Pleasanton, CA 94588-3349 5000 Executive Parkway, Suite 125 San Ramon, CA 94583 Dublin Corporate Center LLC 400 S. Hope Street, #200 Righetti Partners Los Angeles, CA 90071-2805 c/o Milt Righetti 1900 Embarcadero, #301 Thomas A & Lelene Fredrich Oakland, CA 94606 6960 Tassajara Road Dublin, CA 94568 Kaiser Foundation Hospitals 1950 Franklin, #6 Jose and Violeta Vargas Oakland, CA 94612-5103 7020 Tassajara Road Dublin, CA 94568 Regent Properties Attn: Pat Costanza Apostolic Church of Fremont 3526 Villero Court 14850 Highway 4, Box 268A Pleasanton, CA 94566 Discovery Bay, CA 94505 Eden Housing, Inc. Carolyn Adams Attn: Faye Blackman 5374 Tassajara Road 22645 Grand Street Dublin, CA 94568 Hayward, CA 94541 Valley Christian Center Attn: Real Estate Dept. 7500 Inspiration Circle Dublin, CA 94568 Appendix A-8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Pacific Union Holdings, Inc. Gary S. Vandeweghe, Esq. Attn: Bruce Myers 96 No. Third Street, Suite 500 675 Hartz Avenue, # 300 San Jose, CA 95112 Danville, CA 94526 Brookfield Homes Alameda Cty Surplus Prop. Authority Attn: Kevin Poulson Attn: Stuart Cook 500 La Gonda Way, Suite 100 224 W Winton Ave, Room 110 Danville, CA 94526 Hayward, CA 94544 K Hovnanian Homes SummerHill Homes Attn: Scott Montgomery Attn: Wendi Baker 1375 Exposition Blvd. # 300 3000 Executive Parkway Sacramento, CA 95815 San Ramon, CA 94583 Harry Crosby Kingsmill Group 834 Fifth Avenue, #1 C, Attn: Marshall Torre New York, NY 10065 P.O. Box 2445 San Ramon, CA 94583 Westgate Ventures Attn: Jon Revells Phil Kerr 2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd, Ste 224 City Ventures San Ramon, CA 94583 444 Spear Street, Ste. 105 San Francisco, CA 94105 Trumark Homes Attn: Chris Davenport Tony Bowskowski 4185 Blackhawk Plaza Circle, Ste 200 City Ventures Danville, CA 94506 444 Spear Street, Ste. 105 San Francisco, CA 94105 Kingsmill Group Attn: Keith Fichtner 4900 Hopyard Road, Suite 100 Pleasanton, CA 94588 MacKay & Somps Attn: Mark McClellan 5142 Franklin Drive, Ste B Pleasanton, CA 94588 Westgate Ventures Attn: Adam Tennant 2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd, Ste 224 San Ramon, CA 94583 K Hovnanian Homes Attn: Carrie Gooding 1375 Exposition Blvd. # 300 Sacramento, CA 95815 Appendix A-9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Advocates Contact Company Name Address City State ZIP Susan Friedland Affordable Housing Associates 1250 Addison Street Suite G Berkeley CA 94702 Robert Ratner Alameda Country Behavioral Health Care 2000 Embarcadero Suite 400 Oakland CA 94606 Services Cove Michael Pucci Alameda Housing Authority 701 Atlantic Avenue Alameda CA 94501 T. Louis Chicoine Allied Housing/Abode Services 40849 Fremont Blvd Fremont CA 94538 Kent Elisworth Bay Area Community Services 1814 Franklin Street Fourth Oakland CA 94612 Floor James Hamill California Communities 2999 Oak Road Suite 710 Walnut CA 94597 Creek California Home Source 1714 Franklin Street #100-175 Oakland CA 94612 Sheri Burns Community Resources for Independent 439 A Street Hayward CA 94541 Living(CRIL)Main Office Community Resources for Independent Living(CRIL)Tri-Valley Office 3311 Pacific Avenue Livermore CA 94550 David Stark Bay East Association of Realtors 7901 Stoneridge Drive Suite 150 Pleasanto CA 94588 Patricia Jones East Ba Communit Foundation 200 Frank H.Ogawa M y y Plaza Oakland CA 94612 Joel Tena East Bay Housing Organizations(EBHO) 538 9th Street Suite 200 1 Oakland CA 94607 Marjorie Rocha ECHO Housing-Administrative Office 770 A Street Hayward CA 94541 A. ECHO Housing-Livermore Office 3311 Pacific Avenue Livermore CA 94550 Linda Mandolini Eden Housing,Inc. 22645 Grand Street Hayward CA 94541 Surlene Grant Envirocom Communications Strategies,LLC 13804 Bancroft Avenue Leandro CA 94578 Elaine De Coligney EveryOne Home 224 W.Winton Ave Room 108 Hayward CA 94544 Darin R. Lounds Housing Consortium of the East Bay(HCEB) 1440 Broadway Suite 700 Oakland CA 94612 Ter A. Freeman Klein Financial Corporation 550 S.California Terry p Avenue Suite 330 Palo Alto CA 94306 Patty Revell Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory PO Box 808 Livermore CA 94551 Cristian Martinez Northern California Community Loan Fund 870 Market Street Suite 677 F ancisco CA 94102 Appendix A-10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Advocates Contact Company Name Address C ity State ZIP E Rau Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern 369 Pine Street Suite 350 San CA 94104 California(NPH) Francisco Edrington Rental Housing Association 1264 A Street Hayward CA 94541 Montoyama Resources for Community Development 2220 Oxford Street Berkeley CA 94704 Peterson Senior Support Services 5353 Sunol Blvd n leasanto CA 94566 King,MSW Tri-Valley Haven 3663 Pacific Avenue PO Box Livermore CA 94551 2190 Rickman Tri-Valley Housing Opportunity Center 20 South L Street Livermore CA 94550 Behrend Tri-Valley Interfaith Poverty Forum 3311 Pacific Avenue Livermore CA 94550 Geof P.E. s, E. Xenergy 492 Ninth Street Suite 220 Oakland CA 94607 P. Appendix A-11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Human Services Task Force Contact Company Address City State Zip Phone Email Uma Bird Dublin Resident 4673 Pheasant Dublin CA 94568 925-216- uma.bird(a-gmail.com Court 5771 Marilyn Briones Dublin Resident 7703 Chantilly Drive Dublin CA 94568 925-551- marilynbriones(d),yahoo.cc 8548 m Sue Compton Axis Community 4361 Railroad Pleasanto CA 94566 925-201- scompton(a) Health n 6005 axishealth.orq Albert Edge Dublin Senior 7088 Amador Valley Dublin CA 94568 925-833- atedge(a com cast.net Foundation 1866 Gloria Gregory Valley Christian Center 3115 Gulfstream Pleasanto CA 94566 925-998 gigregorV(c)comcast.net Street n 3785 Lee Jouthas Dublin Library 3690 Mosswood Lafayette CA 94549 925-803- liouthas(aaclibrary.org Drive 8266 Kimberly Kemp Dublin Resident 6379 Sussex Court Dublin CA 94568 925-719 kimlkemp(ayahoo.com Brown 2326 Ann King Tri-Valley Haven 3663 Pacific Avenue Livermore CA 94550 925-449- ann(dtrivalleyhaven.orq 5845 Rameet Kohli Dublin Resident 2387 W.Cantara Dublin CA 94568 202-288 rameet.kohli;a}g mail.com Drive 4991 Terry Lacey St.Raymond's Church 7045 Prince Drive Dublin CA 94568 925-548- tilacev us(¢vahoo.com 5073 John Ledahl Dublin Resident 11823 Kilcullin Court Dublin CA 94568 925-551- 1 5965 ohnledahl(agmail.com Janet Lockhart Dublin Partners in 8051 Brittany Drive Dublin CA 94568 925-819 ianetindublin(c)yahoo.com Education 0463 Claudia McCormic Dublin Resident 7170 Emerald Dublin CA 94568 925-828 chindidub(aaol.com k Avenue 1672 Mary McHugh Dublin Resident 7767 Canterbury Dublin CA 94568 925-828 mimibrew(o vahoo.com Lane 3038 Amy Miller Dublin Resident 7402 Hansen Drive Dublin CA 94568 925-577 amvmiller55,! vahoo.com 5866 Bidi Millet Dublin Resident 8730 Putname Court Dublin CA 94568 925-381- bidieves(acomcast.net 8782 Don Mutch Dublin Resident 4107 Clarinbridge Dublin CA 94568 925-828 dhm,(d�email4us.net Circle 4618 Milly Seibel TVHOC 141 N. Livermore Livermore CA 94550 925-373- miseibel(a tvhoc.org Appendix A-12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Human Services Task Force Contact Company Address City State Zip Phone Email Ave 1 3130 tMelissa den Dublin Reside nt 7771 Ridgeline Dublin CA 94568 415-238- melissa.sladden(a)hotmail. Drive 2206 com kamot Valley Christian Center 6500 King Way Dublin CA 94568 g25-808 suewna comcast.net 8770 yland Dublin Resident 3115 Finnian Way, Dublin CA 94568 9496 60- owavlandmichele(a�vahoo.c #243 Housing Organizations Contact Organization Address City State Zip Susan Friedland Affordable Housing Associates 1250 Addison Street Suite G Berkeley CA 94702 Kelly Thiemann Alameda County Housing&Community 224 W.Winton Suite 108 Hayward CA 94544 Development Rick Cristino Bonita House,Inc. 6333 Telegraph Ave Suite 102 Oakland CA 94609 Mike Rawson California Affordable Housing Law Project 449 15th Street Suite 301 Oakland CA 94612 Matt Schwartz California Housing Partnership Corporation 369 Pine Street Suite 300 San Francisco CA 94104 Joel Rubenzahl Community Economics,Inc 538 9th Street Suite 200 Oakland CA 94607 John Baumann Congregations Organizing for Renewal 22634 2nd Street Suite 209 Hayward CA 94541 COR Louise Bourassa Contra Costa Interfaith Housing 978 2nd Street Suite 240 Lafayette CA 94549 Jonathan Hunter Corporation for Supportive Housing 1330 Broadway Suite 601 Oakland CA 94612 Lynette Jung Lee East Bay Asian Local Development 310 8th Street Suite 200 Oakland CA 94607 Corp oration EBALDC Janice Jensen East Bay Habitat for Humanity 2619 Broadway Suite 205 Oakland CA 94612 Richard Gross Enterprise Community Investments,Inc. 100 Bush Street Suite 600 San Francisco CA 94104 Robert Mills Goldfarb&Lipman LLP 1300 Clay Street 9th Floor Oakland CA 94612 Aki Nakao Green Building in Alameda County 1537 Webster Street Oakland CA 94612 Darin Lounds Housing Consortium of the East Bay 1736 Franklin Street 6th Floor Oakland CA 94612 Land is Development,LLC 1714 Franklin Street Suite Oakland CA 94612 100-240 Stephaine Forbes Local Initiatives Support Corporation(LISC), 369 Pine Street Suite 350 San Francisco CA 94104 Bay Area Appendix A-13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Organizations Contact Organization Address City State Zip Nancy Andrews Low Income Investment Fund 100 Pine Street Suite San Francisco CA 94111 1800 Barney Deasy Merritt Community Capital Corporation 1970 Broadway Suite 250 Oakland CA 94612 Matt Franklin Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition 303 Vintage Park Dr Suite 250 Foster City CA 94404 Mary Rogier Northern California Community Loan Fund 870 Market Street Suite 677 San Francisco CA 94102 Ryan Chao Satellite Housing,Inc. 1521 University Avenue Berkeley CA 94704 Jack Gardner The John Stewart Company 1388 Sutter Street 11th San Francisco CA 94109 Floor Louis Chicoine Tri-City Homeless Coalition 40849 Fremont Blvd Fremont CA 94538 Appendix A-14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 3. Public Meetings February 25, 2015 - Planning Commission Meeting No public comments were received. May 13, 2014- Planning Commission Meeting June 3, 2014- City Council Meeting Appendix A-15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix B: Review of Accomplishments Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program I Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing Program 1: Housing Rehabilitation Continue to support the Alameda Accomplishments: Between 2007 and 2013, the Alameda County Assistance County Community Development Community Development Agency has facilitated 12 minor home repair Using CDBG funds, the Alameda County Agency to implement the Minor and projects, 8 paint grants, 11 major rehabilitation projects, and five Major Home Improvement accessibility grants in Dublin. Community Development Agency administers the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be Programs for the City. Facilitate 25 minor home repairs, appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 10 paint grants, 10 major home improvements during the planning period. Program 2: Housing Choice Voucher Rental Continue to support the assistance Accomplishments: As of February 2014, a total of 365 Dublin Assistance of 150 very low and extremely low households were receiving rental assistance through the Housing The Housing Authority of the County of income households each year Choice Voucher Program. A total of 26 Dublin households were on throughout the planning period. the waiting list for rental assistance. Alameda administers the program in Dublin. Given the continued need for rental assistance, Continue to refer interested Emerald Vista,formally known as Arroyo Vista,has historically been the City supports and encourages the provision households and homeowners to the supported by the Housing Choice Voucher Program. Emerald Vista of additional subsidies through the Housing Housing Authority of the County of has been redeveloped to include 378 units of which 194 will be Choice Voucher Program. Alameda. affordable(180 rental units and 14 for-sale units).The redeveloped project will continue to be supported by the Housing Choice Voucher Program.In addition,the Housing Choice Voucher Program supports the following projects:Avalon at Dublin Station(now Eclipse at Dublin Station); Camellia Place; Oak Groves at Dublin Ranch; Park Sierra Apartments, Pine & Cedar Groves at Dublin Ranch; and, Wicklow Square,a senior complex. The City of Dublin continues to refer interested households and homeowners to the Alameda County Housing Authority to be placed on a list for qualification. In addition, information on developments within the City that accept Section 8 vouchers is provided in the Tri- Valley Area Affordable Rental Housing Directory which is available on- line; hard copies of the Directory can also be obtained at the City's public counter. Appendix B-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table 13-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 3: Code Enforcement • Continue to enforce local Accomplishments:Between 2008 and 2013,the City's Planning and The City will continue to enforce property ordinances relating to property Building Code Enforcement Divisions opened 3,104 residential cases maintenance standards and abate substandard maintenance and substandard for code violations. structures through Code Enforcement. housing both proactively and on a In 2008, the City reviewed the Dublin Municipal Code (DMC) and complaint basis. updated the following Ordinances: • Conduct approximately 1,700 . DMC 5.70 Weeds and Refuse(Ord.29-08) residential inspections during the planning period. . DMC 5.72 Rodents and Fly Control(Ord.30-08) • Perform annual review of City . DMC 5.64 Property Maintenance(Ord.31-08) ordinances. DMC 5.68 Graffiti(Ord.32-08) Also in 2008,the following new Ordinance was added to the Dublin Municipal Code to address residential foreclosures: • DMC 5.66 Maintenance of Foreclosed Residential Properties (Ord.44-08) In 2009,the City updated the following Ordinance: • DMC 5.64 State of Partial Construction(Ord.02-09) In 2011,the City updated the following Ordinance: Chapter 5.56 Smoking Pollution Control(Ord.10-11) Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 4: Condominium Conversion Monitor conversion activities Accomplishments: The City continues to monitor conversion Ordinance annually. activities annually.There were no condominium conversions between The City will continue to implement the Calendar Years 2007 and 2013. Condominium Conversion Ordinance to Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be preserve the existing multi-family rental housing appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. stock in Dublin. Appendix B-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation 2. Production of Housing Program 5:Mixed Use Development Facilitate the construction of 100 Accomplishments: In November 2007, Windstar Communities was The City will undertake the following actions to high-density residential units within approved to construct 309 high density residential units located promote mixed-use: mixed-use developments within the adjacent to the West Dublin Bay Area Rapid Transit(BART)Station. planning period. The project was subsequently purchased by Essex and and the • Promote mixed-use opportunity sites; project completed construction in March 2014.Future phases of the project include the construction of a 150-room hotel and 7,500 square • Use the specific planning process to feet of retail commercial uses. allow for, and provide regulatory incentives for, mixed-use development, In August 2008,Avalon Bay Communities completed construction of a such as the specific plan that was mixed-use project consisting of 305 high density residential units and adopted for the West Dublin BART approximately 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial at the Station area; Dublin Transit Center.The project, now known as Eclipse at Dublin Station,is an apartment community with 10%of the units set aside for • Use the Planned Development process moderate income households. to allow flexible development standards such as alternatives for parking,building In March 2011,Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct height, floor-area ratio, lot-coverage an additional 505 high density residential apartment units at the Dublin o limits,and residential density,to promote Transit Center.10 the units will be set aside for moderate income households.The project is currently under construction. mixed-use developments;and In April 2012, Signature Properties completed construction of the • Provide incentives for affordable housing Tralee mixed-use project which includes 130 apartment units over in mixed-use projects, including reduced 34,950 square feet of ground floor commercial. Shea Homes is parking requirements,use of Inclusionary currently constructing the remainder of the 103 townhouse units which Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund, assistance in are also a part of the Tralee project. accessing state and federal subsidies, and density bonuses. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 6:Affordable Housing Developers . Negotiate specific incentives Accomplishments:During the planning period,the City worked with Recognizing that an adequate supply of package for each project. Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the Emerald Vista Project (formally known as Arroyo Vista). This affordable housing cannot be supplied by the • Provide applicationttechnical public/private partnership has involved various agreements between market,the City will cooperate with developers assistance as needed. Timing of the entities including vouchers,land and other incentives to facilitate that specialize in below market rate housing to applications or technical assistance the development of the project. In addition, the City expedited the expand the supply of units affordable to lower will depend on application processing of the entitlements to the greatest extent possible. income households, including extremely low deadlines for funding sources. income households. The City also provided application/technical assistance as needed by • Provide assistance to affordable the developer in order to secure financing and other sources of housing developers within the Appendix B-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table 5-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation planning period to facilitate the funding to support the development of the project. The project was construction of 100 affordable approved by the Dublin City Council in September 2009 and includes housing units within the planning the demolition of 150 existing affordable housing units and the period (5 extremely low, 20 very construction of 378 new housing units(both attached and detached) low, 35 low, and 40 moderate including market rate, affordable senior housing, affordable family income units). housing, a child care center and community building. The project includes 194(180 rental units and 14 for-sale units)affordable units in various income categories. The project was completed in May 2013: all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased and all 14 affordable for-sale units have been sold. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 7:Density Bonuses Accomplishments: The City of Dublin continues to encourage The City will work with developers on a case-by- developers to provide affordable housing by awarding qualifying case basis to provide regulatory concessions • Facilitate the construction of 50 developments with additional market rate units. The City did not and incentives to assist with the development of affordable units during the planning receive any requests for a density bonus between Calendar Years affordable and senior housing. period(10 very low,20 low,and 20 2007 and 2013. moderate income units). Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 8:Inclusionary Zoning • Facilitate the construction of 1,000 Accomplishments:Between 2007 and 2013,the City has issued 332 The City completed major revisions to their affordable housing units either permits for construction of affordable housing units, including: 189 Inclusionary Zoning Regulations in 2002 and through direct construction or very low income units,99 low income units,and 44 moderate income 2008 in order to assure that housing through the Inclusionary Housing units. development continues to contribute to the In-Lieu Fund within the planning In December 2008,the City Council approved an amendment to the attainment of the City's housing goals by period. Specific construction increasing the production of residential units targets include 300 very low, 200 Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance to eliminate the requirement to affordable b households of very low, low, and construct owner-occupied very low income units. This modification Y rY IOW, and 500 moderate income as in response to feedback the City was receiving from the moderate incomes. units. ,,v p y g development community on the feasibility of constructing owner • Work with the stakeholders,review occupied very low income units.During Calendar Year 2009,the City and consider modification of the was in the process of updating the Housing Element. The updated Inclusionary Zoning Regulations to Housing Element was adopted on March 2,2010. In April 2013, City enhance feasibility as needed Staff met with stakeholders to review and consider modifications to within two years of the adoption of the Inclusionary Zoning Regulations to enhance the feasibility of the the Housing Element. Regulations. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be Appendix B-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table 19-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 9:Commercial Linkage Fee Facilitate the construction of 50 Accomplishments: Since 2007, the City has collected a total of to be used in accordance with affordable housing units within the $418,143 in commercial linkage fees. The funds are Section 8.68.0 to a the Zoning Ordinance, planning period (10 very low, 15 Between 2007 and 2013,the City has assisted 45 moderate income summarized as follows: low, and 25 moderate income units). households with first-time homebuyer loans. • Affordable housing construction loans; gssist five moderate income The City continues to support the Tri-Valley Housing Opportunity households with first-time Center(TVHOC)through a$25,000 community grant.The TVHOC is • First Time Homebuyer Loan Program; designed to serve as a one-stop center for affordable homeownership • Homeownership training and foreclosure homebuyer loans. in the Tri-Valley and offers foreclosure prevention services, rental prevention services; Provide funding towards assistance and pre- and post-purchase counseling to clients. In homeownership training and addition to the grant amount,in 2012,the City of Dublin,awarded the • Rental assistance programs; foreclosure prevention services, TVHOC $56,667 for on-going operating expenses and financial • rental assistance programs and the obligations and to assist with the delivery of services. Partnerships Housing Division's administrative costs; Alameda County Homeless were formed with the cities of Dublin, Livermore and Pleasanton and and Management Information System. the TVHOC to assist with future operations. Details are still in the • Alameda County Homeless Management negotiation stage. Information System. In addition, the City continues to support the Alameda County Homeless Management Information System through the Housing In- Lieu Fund.The Alameda County Homeless Management Information System(HMIS)is managed by EveryOne Home,a community based organization formed in 2007 under the fiscal sponsorship of the Tides Center.EveryOne Home manages the County's in-house HMIS in the collection and reporting of the homeless count and other data collection. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 10: Housing Type and Size Require that developers provide a Accomplishments: In January 2007, the Planning Commission Variations diversity of housing type and size approved the Wallis Ranch project, a 935 unit residential As a means of achieving housing diversity,the on a case-by-case basis to meet development. The project has 6 distinct neighborhoods of varying City will continue to require diversity of housing the City's housing needs densities including low, medium and medium high. Residential units type and size as art of its negotiated o rosins throughout the planning period. include, single family detached with a granny flat option YP P 9 P (Neighborhood 1); 5-unit detached cluster homes around a motor through specific plans, planned developments, court (Neighborhood 2); row houses and condominiums; and development agreements. (Neighborhood 3);mufti-family stacked flats(Neighborhood 4);single family detached with alley garages and a granny flat option Appendix B-5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation (Neighborhood 5), and, multi-family stacked flats and walk up townhomes(Neighborhood 6). In April 2007,the City Council approved the Sycamore Grove project, a 304 unit high density residential condominium project with 22 live/work units. The live/work units have been designed as 3-story townhomes, 278 units are condominium flats; and the remaining 4 units are also 3-story townhomes(but not live/work units). In September 2007, the Planning Commission approved Phase I of the Positano project, a 247 unit single family detached residential development in two distinct neighborhoods, Solerno and Cantara. Solemo provides 175 units and 4 different floor plans; Cantera provides 72 units and 5 different floor plans. Six additional neighborhoods have since been approved at Positano: Cortona (August 2010) for the development of 68 single family detached homes with 4 different floor plans, Livorno(September 2010)for the development of 69 single family detached homes with 3 different floor plans;Biella(October 2010)for the development of 101 single family detached homes with 4 different floor plans, Calabria(October 2011) for the development of 88 single family detached homes with 3 different floor plans;Cortona 11(October 2011)for the development of 70 single family detached homes on 6,000 square foot lots with 5 different floor plans; and, Calarosa (November 2011) for the development of 71 single family detached homes on 4,000 square foot lots with 3 different floor plans.The Positano project will also provide 19 second units. In November 2007, the Planning Commission approved the Fallon Crossing project, a 106 unit single family residential development including 8 duets,and 3 private motor courts.The first neighborhood at Fallon Crossing, Chateau, will provide 98 homes with 3 different floor plans. In December 2008, the City Council approved a General Plan Amendment for Schaefer Ranch South to convert 12 estate residential lots to up to 104 single family detached homes. In September 2009, the City Council approved the Emerald Vista project(formerly Arroyo Vista)for the construction of 378 residential units. The project includes both detached and attached housing, Appendix B-6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation market-rate and affordable for-sale units,and affordable senior rental and family rental housing. The project was completed in May 2013. In June 2010, the City Council approved 781 residential units at Jordan Ranch: 235 single family detached units, 111 cluster homes, 94 small lot alley homes,218 townhomes and 105 mixed use units.In December 2011, the Planning Commission approved the first two neighborhoods in Jordan Ranch: Winwood will provide 85 single family homes on 5,200 square foot lots with 3 different floor plans; Mariposa will provide 81 single family homes on approximately 4,000 square foot lots with 3 different floor plans. Phase 4 of Silvera Ranch will provide 44 single family homes with up to 4 floor plans. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 11: First-Time Homebuyer Assist 75 income-qualified first time Accomplishments:Between 2007 and 2013,the City assisted a total Programs homebuyers during the planning of 54 households with first-time homebuyer loans,including:two very In 2006, the City initiated a First Time period. Strive to provide assistance low income,one low income,44 moderate income,and seven market In 200 , Loan Program (FTHL F st assist to approximately 15 above households. households with financing towards the purchase moderate income, 50 moderate The City provides information on its website to First Time Homebuyers of a home. income households and 10 low wishing to receive assistance with the purchase of their first home. income households. The website is routinely updated to provide current information on • Distribute FTHLP application various housing opportunities in Dublin and the region. Included on packets at the Civic Center, City the website are the Inclusionary Zoning Regulations and adopted website,and locations that provide Inclusionary Zoning Guidelines to assist developers with the housing services requirements related to the development of affordable housing units. In calendar year 2011, one particular development, The Terraces, excelled in their marketing of the City's First time Homebuyers Loan Program in which 5 of the 7 loans were to purchasers at the Terraces. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 12:Second Dwelling Units Market this program through an Accomplishments:In September 2009,the City updated its Second The City will promote the development of informational brochure. The Unit brochure. The brochure explains the purpose and intent of a lots with existing single-family brochure will be available on the second unit as well as the permitting procedures and development second units on lo homes as well as new construction. City web site and at the Civic standards.The brochure is made available to the public on the City's Center, library, senior center, and websfte and at the public counter.The City of Dublin also publishes a Appendix B-7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation other public locations. quarterly Housing Newsletter which is provided to the City Council, Facilitate the construction of 15 posted on the City's website and made available to the public at the second dwelling units within the Civic Center,library and senior center.Articles,including information about Second Dwelling units,are routinely included in the Newsletter. planning period. Since 2003,a total of 89 second units have been constructed in the City;88 of which were constructed during the last planning period. Positano's Fallon Village development introduced second dwelling units as an additional housing opportunity. A second dwelling unit (also commonly referred to as an "in-law or granny unit") is a self- contained residential dwelling located on the same lot as an existing primary residential dwelling. Within Positano, there are several neighborhoods that include second dwelling units which are outlined below. In addition, in 2012, Schaefer Ranch (Discovery Builders) incorporated 6 secondary dwelling units into their project. Also in 2012, the first permits were issued for Standard Pacific's first duet concept in the City of Dublin in their Chateau at Fallon Crossings project.The project contains 106 units of which 8 are three and four bedroom duets. The homes are located on corner lots and have separate entries and garages. There are five homes for moderate income families and three homes for low income families.Throughout the planning period, building permits have been issued for the following second dwelling units: Livorna C-1 =8 Cortona C-2=6 Calabria-D-2=2 Schaefer Ranch=4 Chateau=4 The City expects an additional 30 second units to be constructed during the current Housing Element planning period(2015-2023). Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Appendix B-8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation Program 13:Homeless Assistance Continue to fund emergency shelter Accomplishments:Funds for Dublin residents for this program were The City will continue to support the Alameda programs in the Tri-Valley area to exhausted in 2010, therefore, no new Dublin residents received Homeless Continuum of Care Council house residents in need of assistance during the 2011,2012 or 2013 reporting periods;however, County County and support agencies and emergency shelter. the City of Dublin continues to support the Tri-Valley Haven's Domestic Violence Shelter and Homeless Shelter through Community organizations that seek to address the problem Continue to participate in regional Support Grant funds. of homelessness throughout the region. collaborations to address homelessness. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 14: Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Participate in at least one Accomplishments:In March 2011,the City participated in the Better Committee affordable housing fair annually Homes & Gardens Tri-Valley Realty's Housing Assistance Forum The City will continue to seek rants and throughout the planning period. which highlighted various affordable housing programs throughout the y 9 Tri-Valley.In addition,in June 2011,the City,in conjunction with Tri- partnerships with housing providers, civic Valley Affordable Housing Committee, coordinated and hosted a organizations, and neighboring cities to defray Symposium—"Is the Real Estate Market Meeting the Needs for First costs associated with this fair. Time Homebuyers?° — Real estate and mortgage professionals The City will also continue to support local gathered to discuss this interesting topic. housing service providers which are Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be coordinated by the Tri-Valley Affordable appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Housing Committee. Appendix B-9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program I Timeframe and objectives Evaluation 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites Program 15:Residential Sites Inventory Annually evaluate the land Accomplishments: The City annually evaluates land availability to The City will continue to use specific plans, availability to meet the remaining meet its remaining RHNA.Table C-35 in Appendix C of the updated planned development, and zoning to ensure RHNA. Ensure adequate capacity Housing Element demonstrates that the City has adequate vacant exists to accommodate the sites available to accommodate the remaining RHNA of 1,730 units. that adequate sites are available zoning defined by state housing lement law, Government Code remaining RHNA of 1,730 units Table C-35 in Appendix C of the update Housing Element section 65583) to accommodate the City's demonstrates that the City has adequate vacant sites available to Regional Housing Needs Allocation(RHNA)for moderate income units). accommodate the remaining RHNA of 1,730 units. The City will all income groups. Each year, as part of the Propose modifications to be continue to monitor projects to ensure that development proposals are City's annual evaluation of its implementation of implemented as needed as part of consistent with the updated Housing Element. the General Plan, the City will compare the the City's ongoing planning efforts Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be remaining supply of land by zoning, specific or at the time development appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. plan, or planned development in relation to the proposals are submitted to the City. City's remaining unmet RHNA. Should the City identify a potential shortage of sites with appropriate densities,it will use the specific plan and planned development process to provide adequate sites for future residential developments. Program 16:Arroyo Vista Site • Strive to achieve 180 affordable Accomplishments:The Dublin City Council approved a General Plan In the summer of 2006, the Dublin Housing housing units on the site, including Amendment,Planned Development Rezone with a Stage 1 and Stage Authority reviewed proposals for the 20 extremely low, 40 very low, 50 2 Development Plan,Tentative Map, Site Development Review and reconstruction of the Arroyo Vista project. The low,and 70 moderate income units. associated environmental review for the Arroyo Vista project in Housing Authority selected a conceptual September 2009.The project includes the demolition of 150 existing 9 Y p Ensure compliance with all affordable housing units and the construction of 378 new housing development plan and authorized staff to begin applicable relocation,displacement, units(both attached and detached)including market rate, affordable negotiations with a development team of Eden and replacement housing senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and Housing and Citation Homes to redevelop the requirements. existing site with approximately 378 housing community building. The project includes approximately 194 units,in a combination of affordable and market affordable units in various income categories. rate, rental and ownership units. HUD has The Dublin Housing Authority adopted a Relocation Plan for the approved the disposition of the site, and City relocation of Arroyo Vista tenants and relocations were complete in staff and the developer are proceeding with the July of 2010. The Plan provided for relocation benefits that meet or project. exceed the requirements of applicable law.These included counseling and advisory services, help with packing for disabled and senior residents if requested, security deposits, credit check fees, com arable re lacement housin in the form of a Section 8 voucher Appendix B-10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table 8-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation or,if ineligible,a replacement housing payment,and a 150-day notice to move(upon notice).The Relocation Plan demonstrates that there are adequate available housing resources for the displaced households and that the Dublin Housing Authority provided advisory assistance and relocation benefits necessary to ensure that all households are adequately housed in the event of displacement.The Relocation Plan also demonstrated that the impacts of displacement was mitigated by the provision of relocation benefits. As the new redeveloped project progressed,former tenants were sent notices to keep them abreast of the status of the project. Former tenants were given contact information regarding the purchase of a home or future rental opportunities.The project was completed in May 2013. Continued Appropriateness: This program is completed and is no longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 17:Dublin Transit Center Facilitate the review, approval Accomplishments:In June 2008,construction was completed on the In December 2002,a Master Development Plan and/or construction of 900 housing Elan at Dublin Station project,a 257 unit condominium complex at the for the Dublin Transit Center was approved by units during the planning period. Dublin Transit Center. In September 2008, construction was completed on the Avalon at Dublin Station project, a 305-unit the City Council.The Transit Center is located apartment community at the Dublin Transit Center. In March 2011, adjacent to the existing Dublin/Pleasanton Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct 505 high-density BART Station. Up to 1,800 units of high density residential apartment units at the Dublin Transit Center. 10%of the residential housing is allowed within the Dublin units will be set-aside for moderate income households.The project is Transit Center area. The City will continue to currently under construction.To date,a total of 1,067 units have been implement the Master Development Plan as a constructed or are under construction at the Dublin Transit Center. means of expanding housing opportunities for housing needs of all segments of the Continued Appropriateness:This program is completed and is no community. longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints Program 18:Fee Deferment or Amortization Assist 100 units through the Accomplishments: The City currently participates in the Statewide deferment or amortization of fees, Community Infrastructure Program(SCIP).In 2010,the City expanded The City will continue to offer deferment or amortization of planning/development fees for subject to funding availability (15 their participation to include mufti-family and mixed use residential extremely low,25 very low,35 low, projects. senior housing units and affordable units for and 25 moderate income units). lower and moderate income households to Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be reduce the initial cost impact on an affordable appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. housing project. The City will determine on a case-by-case basis the financial need of the Appendix B-11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation project and the most appropriate type of assistance based on the City's Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance. Program 19:Universal Design Ordinance Produce a brochure on universal Accomplishments:The City developed a brochure on the Universal In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design design, resources for design Design Ordinance after its adoption in December 2007.The brochure Ordinance that requires new single-family home approaches, and compliance with was updated in September 2009 to include more current information developers to install base universal design City requirements in 2009, on useful websites relating to Universal Design. The brochure and features in all single-family developments of 20 Brochure and other related other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to or more homes. The Universal Design information will be posted at the the City's website and is also available at the public counter.In 2010, Ordinance is substantially the same D the City website and distributed at there was an update to the Ordinance to meet the current building Model Universal Design Local Ordinance public counters. code.This update took effect January 1,2011.In November 2012,the adopted by the California Department of brochure was reviewed and minor updates were made. Housing and Community Development. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 20:Reasonable Accommodation Revise Zoning Ordinance to amend Accomplishments:Zoning Ordinance Amendments were adopted by The City will adopt a formal ministerial process definition of"family"and to prepare the City Council in April 2011. for ersons with disabilities to seek relief from a formal reasonable development Continued A p to accommodation procedure within Appropriateness: This program is completed and is no the strict or literal application one year of the adoption of the longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. standards to enable them to enjoy their dwellings like other residents in Dublin, and to Housing Element. grant accommodations for new development of housing for persons with disabilities. Dublin's Zoning Ordinance defines a"family"as one or more persons occupying a dwelling and living as a single,non-profit housekeeping unit, as distinguished from a group occupying a hotel,club,fraternity or sorority house. A family includes any servants and four or fewer boarders. Based on court decisions, the definition of family should not distinguish between related and unrelated persons and should not impose limitations on the number of persons that may constitute a family. Because six or fewer disabled persons could be considered"boarders"of a licensed community care facility,the City's current definition of family Appendix B-12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation can be viewed as a potential constraint on housing for persons with disabilities. The City will revise its definition to eliminate references to the number of individuals that can comprise a single housekeeping unit. Program 21:Emergency Shelters Accomplishments:Zoning Ordinance Amendments were adopted by The Zoning Ordinance will be amended to the City Council in April 2011. permit emergency shelters with a ministerial Continued Appropriateness:This program is completed and is no permit within the M-1 zone district pursuant to longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. SS 2 enacted in 2007. The M-1 zone district covers approximately 180 acres on 67 parcels • Revise the Zoning Ordinance within in Dublin. The parcels are located along one year of the adoption of the transportation routes and are developed with a Housing Element to accommodate mix of light industrial, office, and warehousing Emergency Shelters consistent with uses. Adequate capacity exists either through SB 2. redevelopment of older uses or through adaptive reuse of older structures to accommodate at least one year-round emergency shatter to accommodate the City's estimated homeless population of 39. Program 22:Transitional Housing Revise the Zoning Ordinance to Accomplishments:Zoning Ordinance Amendments were adopted by The Zoning Ordinance will be amended to accommodate transitional housing the City Council in April 2011.The City will facilitate the development T the penance requirements for consistent with SB 2 within one of transitional housing for persons with disabilities and extremely low clarify he transitional housing tong ies. For transitional year of the adoption of the Housing income households using in-lieu fees. housing hat operates as group housing, Element. Continued Appropriateness: This ro ram is completed and is no 9 P 9 P 9. program P City's permitting requirements for community Facilitate the development of longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. care facilities apply, consistent with the transitional housing for persons Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services with disabilities and extremely low Act. For transitional housing that is regular income households using in-lieu housing, such housing will be permitted where fees. similar housing is otherwise permitted. Program 23:Supportive Housing Revise the Zoning Ordinance to Accomplishments:Zoning Ordinance Amendments were adopted by To facilitate and encourage the provision of accommodate supportive housing the City Council in April 2011.The City will facilitate the development housing Dublin, the Zoning consistent with SB 2 within one of supportive housing for persons with disabilities and extremely low supportive Ordinance will in amended clarify the year of the adoption of the Housing income households using in-lieu fees. Element. Appendix B-13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation permitting requirements for supportive housing facilities. For supportive housing that operates Facilitate the development of Continued Appropriateness: This program is completed and is no as group housing, the City's permitting supportive housing for persons with longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. requirements for community care facilities apply, disabilities and extremely low consistent with the Lanterman Developmental income households using in-lieu Disabilities Services Act.For supportive housing fees. that is regular housing, such housing will be permitted where similar housing is otherwise permitted. Program 24:Single Room Occupancy(SRO) Accomplishments:Zoning Ordinance Amendments were adopted by Units the City Council in April 2011.The City will encourage the inclusion of The Zoning Ordinance will be amended to SRO/efficiency units in large-scale developments to offer a range of housing choices. facilitate and encourage the provision of SROs consistent with AB 2634 enacted in 2007. Revise the Zoning Ordinance within Continued Appropriateness: This program is completed and is no SROs will be conditionally permitted in the C-2 one year of the adoption of the longer included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. (General Commercial)zone. Criteria that would Housing Element to accommodate be used to review Conditional Use Permit(CUP) Single Room Occupancy units applications for SROs pertain to performance standards. Potential conditions for approval of consistent with AB 2634. these facilities may include hours of operation, . Encourage the inclusion of parking, security, loading requirements, and SRO/efficiency units in large-scale management. Conditions would be similar to developments to offer a range of those for other similar uses in the same zones. housing choices. The required findings for approval of a CUP are stated in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance and are the same findings currently required for approval of large community care facilities. 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity Program 25:Equal Housing Opportunity . Provide referrals to appropriate Accomplishments:The City of Dublin website provides a link for fair The City of Dublin contracts through Alameda agencies for services. housing issues which directs interested readers to the Eden Council Count with ECHO Housing to investigate fair for Hope and Opportunity (ECHO) Housing and to the State of Y 9 9 • Distribute fair housing information California Consumer Affairs Office booklet"California Tenants:Guide housing complaints and provide fair housing to public locations. to Residential Tenants and Landlord's Rights and Responsibilities."In counseling and mediation services. The City's addition, the City contributes Community Support Grant funding to Housing Coordinator/Specialist is the point-of- • Post information on the City y Y pp g contact for fair housing complaints, information website. ECHO housing. Appendix B-14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation requests,and referrals to ECHO housing. Distribute information to real estate Fair housing information,in the form of brochures and pamphlets,has agents, rental property been made available at the City's public counter as well as links on owners/managers, and financial the City's web site to appropriate agencies.In addition,the City hosts institutions in Dublin. a booth at the City's annual St. Patrick's Day Festival where Eden Council for Hope and Opportunity (ECHO) Housing distributes Participate in Alameda County's information to the public about the services they offer including Impediments to Fair Housing Study tenant/landlord mediation. through the CDBG program. Fair housing information is made available to the public on the City's website. Through Alameda County, the City contracts with ECHO Housing to mediate fair housing issues for Dublin residents. Real estate agents, rental property owners/managers and financial institutions are directed to the City's website for information or are mailed information via the United States Postal Service.Throughout the year,Housing Staff meets with developers,real estate agents and landlords to discuss the City's housing programs,which may include information on the 211 County-wide social services hotline and ECHO Housing's services. In addition, during the annual rental monitoring site visits to properties with below market rate units, information is distributed to the property managers. In 2011,with the cities of Livermore and Pleasanton,the City of Dublin participated in the Human Services Needs Assessment Study,which identifies social service gaps in the Tri-Valley including housing issues. Dublin provided a representative on the consultant selection committee for the Study as well as participated in the community focus groups and gathering of information for the Study. In addition, information was provided to the consultants regarding the City of Dublin housing accomplishments in order to complete the Study. Several community events were held and a copy of the draft Study was placed on the City's website to solicit comments from service organizations,service consumers and the public at large in order to incorporate public feedback in the Study. The final draft was completed in January 2012 and the document has been posted on the City's website. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Appendix B-15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table 13-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program I Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation 6. Green Building Guidelines Program 26:Green Building Guidelines Develop green building guidelines Accomplishments: The City of Dublin adopted a Green Building The City Council has established as a high or ordinance within one year of Ordinance in April 2009. The Ordinance applies to all residential priority to enhance residential green building certification of the Housing projects over 20 units. In November 2010, the City adopted a new requirements to create a mandatory Green Element. Green Building Code. The Ordinance went into effect January 1, 2012. Building self-certification program as part of the Create brochures to describe permitting process. program requirements and methods A brochure was developed in April 2009 at the time the Green of compliance within six months of Building Ordinance was adopted. The brochure was revised in the adoption of the September 2009 to include various examples of Green Building. guidelines/ordinance. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. Program 27:Energy Conservation Implement applicable Waste Accomplishments: The City requires all developments to submit a The City will promote energy conservation Management and Building Code Waste Management Plan to meet the City's Construction and Debris through the following actions: regulations, provide Green Building Ordinance, which was adopted in January 2008. The Ordinance training to City staff, and distribute requires the diversion of at least 50%of construction waste away from • Continue to implement the Waste energy conservation information to landfills. In addition, the City Council adopted Green Building Management Authority's model the public. Guidelines for Civic Buildings to promote energy efficiency.The City ordinance on recycling of construction continues to implement the Guidelines on a project specific basis. waste. Informational brochures and pamphlets are available on the City's • Continue to implement state building website and at the public counter. standards(Title 24 of the California Code The City also offers subsidized permit fees on the installation of solar of Regulations) regarding energy roof panels for a variety of projects throughout the City of Dublin. efficiency in residential construction. The City's Environmental Specialist and Environmental Technician • Continue to provide on-site training for have also been Green Building Certified by the Build It Green City Building and Planning Staff on organization. Green building techniques. Continued Appropriateness: This program continues to be • Continue to review proposed appropriate and is included in the 2015-2023 Housing Element. developments for solar access, site design techniques, and use of landscaping that can increase energy efficiency and reduce lifetime energy costs without significantly increasing housing production costs. Appendix B-16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table B-1:Summary of Program Accomplishments Since 2007 Program Timeframe and Objectives Evaluation • Provide access to information on energy conservation and financial incentives(tax credit,utility rebates,etc.)through public information to be provided at the City's public counter,on the City's web site,at public libraries and community centers. Appendix B-17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix C: Technical Background Report 1. Housing Needs Assessment The Housing Needs Assessment begins with a brief history of Dublin, which is intended to provide community context and a foundation for the analysis of demographic and housing stock characteristics as well as various constraints to the provision of housing during the 2015-2023 Housing Element Cycle. The needs assessment identifies special housing needs among certain population groups, evaluates housing conditions, and provides other important information to support the goals, policies, and programs of the Housing Element to meet the needs of current and future Dublin residents. Brief History of Dublin Dublin has long been known as the "crossroads" of the Bay Area.' The City now sits at the crossroads of two major highways: Interstate 580 and Interstate-680. However, the significance of the "crossroads" dates back almost two hundred years when Dublin was the junction of two important stage routes - one from the Bay Area to Stockton and the other from Martinez to San Jose. The Alamilla Spring, located in the Dublin area, provided a place for travelers to change horses and freshen up before continuing their journey. Development of the Dublin area began in approximately 1822. Jose Maria Amador had been paid in land for his years of service as a Mexican soldier and as administrator of Mission San Jose. He received a land grant of 16,517 acres in the Amador- Livermore Valley and built several adobe homes and many small buildings used as shops. In 1852 Michael Murray and Jeremiah Fallon came to the area from Ireland and purchased 1,000 acres from Jose Amador. Shortly thereafter, the area began to grow; Alameda County was created from parts of Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties in 1853. Both Murray and Fallon served on the Alameda County Board of Supervisors. Townships were established the next year and Murray's name was chosen for the Dublin area. By 1877 the first schoolhouse in the Amador-Livermore Valley, along with a church, two hotels, Green's Store, a wagon and blacksmith shop, and a shoemaker's shop were constructed in Dublin. Mail was delivered to the Dougherty Station Hotel; thus, the area became known as Dougherty's Station. Dougherty Station grew slowly during the first half of the 201h Century with the first housing tracts built in the Dublin area in 1960, transforming the formerly rural community into a suburb. Dublin grew steadily from the early 1960s as both a residential and retail center and incorporated in 1982. ' Much of the historical information is derived from Virginia Bennett's book, "Dublin Reflections and Bits of Valley History"(1991). Copies of this book and other historical information can be found at the Dublin Library. Appendix C-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) A. Population Characteristics and Trends The following section describes and analyzes the various population characteristics and trends in Dublin that affect housing needs. Population Growth Dublin's population has grown steadily and dramatically over the past two decades. The number of residents in the City increased 29 percent between 1990 and 2000-(Table C-1) and grew by another 54 percent between 2000 and 2010. This growth has far outpaced the County's growth rate and that of most nearby jurisdictions. The Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) projects continued population growth in Dublin and surrounding communities through 2020. Most of the projected population growth in Alameda County is expected to occur through annexation and development of city spheres of influence and areas around unincorporated communities such as Castro Valley. Table C-1: Population Growth Po ulation % Change Jurisdiction 1990 2000 2010 2020 1990- 2000- 2010- 2000 2010 2020 Castro Valley 48,619 57,292 61,388 N/A 18% 7% N/A Dublin 23,229 29,973 46,036 54,200 29% 54% 18% Livermore 56,741 73,345 80,968 88,000 29% 10% 9% Pleasanton 50,553 63,654 70,285 76,800 16% 10% 9% San Ramon 35,303 44,722 72,148 76,800 27% 61% 6% Alameda 1,279,182 1,443,741 1,510,271 1,654,200 13% 5% 10% Count Source: Census, 1990, 2000,&2010; Association of Bay Area Governments(ABAG)—Projections,2013. Note:ABAG data not available for the unincorporated community of Castro Valley. Age Composition A population's age characteristics are also an important factor in evaluating housing and community development needs and determining the direction of future housing development. Typically, distinct lifestyles, family types and sizes, incomes, and housing preferences accompany different age groups. As people move through each stage of life, housing needs and preferences change. For example, young householders without children usually have different housing preferences than middle-age householders with children or senior householders living alone. Dublin's population is, as measured by the median age of its residents, slightly younger than most neighboring communities and the County as a whole. In 2010, Dublin's median age was 35.3 years, while the County's median age was 36.6. The City's proportion of young residents (22 percent) and seniors (seven percent) has remained fairly stable since 2000 and was the lowest among its neighbors in 2010, suggesting that a significant proportion of Dublin's population is of workforce age (Table C-2). Appendix C-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-2: Age Characteristics Jurisdiction Under 18 years Over 65 years Median Age 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 2010 Castro Valley 22% 24% 23% 15% 15% 13% 41.2 Dublin 23% 21% 22% 3% 5% 7% 35.3 Livermore 27% 28% 26% 7% 8% 10% 38.3 Pleasanton 26% 28% 27% 5% 8% 11% 40.5 San Ramon 27% 26% 30% 4% 6% 8% 37.1 Alameda County 24% 25% 23% 11% 10% 11% 36.6 Source:Census, 1990, 2000, &2010. The most noticeable shift in the City's age distribution was among working age residents (Figure C-1). Dublin's workforce is beginning to age. Since 1990, the proportion of 25 to 44 year olds dropped by eight percentage points, while the proportion of 45 to 64 year olds increased by eight percentage points. This could be an indication of the City's residents aging in place. Should this trend continue, Dublin's senior population could see a significant increase in the coming years. Figure C-1:Age Distribution, 1990-2010 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Under 5 5 to 17 18 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 65 & Up 1990 7% 15% 12% 46% 16% 3% ■2000 6% 21% 3% 44% 21% 5% ■2010 7% 15% 8% 38% 24916 70%/. Source: Census, 1990,2000, &2010. Appendix C-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Race and Ethnicity Household characteristics, income levels, and cultural backgrounds tend to vary by race and ethnicity, often affecting housing needs and preferences. Studies have suggested that different racial and ethnic groups also differ in their attitudes toward and/or tolerance for "housing problems" as defined by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), including overcrowding and housing cost burden.2 According to these studies, perceptions regarding housing density and overcrowding tend to vary between racial and ethnic groups. Especially within cultures that prefer to live with extended family members, household size and overcrowding also tend to increase. In general, Hispanic and Asian households exhibit a greater propensity than the White households for living in extended families. Since 1990, the City's population has grown significantly more diverse. Dublin's White population, which made up the majority of the City's residents in 1990, has decreased by 28 percent, while the Asian population has increased by 21 percent. As of 2010, approximately 44 percent of Dublin residents were White/Caucasian, 27 percent Asian/Pacific Islander, 15 percent Hispanic/Latino, nine percent Black/African-American, and five percent were identified as belonging to two or more or other races (Figure C-2). The 2000 Census allowed respondents to classify themselves as belonging to "Two or More" races for the first time. This change in methodology may explain most of the increase between 1990 and 2000 among residents who classified themselves as belonging to "Other" races. Figure C-2: Race and Ethnicity, 1990-2010 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% — 0% White/ Hispanic/ Black/African Asian/Pacific Other Caucasion Latino American Islander 1990 72% 10% 11% 6% 1% 1-2000, 62% 14% 10% 10% 4% ■20-101 44% 15% ( 9% 27% 5% € Source: Census, 1990, 2000, &2010. 2 Studies include the following: "The Determinants of Household Overcrowding and the Role of Immigration in Southern California" by S.Y. Choi (1993), "The Changing Problem of Overcrowding" by D. Myers, William Baer, and S.Y. Choi (1996); and "Immigration Cohorts and Residential Overcrowding in Southern California" by D. Myers and S.W. Lee(1996). Appendix C-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Dublin's population is more diverse compared to most nearby jurisdictions, with the exception of San Ramon, but not as diverse as Alameda County overall (Table C-3). Table C-3: Race/Ethnicity 2010 White/ Hispanic/ Black/ Asian/ Jurisdiction Caucasian Latino African Pacific Other American Islander Castro Valley 44% 15% 9% 27% 5% Dublin 62% 14% 10% 10% 4% Livermore 65% 21% 2% 9% 4% Pleasanton 61% 10% 2% 23% 4% San Ramon 49% 9% 3% 36% 5% Alameda County 1 34% 1 23% 1 12% 1 27% 1 5% Source: Census,2010. B. Employment Profile An assessment of community needs must consider the occupational profile of City residents. Incomes associated with different jobs and the number of workers in a household determines the type and size of housing a household can afford. In some cases, the types of jobs held by residents can affect housing needs and demand (such as in communities with military installations, college campuses, and seasonal agriculture). Occupation and Labor Participation The American Community Survey (ACS) provides information about employment in the City. As of 2011, Management, Business, Science, and Arts and Sales and Office occupations were the two largest occupational categories in Dublin (Table C-4). These categories accounted for 79 percent of the jobs held by the City's residents. By comparison, these occupations comprised approximately 68 percent of the jobs held by Alameda County residents. Table C-4: Employment Profile Occupations of Residents Dublin Alameda County Management, Business, Science, and Arts 10,935 51% 320,025 45% Service 2,444 11% 110,213 15% Sales and Office 6,050 28% 166,801 23% Natural Resources, Construction, and 1,002 5% 52,037 7% Maintenance Production, Transportation, and Material Moving 1 1088 1 5% 68,959 10% Management, Business, Science, and Arts 1 10,935 51% 320,025 45% Source:American Community Survey(ACS), 2007-2011. Employment growth typically leads to strong housing demand, while the reverse is true when employment contracts. The City adopted a Commercial Linkage Fee in 2005. The Commercial Linkage Fee is collected and deposited into the Inclusionary Zoning In-lieu Fee fund for the funding of affordable housing programs. As of April 1, 2014, the In-Lieu Fee fund has a balance Appendix C-5 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) of $7,013,816. The City will continue to implement its Commercial Linkage Fee program as a means of generating revenue to increase the supply of affordable housing in Dublin. Income by Occupation Management occupations were the highest paid occupations in the Alameda County region in the first quarter of 2013, while food preparation, service-related, and sales occupations were among the lowest paid occupations (Table C-5). In 2011, a larger proportion of Dublin residents were employed in higher paying occupations compared to the employed residents of Alameda County as a whole. This pattern would explain the City's higher median income (see Figure C-4 later). Table C-5: Average Salary by Occupation, Alameda County (Part of Oakland- Fremont-Hayward MD)-2013 Occupations Average Salary Management $128,829 Legal $114,903 Healthcare Practitioners and Technical $104,128 Architecture and Engineering $98,276 Computer and Mathematical $96,170 Life, Physical and Social Science $82,507 Business and Financial Operations $82,609 Construction and Extraction $62,371 Education, Training and Library $61,125 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports and Media $59,691 All Occupations $59,886 Protective Services $58,723 Community and Social Service $56,123 Installation, Maintenance and Repair $54,576 Sales and Related $45,801 Office and Administrative Support $43,231 Production $40,896 Transportation and Material Moving $40,687 Healthcare Support $37,118 Buildings and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance $33,095 Personal Care and Service $28,138 Farming, Fishing and Forestry $26,854 Food Preparation and Serving Related $22,940 Source: State Employment Development Department, 2013. Appendix C-6 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) C. Household Characteristics The Census defines a household as all persons who occupy a housing unit. This definition includes single persons living alone, families related through marriage or blood, and unrelated individuals living together. Persons living in retirement or convalescent homes, dormitories, or other group living situations are not considered households. Information on household characteristics is important to understand the growth and changing needs of a community. Household Type According to the Census, Dublin was home to 14,913 households in 2010. Of these households, 28 percent were single-person households and 11 percent were headed by seniors (Table C-6). Dublin's household characteristics were in many ways similar to characteristics of households in nearby jurisdictions. However, the City does have the lowest proportion of senior-headed households in the region. Table C-6: Household Characteristics Single- Senior- Families Single- Large Jurisdiction Person Headed with Parent Households Households Households Children Households Castro Valley 28% 22% 33% 9% 11% Dublin 21% 11% 37% 7% 10% Livermore 21% 18% 36% 8% 12% Pleasanton 19% 18% 41% 36% 10% San Ramon 19% 12% 46% 6% 11% Alameda County 26% 18% 31% 9% 13% Source:Census,2010. Different household types generally have different housing needs. Seniors or young adults often comprise the majority of the single-person households and tend to reside in apartment units, condominiums, or smaller single-family homes. Families often prefer larger single-family homes. Dublin's housing stock provides a range of unit types to meet the needs of all of its residents. Roughly, 54 percent of the City's housing stock is comprised of detached single- family units and approximately 33 percent are multi-family units, which include apartments and condominiums. Household Size Household size identifies sources of population growth and household overcrowding. A community's average household size will increase over time if there is a trend towards larger families. In communities where the population is aging, the average household size may decline. Dublin's average household size in 2010 (2.70) was equal to the average household size in the County (2.70) but less than most neighboring cities, with the exception of Castro Valley (2.69) (Figure C-3). Dublin's average household size has increased since the 2000 Census, as did the average household size in most neighboring jurisdictions. Appendix C-7 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-3: Average Household Size -2000-2010 2.85 2.80 2.75 — 2.70 -- b 2.65 -- -- — 2.60 2.55 2.50 — 2.45 — 2.40 Castro Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Alameda ' i Valley ; j _ Ramon j County i 2000 2.58 2.65 I 2.80 2.72 2.63 i 2.71 F-2010 2.69 2.70 2.76 2.77 2.85 2.70 Source: Census,2000&2010. Household Income Table C-7: Household Income Distribution Household income is an important consideration when evaluating housing and Household Income Dublin County community development needs because lower Less than$15,000 4% 10% income typically constrains a household's $15,000- $24,999 3% 8% ability to secure adequate housing or services. $25,000-$34,999 4% 7% While housing choices, such as tenure $35,000-$49,999 6% 11% (owning versus renting) and location of residences, are very much income-dependent, $50,000- $74,999 14% 16% household size and type often affect the $75,000-$99,999 12% 12% proportion of income that can be spent on $100,000-$149,999 28% 17% housing. $150,000 or more 29% 18% According to the 2007-2011 ACS, just four I Total 100% 100% percent of Dublin households earned incomes Source: American Community Survey (ACS), 2007- less than $15,000 in 2011, while three percent 2011. of households earned incomes between $15,000 and $24,999 (Table C-7). Approximately 10 percent of City households earned incomes between $25,000 and $49,999, while roughly 26 percent had incomes between $50,000 and $99,999. More than 57 percent of Dublin households earned $100,000 or more. Generally, Dublin households earned higher incomes than households countywide. The ACS estimated that the median household income in Dublin was $111,481 in 2011, while the median income for the County was estimated at $70,821 (Figure C-4). Appendix C-8 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-4: Median Household Income-2011 $140,000 $118,713 $124,014 $120,000 $100,000 $96,322 $82,370 $80,000 ��n Rya $60,000 $40,000 $20,000 $0 Castro Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Alameda Valley Ramon County Source:American Community Survey(ACS),2007-2011. The State and Federal government classify household income into various groups based upon its relationship to the County Area Median Income (AMI) and adjusted for household size. In 2010, approximately 83 percent of Dublin households earned moderate or above moderate incomes and only 17 percent of households earned lower incomes (Table C-8).4 Table C-8: Households by Income Category-2010 Income Category(%of County AMI) Households Percent Extremely Low(30% or less) 750 6% Very Low(31 to 50%) 695 5% Low(51 to 80%) 850 6% Moderate or Above (over 80%) 10,975 830X Total 13,270 100% Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS), based on American Community Survey(ACS), 2006-2010. 4 Data was obtained from the Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) prepared for HUD by the Census Bureau using 2006-2010 American Community Survey(ACS)data. Appendix C-9 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Overcrowding An overcrowded housing unit is defined as a unit occupied by more than one person per room.5 Overcrowding can result when there are not enough adequately sized units within a community, when high housing costs relative to income force too many individuals to share a housing unit than it can adequately accommodate, and/or when families reside in smaller units than they need to devote income to other necessities, such as food and health care. Overcrowding also tends to accelerate deterioration of housing. Therefore, maintaining a reasonable level of occupancy and alleviating overcrowding are important City goals to enhance quality of life for residents and aesthetic quality of neighborhoods. In 2011, overcrowding affected only two percent of Dublin households. By comparison, six percent of Alameda County households were living in overcrowded conditions. The incidence of overcrowding was equal among both renter- and owner-households (two percent each). Although these estimates show overcrowding by tenure to be near equal, proportions of housing units with more than three bedrooms by tenure suggests an inadequate supply of larger rental units. While 64 percent of occupied housing units in the City had more than three bedrooms (the minimum size considered large enough to avoid most overcrowding issues for large households), only 13 percent of these units were occupied by renters. Although a portion of overcrowding problems is likely attributable to a lack of larger housing units available for rent, the incidence of overcrowding is also influenced by other housing problems, such as overpayment. When faced with high housing, many families opt to take on additional roommates in order to share the cost burden or choose to reside in smaller units to save on costs. Overpayment (Cost Burden) State and federal standards for housing overpayment (cost burden) are based on an income-to- housing cost ratio of 30 percent and above. Households paying more than 30 percent of their income on housing have limited remaining income for other necessities. Above moderate income households generally are capable of paying a larger proportion of income for housing; therefore, estimates of housing overpayment generally focus on lower and moderate income households. In 2010, 42 percent of all Dublin households overpaid for housing. Furthermore, overpayment was more likely to affect homeowners rather than renters (47 percent versus 33 percent, respectively). Overpayment was generally concentrated among households at the lower income ranges and affected a larger proportion of renter-households with lower incomes than owner-households. For households earning moderate incomes or above, overpayment affected a larger percentage of homeowners than renters, which indicates that rental housing in Dublin is typically affordable to moderate income households (Figure C-5). 5 Based on the Census Bureau's definition of"room,"which excludes bathrooms, porches, balconies, foyers, halls, or half-rooms. See 2000 Census Long Form, question#37. Appendix C-10 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-5: Overpayment by Household Income 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% — 0% Extremely Moderate Very Low Low All Income (30% orvless) (31 to 50%) (51 to 80%) (over 80%) Levels ■Renter, 85% 97% 92% 15% 33% ■owner 1 68% 1 70% 75% 43% 47% Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development(HUD), Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS), based on American Community Survey(ACS), 2006-2010. D. Special Needs Populations Certain segments of the population may have more difficulty in finding decent, affordable housing due to their special needs. Special circumstances may be related to one's employment and income, family characteristics, disability, and household characteristics, among other factors. Consequently, some Dublin residents may experience a higher prevalence of housing overpayment, overcrowding, or other housing problems than other community members. "Special needs" groups include the following: senior households, single-parent households, large households, persons with disabilities (including persons with developmental disabilities), agricultural workers, military personnel, and homeless (Table C-9). This section provides a detailed discussion of the housing needs facing each particular group as well as programs and services available to address their housing needs. Appendix C-11 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-9: Special Needs Groups Number of Owners Renters Percent of Special Needs Group Households or Total Persons # % # % Households/ Person Households that Include at 2,239 _ -- 15% Least One Senior(Age 65+) Senior-Headed Households 1,680 1,258 75% 422 25% 1 11% Seniors Living Alone 578 362 63% 216 37% 4% Single-Parent Households 1,011 1,011 7% 46,476 9% 7% Female-Headed Households 697 __ __ __ 5% with Children Large Households 1,550 1,078 70% 472 30% 10% Persons with Disabilities(Age 2,104 5% 5+)'* Agricultural Workers 47 -- -- -- __ <1% Military Personnel 236 -- -- -- -- <1% Homeless 14 -- -- __ -_ <1% Source: Census, 2010; American Community Survey (ACS), 2009-2011 and 2007-2011; and Alameda County Housing and Community Development. Notes: *=2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS. **=2010 Census data not available. Estimate is from the 2007-2011 ACS. Estimate is for persons 5 years of age and over. ***=2013 Alameda Countywide Homeless Count and Survey Report,2013. Senior Households The population over 65 years of age is considered senior. Many senior households have special housing needs due to their limited and/or fixed incomes, health care costs, and disabilities. In 2010, seniors comprised seven percent of all Dublin residents and approximately 11 percent of Dublin households were headed by seniors. Of these senior-headed households, the majority (75 percent) owned their homes, while the remainder (25 percent) rented their homes. Approximately 47 percent of senior-headed households overpaid for their housing. Generally, this overpayment was more likely to affect senior renters rather than senior homeowners. Specifically, 42 percent of senior homeowners overpaid, while 58 percent of senior renters overpaid. Aside from overpayment problems faced by seniors due to their relatively fixed incomes, many seniors are faced with various disabilities. Roughly, 31 percent of Dublin's senior population was listed as having one or more disabilities in 2011 by the ACS. Among these disabilities, the most common were ambulatory, hearing, and independent living difficulties. According to 2-1-1 Alameda County client statistics, householders age 62 and older represented approximately 14 percent of all Dublin callers during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.6 Requests for 6 Fiscal Year 3012-2013 client statistics provided by Eden Information and Referral,Inc. (Eden I&R),April 2014.The 3-1-1 Alameda County program is a free, non-emergencN-, confidential, 3-digit phone number and service that provides easy-access to housing information, and critical health and human services. The program is operated 24 hours a dav, 7 days a week with multi-lingual capabilities. Appendix C-12 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) housing and shelter referrals were the most prevalent among all callers, including assistance with senior housing information and referral. Amon other top requests were for information on public assistance programs and legal services, including Medicaid and elder law. Resources The special needs of seniors can be met through a range of services, including congregate care, rent subsides, shared housing, and housing rehabilitation assistance. According to Community Care Licensing Division records, nine community care facilities for the elderly are located in Dublin with a total capacity to serve 54 persons. Affordable housing opportunities located in the City to meet the housing needs of the elderly include: • Carlow Court Senior Apartments at Emerald Vista—49 below market units • Pine and Cedar Groves at Dublin Ranch Senior Apartments—292 below market units • Wicklow Square Senior Apartments—53 below market units Senior residents can benefit from various classes, activities, and programs offered at the Dublin Senior Center. The Senior Center also provides a variety of free health and informational services, including health management classes, health and memory screenings, and health insurance counseling and advocacy. In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance after its adoption in December 2007 and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. In 2010, there was an update to the Ordinance to meet the current building code and which took effect January 1, 2011. Single-Parent Households Single-parent households require special consideration and assistance because of their greater need for day care, health care, and other facilities. Female-headed single-parent households face greater financial difficulties because they often do not have the same earning power as their male counterparts, thus limiting housing availability for this group. Approximately seven percent of Dublin households were headed by single parents in 2010; the large majority of which were headed by females (69 percent). According to the 2007-2011 ACS, 16 percent of female headed single-parent households in Dublin had incomes below the poverty level. Single mother with minor children households represented nearly 29 percent of all Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.6 Among top caller needs were referral requests for low income/subsidized rental housing, public assistance program, legal services, information services, and individual and family support services. Appendix C-13 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Resources Limited household income constrains the ability of these households to afford adequate housing and provide for childcare, health care, and other necessities. Finding adequate and affordable childcare is a pressing issue for many families with children. While the City has no specific housing programs targeted at single-parent households, the City's overall efforts to expand affordable housing opportunities will help meet the needs of single-parent households. The City also offers a Youth Fee Assistance Program to enable households with limited income to participate in City-sponsored recreation programs that may be beneficial to single-parent households. Youth programs that are offered include various preschool, elementary and middle school after school programs, and children and teen recreation and educational classes. In February 2010, the City amended the Zoning Ordinance to streamline the approval of Large Family Day Care Homes and in February 2014 amended the Zoning Ordinance to streamline the approval of Day Care Centers. Both Zoning Ordinance amendments reduce the cost and time associated with establishing child care facilities in the City. Large Households Large households (households with five or more members) are identified as a group with special housing needs because of the limited availability of adequately sized, affordable housing units. Large households with lower incomes frequently occupy smaller and more affordable dwelling units to offset potential cost burden, which in turn can accelerate unit deterioration. Approximately 10 percent of Dublin households could be classified as large households in 2010. Over 30 percent of these households rented their homes. As previously discussed, the availability of adequately sized, affordable rental units in Dublin is limited. About 64 percent of occupied housing units in the City had more than three bedrooms (adequate size for larger households) in 2011; however, only a small portion of these units (13 percent) were occupied by renters. 2-11 Alameda County client statistics indicate that approximately seven percent of Dublin callers during Fiscal Year 2012-2013 were large households.6 Referral requests for rental and utility payment assistance, food stamps, and eviction prevention assistance were highly prevalent among all callers. Resources The City's large households can benefit from the housing programs and services that are available to all of the City's lower and moderate income households, such as the Housing Choice Voucher program, Commercial Linkage Fee Program, Inclusionary Zoning Program, and Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Program. Such efforts help reduce overcrowding and overpayment among lower and moderate income households, and help reduce the number of large households formed by families or individuals sharing housing arrangements. Persons with Disabilities Disability is a physical or mental condition that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Physical disabilities can hinder access to housing units of conventional design, as well as limit the ability to earn incomes sufficient to avoid housing cost burden. The ACS Appendix C-14 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) estimates that five percent of Dublin residents over five years of age had a disability in 2011. The ACS also tallied the number of disabilities by type for residents with one or more disabilities. Among the disabilities tallied, ambulatory difficulties were the most prevalent, especially among the City's senior residents. Hearing, cognitive, and independent living difficulties were also common (Table C-10). Table C-10: Disability Status Disabilities Tallied Disability by Age and Type Age 5 to 17 Age 18 to 64 Age 65+ Total With a hearing difficulty 13% 32% 48% 38% With a vision difficulty 24% 18% 21% 20% With a cognitive difficulty 88% 31% 27% 34% With an ambulatory difficulty 13% 39% 57% 45% With a self-care difficulty 36% 19% 17% 19% With an independent living difficulty -- 37% 30% 31% Total Persons with Disabilities 164 949 991 2,104 Source:American Community Survey(ACS),2009-2011. Notes: 1. Tallied only for persons five years and over. 2. Persons may have multiple disabilities. Four factors— affordability, design, location and discrimination — can limit the supply of housing available to households of persons with disabilities. The most obvious housing need for persons with disabilities is housing that is or can be adapted to their needs. Most single-family homes are inaccessible to people with mobility and sensory limitations. Housing may not be adaptable to widened doorways and hallways, access ramps, larger bathrooms, lowered countertops and other features necessary for accessibility. The cost of retrofitting a home often makes homeownership cost-prohibitive, even .for individuals or families who could otherwise afford a home. Furthermore, some providers of basic homebuying services do not have offices or materials that are accessible to people with mobility, visual or hearing impairments. Households that had a household member with a disability represented nearly 34 percent of all Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013.6 Referral requests for help with Medicaid and other medical information, and in home assistance were among the top needs of all callers. Persons with Developmental Disabilities A recent change in State law requires that the Housing Element discuss the housing needs of persons with developmental disabilities. As defined by the Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, "developmental disability" means "a disability that originates before an individual attains age 18 years, continues, or can be expected to continue, indefinitely, and constitutes a substantial disability for that individual. As defined by the Director of Developmental Services, in consultation with the Superintendent of Public Instruction, this term shall include mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and autism. This term shall also include disabling conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for individuals with mental retardation, but shall not include other handicapping conditions that are solely physical in nature." This definition also reflects the Appendix C-15 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) individual's need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic services, individualized supports, or other forms of assistance that are of lifelong or extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated. The State Department of Developmental Services (DDS) currently provides community based services to approximately 243,000 persons with developmental disabilities and their families through a statewide system of 21 regional centers, four developmental centers, and two community-based facilities. The Regional Center of the East Bay (RCEB) is one of 21 regional centers in the State of California that provides point of entry to services for people with developmental disabilities. The RCEB is charged by the State of California with the care of people with developmental disabilities, defined as those with severe, life-long disabilities attributable to mental and/or physical impairments. The RCEB is a private, non-profit community agency that contracts with local businesses to offer a wide range of services to individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. The following information from Area Board 5 of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities provides a closer look at the disabled population. Data shown in Table C-11 estimates the number of Dublin individuals with developmental disabilities, including both RCEB consumers and those unaffiliated with the RCEB. Table C-11: Developmentally Disabled Residents, by Age, for Dublin, 2014 0-14 15-22 23-54 55-65 65+Years Total Years Years Years Years Dublin Total 188 128 174 28 2 520 Source: State Council on Developmental Disabilities,Area Board 5,2014. Many developmentally disabled persons can live and work independently within a conventional housing environment. More severely disabled individuals require a group living environment where supervision is provided. The most severely affected individuals may require an institutional environment where medical attention and physical therapy are provided. Because developmental disabilities exist before adulthood, the first issue in supportive housing for the developmentally disabled is the transition from the person's living situation as a child to an appropriate level of independence as an adult. Resources Services for persons with disabilities are typically provided by both public and private agencies. State and Federal legislation regulate the accessibility and adaptability of new or rehabilitated multi-family apartment complexes to ensure accommodation for individuals with limited physical mobility. As mentioned previously, in 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base universal design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. Appendix C-16 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing options for persons with disabilities also include various community care facilities. Combined, these facilities offer a capacity of 88 beds. These include: • Six Adult Residential Care facilities—34 beds total • Nine Residential Care for the Elderly facilities—54 beds total Agricultural Workers Agricultural workers are traditionally defined as persons whose primary incomes are earned through permanent or seasonal agricultural labor. Permanent farm laborers work in the fields, processing plants, or support activities on a generally year-round basis. When workload increases during harvest periods, the labor force is supplemented by seasonal labor, often supplied by a labor contractor. For some crops, farms may employ migrant workers, defined as those whose travel distance to work prevents them from returning to their primary residence every evening. Determining the true size of the agricultural labor force is problematic. For instance, government agencies that track farm labor do not consistently define farm-workers (e.g. field laborers versus workers in processing plants), length of employment (e.g. permanent or seasonal), or place of work (e.g. the location of the business or field). Further limiting the ability to ascertain the number of agricultural workers within Dublin is the limited data available on the City due to its relatively small size. Therefore, the 2007-2011 ACS is the sole source of information that can be referenced. According to the ACS, only 47 Dublin residents (less than one percent of the City's residents) were employed the in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining industry. Resources Dublin is an urbanized community with no undeveloped parcels zoned for agricultural use. Because a negligible portion of community residents are employed in farming, fishing, and forestry occupations and there is little potential for this occupational category to expand within Dublin, no housing programs or policies specifically targeted at farm-workers are needed. Military Personnel The Camp Parks Reserve Forces Training Area is located in Dublin. Camp Parks supports some 20,000 northern California Army Reserve and California National Guard Soldiers from an estimated 250 reserve component units. Many of these units, however, train at Camp Parks for just two weeks each summer and very few reside in the City. According to the 2007-2011, only 236 Dublin residents (0.7 percent) served in the Armed Forces full-time. Resources Because most of the military personnel that use Camp Parks are reservists, few live in Dublin. In 2005, the military constructed 114 homes on the base for military personnel. Because a negligible portion of community residents serve in the Armed Forces full-time, no housing programs or policies specifically targeted at military personnel are needed. Homeless The Alameda Countywide Homeless Continuum of Care Council (HCCC) relies on a "community-defined" definition of homeless; one that includes the HUD-defined chronic Appendix C-17 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) homeless population as a subset of the County's overall homeless population. Community- defined homelessness includes people staying in emergency shelters or transitional housing, living on the street or in a car, and people who will lose their housing within a month and have nowhere to go. Assessing a region's homeless population is difficult because of the transient nature of the population. As many as 16,000 people are estimated to be homeless during the course of a year in Alameda County, and more than 5,000 are homeless on any given night. According to the 2013 count, 4,264 people were homeless in Alameda County on January 29, 2013. The homeless population in Dublin was estimated at 14 persons. Based on informal interviews with patrol personnel, the Police estimated that depending on the time of year and weather, the City has a very small amount of homeless persons at a given time. During the winter months the homeless population ranges from one to two persons, if any at all. While during the summer months the homeless population may increase slightly to between two and three persons. Police typically make every effort possible to redirect homeless persons they encounter to shelters, VA sponsored counseling, or various other resources in the County. Over three-quarters (78 percent) of Dublin callers to 2-1-1 Alameda County during Fiscal Year 2012-2013 were extremely low income household S.6 Referral requests for housing and shelter were highly prevalent among all callers. Specifically, there were a high number of requests for emergency shelter, transitional housing/shelter, and homeless permanent supportive housing. Requests were also highly prevalent for homeless prevention referrals, including access to low income/subsidized rental housing, rental and utility payment assistance, and eviction prevention assistance, Resources Emergency, transitional, and permanent supportive housing is available in Alameda County for people who are homeless, living with HIV/AIDS, and/or mentally ill. Unlike affordable housing in general, housing that is dedicated to one of these populations typically connects with services. The service connection may range from a service coordinator, who can make referrals to services off-site, up to more intensive on-site services. The following provides an overview of Countywide housing resources available to serve the County's homeless population: • Emergency Shelters: An emergency shelter provides overnight shelter and fulfills a client's basic needs (i.e. food, clothing, and medical care) either on site or through off- site services. The permitted length of stay can vary from one day at a time to three months. • Transitional Housing: This type of facility provides housing for up to two years. Residents of transitional housing are usually connected to supportive services designed to assist the homeless in achieving greater economic independence and a permanent, stable living situation. • Supportive Housing: Permanent supportive housing is service-enriched and linked with on-going supportive services (on-site or off-site) allowing formerly homeless clients to live at the facility on an indefinite basis. Support services can encompass a wide range of activities, such as case management, service coordination (assessing needs Appendix C-18 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) and coordinating services), health and mental health care, substance abuse treatment, employment counseling and training, and money management. Services are usually tailored to the needs of the housed individuals, and may be delivered on-site or through linkages to community-based agencies. Approximately 40 agencies throughout the County provide emergency shelter or transitional housing services for both individuals and families. There are no emergency shelters or transitional housing providers located in Dublin. Service agencies located in the nearby City of Livermore, including Shepherd's Gate, Tri-Valley Haven and Livermore Homeless Refuge, provide emergency shelter and transitional housing services for homeless in need. Approximately 26 supportive housing facilities serving both individuals and families are available throughout the County. Supportive housing services are not available in Dublin. The Tri-City Health Center provides Shelter Plus Care supportive housing services to its clients and has a location in nearby Livermore." Homelessness is a regional issue that requires the coordination among regional agencies. "EveryOne Home" is Alameda County's road map for ending homelessness. It represents an opportunity to participate in a model of long-term solutions and innovative countywide strategies. Emphasizing a coordinated, efficient regional response to a regional problem will make the best use of the county's resources while building capacity to attract funding from federal, state and philanthropic sources. EveryOne Home envisions the creation of a housing- and-services system that partners with consumers, families and advocates; provides appropriate services in a timely fashion to all in need; and ensures that individuals and families are safely, supportively and permanently housed. The City adopted EveryOne Home in August 2008. The City will continue to support the Alameda County HCCC and agencies and organizations that address the problem of homelessness throughout the region. Dublin provided funding to the Alameda Countywide HCCC for development of a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). The HMIS is intended to collect and report information about the homeless population and its patterns of service utilization. In addition, the City of Dublin continues to support the Tri-Valley Haven's Domestic Violence Shelter and Homeless Shelter through Community Development Block Grant funds. The City will continue to analyze and address impediments to the provision of housing for the homeless and near homeless by facilitating and encouraging the development of affordable housing and facilities for the homeless, including emergency shelters, transitional housing, single room occupancy units, and permanent supportive housing. In April 2011, the Dublin Zoning Ordinance was amended to include provisions for emergency shelters, transitional housing, supportive housing, single room occupancy housing. 8 2-1-1 Alameda County Online Services Directory, Eden I & R, Inc., January 2014. Appendix C-19 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) E. Housinq Stock Characteristics The characteristics of the housing stock, including growth, type, age and condition, tenure, vacancy rates, costs, and affordability are important in determining the housing needs for the community. This section details Dublin's housing stock characteristics in an attempt to identify how well the current housing stock meets the needs of current and future residents of the City. Housing Unit Growth and Type Dublin has experienced relatively strong housing growth since 1990. The City's housing stock grew from 6,992 units in 1990 to an estimated 15,782 units in 2010, an increase of approximately 126 percent (Table C-12). Dublin's growth since 1990 has far outpaced the growth observed in all other nearby communities and the County. Table C-12: Housing Stock Growth Jurisdiction #of Units in #of Units in #of Units in % Increase % Increase 1990 2000 2010 1990-2000 2000-10 Castro Valley 19,682 22,003 23,392 12% 6% Dublin 6,992 9,872 15,782 41% 60% Livermore 21,489 26,610 30,342 24% 14% Pleasanton 1 19,356 23,968 1 26,053 1 24% 1 9% San Ramon 13,531 17,552 26,222 30% 49% Alameda County 504,109 540,183 582,549 7% 8% Source: Census 1990, 2000, &2010. Dublin maintains a diverse housing stock. In 2013, single-family homes comprised 66 percent of the housing stock, while multi-family units comprised 33 percent. Less than one percent of the City's housing was comprised of mobile homes (Table C-13). Compared to the County, Dublin's housing stock has a larger proportion of single-family housing and a smaller proportion of multi-family structures. Table C-13: Housing Stock Composition: 2013 Housing Type Dublin County #of Units % of Total #of Units % of Total Single-Family 9,472 54% 311,246 53% Detached Single-Family 2,070 12% 44,965 8% Attached Multifamily 2-4 Units 596 3% 65,581 11% Multifamily 5+ Units 5,324 30% 156,845 27% Mobile Homes/Other 54 <1% 7,837 1% Total Units 17,516 100% 586,474 100% Source: California Department of Finance, 2013. Appendix C-20 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Age and Condition Housing that is 30 years or older is assumed to require some rehabilitation. Electrical capacity, kitchen features, and roofs usually need updating if no prior replacement work has occurred. Dublin's housing stock is younger than the County's overall, with just 29 percent of the City's housing constructed prior to 1980. By contrast, about 74 percent of the County's housing stock is more than 30 years old (constructed prior to 1980) (Figure C-6 ). Figure C-6:Year Structure Built 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% — 15% 10% — 5% 0% 2000 or 1990 to 1980 to 1970 to 1960 to 1940 to Pre- Later 1999 1989 1979 1969 1959 1939 ®Dublin 38% 16% 17% 7% 19% 2% 1 ■Alameda County, 7% 8% 11% 16% 14% 23% 21 Source:American Community Survey(ACS),2007-2011. Based on the age of the structure alone, it is estimated that approximately one in four housing units in the City may require maintenance or rehabilitation within the Housing Element planning period. However, the actual proportion of Dublin housing units in need of rehabilitation or replacement is likely much lower as high property values in Dublin, even for older homes, creates a market incentive for most property owners to diligently maintain their dwelling units. From 2007-2013, 838 residential re-roof permits were issued by the Building Division, which reflects a high rate of on-going maintenance and repair by homeowners. For these reasons, the City estimates that less than two percent of the housing stock (<400 units) is in need of rehabilitation and less than one percent is in need of replacement (<150 units). Even this estimate may be high as substandard housing or paint issues led to only 21 code violations of the 3,104 residential code enforcement cases opened since 2008. The Alameda County Community Development Agency administers the Minor and Major Home Improvement Programs for the City of Dublin. Low-interest loans up to $1,500 are available to lower income households through the Minor Home Improvement Program. While the Major Home Improvement Program provides loans up to $60,000 at a three percent annual percentage rate for qualified lower income households. Since 2007, on behalf of the City, Alameda County administered Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds and provided 12 minor home repairs, eight paint grants, 11 rehabilitation grants, and five Appendix C-21 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) accessibility grants in Dublin. The City will continue to support the Alameda County Community Development Agency to implement the Minor and Major Home Improvement Program. Appendix C-22 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Tenure The tenure distribution of a community's housing stock (owner-occupied versus renter-occupied) Table C-14: Housing Tenure influences several aspects of the local housing market. Residential stability is influenced by tenure, Jurisdiction % Owner- % Renter- with ownership housing evidencing a much lower Occupied Occupied turnover rate than rental housing. In addition, housing Castro Valley 69% 31% problems, such as overpayment (cost burden), while Dublin 63% 37% faced by many households, is far more prevalent Livermore 70% 30% among renters. Tenure preferences are primarily Pleasanton 71% 29% related to household income, composition, and age of San Ramon 71% 29% the householder. In 2010, 63 percent of Dublin Alameda residents owned the housing units they occupied, County 53% 47% while 37 percent rented their homes (Table C-14). This rate of homeownership is the lowest among Source: Census,2010. neighboring communities, but still noticeably higher than the County's homeownership rate. On average, owner-households were larger than renter-households in 2010 (Table C-15). Among those who owned their homes, 52 percent were households with more than three persons, while just 38 percent of renter-households were comprised of three or more persons. Table C-15: Tenure by Household Size Households Owner- Renter- Occupied Occupied 1 person 17% 30% 2 person 31% 33% 3 person 20% 17% 4 person 21% 12% 5+person 11% 9% Average household 2.86 2.42 size Source: Census,2010. The City values its rental housing stock and recognizes its importance for meeting the diverse housing needs of the community. In 2005, the City Council passed a Condominium Conversion Ordinance to preserve the existing rental housing stock. The Ordinance establishes an annual maximum number of rental apartment units that can be converted to seven percent of the total number of multi-family units in developments of 21 or more rental units. The Ordinance also establishes tenant notification and relocation assistance requirements, limits rent increases once a notice of intent to convert has been filed, and gives tenants the right to purchase units. New condominium conversions are also subject to the City's Inclusionary Zoning Regulations. The City continues to monitor conversion activities annually. There have been no condominium conversions in the City since 2007. Appendix C-23 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Vacancy A certain number of vacant units are needed to moderate the cost of housing, allow sufficient choice for residents, and provide an incentive for unit upkeep and repair. Specifically, vacancy rates of approximately two percent for ownership housing and five to six percent for rental housing are generally considered optimal by housing professionals to balance demand and supply for housing. According to the Census, the overall vacancy rate in Dublin was 5.5 percent in 2010. Specifically, the vacancy rate for ownership housing was 2.5 percent in 2010, while the rental vacancy rate was five percent. Both the ownership and rental vacancy rates for the City were well within the optimal ranges, indicating that the City's housing stock is adequately meeting overall demand. However, affordable housing options in the City may still be in short supply. Housing Costs and Affordability The cost of housing is directly related to the extent of housing problems in a community. If housing costs are relatively high in comparison to household income, there will be a correspondingly higher prevalence of housing overpayment and overcrowding. This section summarizes the cost and affordability of the housing stock to Dublin residents. Homeownership Market According to DataQuick, a company that collects real estate data nationwide, median home prices in Dublin and nearby communities were well above the countywide median price of $485,000 (Figure C-7). Dublin's median sales price during 2013 was $678,000, approximately 28 percent higher than the County's. Home prices in the City have continued to rise steadily in recent years. Median sales prices have increased over 20 percent annually since 2011 (Table C-16). Most neighboring jurisdictions experienced similar increases in home prices, including Livermore, San Ramon, and Pleasanton. Castro Valley experienced the largest change in median sales price (28 percent) of neighboring jurisdictions between 2012 and 2013, but all were outpaced by the increase that occurred in the County as a whole (33 percent). Asking prices for single-family homes and condominiums in Dublin were also collected from the Zillow online real estate database in an effort to understand Dublin's recent real estate market. The Zillow database listed 31 single-family detached homes and 21 attached homes for sale in February 2014 (Table C-17). The median asking price for a unit was $569,000, with an overall range of $245,000 to $1,737,736. Detached units were priced higher ($709,450 median) than attached units ($419,000 median). Appendix C-24 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-7: Median Home Sales Price (2013) $800,000 $750,000 $700,000 $678,000 $600,000 $534,500 $505,000 $500,000 Alameda County: $485,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 - $100,000 $0 Castro Valley Dublin Livermore Pleasanton San Ramon Source: DQNews.com,accessed on January 29,2014. Table C-16: Median Home Sales Prices: 2011-2013 Jurisdiction 2011 2012 2013 % Change %Change 2011-2012 2012-2013 Castro Valley $390,000 $418,000 $534,500 7% 28% Dublin $440,000 $549,000 $678,000 25% 23% Livermore $378,000 $415,000 $505,000 10% 22% Pleasanton $637,000 $635,000 $750,000 <-11% 18% San Ramon $593,000 $623,000 $770,000 5% 24% Alameda County $338,000 $365,000 $485,000 8% 33% Source: DQNews.com, accessed on February 2014. Appendix C-25 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-17: Home Asking Prices: February 2014 Number Median Unit Type for Sale Asking Price Range Asking Price Detached Homes 31 $415,000 to$1,737,736 $709,450 2-Bedroom 4 $415,000 to$469,000 $453,500 3-Bedroom 6 $549,900 to$830,000 $652,500 4-Bedroom 10 $455,000 to$819,000 $643,750 5+ Bedroom 11 $689,900 to$1,737,736 $1,184,526 Attached Homes 21 $245,000 to$790,000 $419,000 1-Bedroom 8 $245,000 to$368,000 $301,295 2-Bedroom 8 $289,500 to$549,000 $449,450 3+-Bedroom 5 $475,000 to$790,000 $692,000 All Listings 52 $245,000 to$1,737,736 $569,000 Source:Zillow.com, February, 2014. Rental Market The website www.rent.com reported rental price information for 13 apartment complexes within the City of Dublin (Table C-18). In February 2014, only one community offered studio apartments, where available units rented for $1,692 to $1,722. One-bedroom units rented for $1,285 to $2,315 and, as expected, larger units were more expensive. Two-bedroom units were offered from $1,675 to $2,877, while three-bedroom units ranged from $2,165 to $ 3,743 per month. Table C-18: Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 Apartment Complex Rental Price Range Archstone Emerald Park One-Bedroom $1,745 to$1,930 Two-Bedroom $2,210 to$2,437 Three-Bedroom $2,520 to$2,685 Avalon/Eclipse Dublin Station Studio $1,692 to$1,722 One-Bedroom $1,818 to$2,300 Two-Bedroom $2,363 to$2,877 Three-Bedroom $3,227 to$3,743 Connolly Station One-Bedroom $1,738 to$1,838 Two-Bedroom $2,317 to$2,452 Cotton Wood Apartments One-Bedroom $1,470 to$1,560 Two-Bedroom $1,775 to$1,950 Appendix C-26 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-18: Apartment Rental Rates: February 2014 Apartment Complex I Rental Price Range Dublin Ranch Senior Community One-Bedroom $1,425 to$1,625 Two-Bedroom $1,675 to$1,825 Eaves Dublin Studio $1,285 to$1,760 One-Bedroom $1,815 to$2,720 Two-Bedroom $2,165 to$2,265 Emerald Park One-Bedroom $1,705 to$2,110 Two-Bedroom $2,185 to$2,590 Three-Bedroom $2,845 Ironhorse Trail One-Bedroom $1,641 to$1,841 Two-Bedroom $2,083 to$2,323 Three-Bedroom $2,761 to$2,776 Oak Grove at Dublin Ranch One-Bedroom $1,525 to$1,725 Two-Bedroom $1,920 to$2,025 Three-Bedroom $2,270 Park Sierra One-Bedroom $1,674 to$2,081 Two-Bedroom $2,014 to$2,399 The Springs One-Bedroom $1620 to$1,699 Two-Bedroom $1,899 to$2,099 Tralee Apartments One-Bedroom $1,925 to$2,300 Two-Bedroom $2,425 to$2,800 Three-Bedroom $3,350 to$3,450 Waterford Place One-Bedroom $1,930 to$2,315 Two-Bedroom $2,335 to$2,635 Source: www.rent.com, accessed on January 20,2014. Note: This table does not reflect a comprehensive listing of apartment communities in Dublin. Appendix C-27 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Housing Affordability by Household Income Housing affordability can be inferred by comparing the cost of renting or owning a home in the City with the maximum affordable housing costs for households at different income levels. Taken together, this information can generally show who can afford what size and type of housing and indicate the type of households most likely to experience overcrowding and overpayment. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) conducts annual household income surveys nationwide to determine a household's eligibility for federal housing assistance. Based on this survey, the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) developed income limits that can be used to determine the maximum price that could be affordable to households in the upper range of their respective income category. Households in the lower end of each category can afford less by comparison than those at the upper end. The maximum affordable home and rental prices for residents of Alameda County are shown in Table C-19. The market-affordability of Dublin's housing stock for each income group is discussed below. Extremely Low and Very Low Income Households Extremely low income households earn 30 percent or less of the Area Median Income (AMI). Generally, the maximum affordable rental payment ranges from $373 per month for a one- person household to $522 per month for a family of five (Table C-19). The maximum affordable home purchase price for extremely low income households ranges from $63,071 for a one- person household to $78,664 for a five-person household. Very low-income households are classified as those earning 50 percent or less of the AMI. The maximum affordable rental payment ranges from $701 per month for a one-person household to $1,027 per month for a family of five (Table C-19). The maximum affordable home purchase price for very low income households ranges from $124,048 for a one-person household to $172,689 for a five person household. Based on the rental data presented in Table C-18, extremely low and very low income households of all sizes would be unlikely to secure adequately sized and affordable rental housing in Dublin. In addition, according to the Zillow real estate database, no houses of adequate size were listed for sale at prices affordable to these households in February 2014 (Table C-17). Low Income Households Low income households earn 51 to 80 percent of the County AMI. The maximum home price a low income household can afford ranges from $192,006 for a one-person household to $277,653 for a five-person family. Affordable rental rates for low-income households would range from $1,066 for a one-person household to $1,590 for a five-person household. Based upon a review of homes listed for sale in February 2014, low-income households would have great difficulty purchasing an adequately sized home at an affordable price (Table C-17). However, these households do stand a better chance of securing an adequately sized affordable rental unit (Table C-18). Because the City has a limited number of apartment complexes offering three-bedroom units, though, larger low income households will still likely find it hard to find affordable housing options that can comfortably accommodate them. Appendix C-28 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Moderate Income Households Moderate income households earn up to 120 percent of the County AMI. The maximum affordable home price for moderate income households ranges from $398,170 for a one-person household to $595,801 for a family of five. A moderate income household can afford rental rates of$1,846 to $2,794 per month depending on household size. Based on these figures and the real estate data presented in Table C-18, moderate income households could afford many of the attached homes and a limited number of the detached homes listed for sale in February 2014. These households would also be able to afford a wide range of the available rental units in Dublin. Appendix C-29 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-19: Housing Affordability Matrix Alameda County Affordable Housing Cost Maximum (including Utilities, Taxes & Insurance Annual Income (Ildi g Utilities, Affordable Price Limits Taxes& Insurance Renters I Owners Renters Owners Taxes& Rent Sale Ins. Extremely Low Income(0-30%AMI) 1-Person $19,650 $491 $491 $118 $122 $98 $373 $63,071 2-Person $22,450 $561 $561 $135 $143 $112 $426 $71,217 3-Person $25,250 $631 $631 $165 $179 $126 $466 $75,872 4 Person $28,050 $701 $701 $211 $227 $140 $490 $77,733 5 Person $30,300 $758 $758 $236 $268 $152 $522 $78,664 Very Low Income(31-50%AMI) 1-Person $32,750 $819 $819 $118 $122 $164 $1,066 $124,048 2-Person $37,400 $935 $935 $135 $143 $187 $1,218 $140,805 3-Person $42,100 $1,053 $1,053 $165 $179 $211 $1,356 $154,303 4-Person $46,750 $1,169 $1,169 $211 $227 $234 $1,479 $164,776 5-Person $50,500 $1,263 $1,263 $236 $268 $253 $1,590 $172,689 Low Income(51-80%AMI) 1-Person $47,350 $1,184 $1,184 $118 $122 $237 $1,041 $192,006 2-Person $54,100 $1,353 $1,353 $135 $143 $271 $1,190 $218,538 3-Person $60,850 $1,521 $1,521 $165 $179 $304 $1,325 $241,579 4-Person $67,600 $1,690 $1,690 $211 $227 $338 $1,445 $261,827 5-Person 1 $73,050 $1,826 $1,826 $236 $268 $365 $1,553 $277,653 Median Income(81-100%AMI) 1-Person $65,450 $1,636 $1,909 $118 $122 $382 $1,518 $327,031 2-Person $74,800 $1,870 $2,182 $135 $143 $436 $1,735 $372,919 3-Person $84,150 $2,104 $2,454 $165 $179 $491 $1,939 $415,315 4-Person $93,500 $2,338 $2,727 $211 $227 $545 $2,127 $454,919 5-Person $101,000 $2,525 $2,946 $236 $268 $589 $2,289 $486,105 Moderate Income(101-120%AMI) 1-Person $78,550 $1,964 $2,291 $118 $122 $458 $1,846 $398,170 2-Person $89,750 $2,244 $2,618 $135 $143 $524 $2,109 $454,104 3-Person $101,000 $2,525 $2,946 $165 $179 $589 $2,360 $506,819 4-Person $112,200 $2,805 $3,273 $211 $227 $655 $2,594 $556,469 5-Person 1 $121,200 $3,030 $3,535 $236 $268 $707 $2,794 $595,801 Assumptions: 2014 HCD income limits30.0%gross household income as affordable housing cost; 20.0%of monthly affordable cost for taxes and insurance; 10.0%downpayment; and 4.0%interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage loan. Utilities based on Alameda County Utility Allowance. Taxes and insurance apply to owner costs only; renters do not usually pay taxes or insurance. Sources: 1. State Department of Housing and Community Development 2014 Income Limits 2. Housing Authority of the County of Alameda, Utility Allowances-7/1/13. 3. Veronica Tam and Associates Appendix C-30 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) This Housing Element includes a variety of programs designed to improve the adequacy and affordability of housing in Dublin and to assist renters and homeowners who cannot afford housing (see Housing Programs). As of February 2014, a total of 365 Dublin households were receiving rental assistance through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. A total of 26 Dublin households were on the waiting list for rental assistance. The Housing Authority of the County of Alameda administers the program in Dublin. Given the continued need for rental assistance, the City supports and encourages the provision of subsidies through the Housing Choice Voucher Program. The City has also promoted the development of affordable housing units as part of various mixed-use and housing projects and initiatives. In August 2008, a mixed-use project consisting of 305 high density residential units and approximately 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial completed construction at the Dublin Transit Center. The project, Avalon at Dublin Station (now known as Eclipse at Dublin Station), is an apartment community with 10 percent of the units set aside for moderate income households. In March 2011, Avalon Bay Communities was approved to construct an additional 505 high density residential apartment units at the Dublin Transit Center. 10 percent of the units will be set aside for moderate income households. The project is currently under construction. In addition, the City worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of the Emerald Vista mixed-income development project. The City provided application/technical assistance as needed by the developer in order to securing financing and other sources of funding to support the development of the project. The project was approved by the Dublin City Council in September 2009 and includes the demolition of 150 existing affordable housing units and the construction of 378 new housing units (both attached and detached) including market rate, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and community building. The project includes 194 (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units) affordable units in various income categories. The project was completed in May 2013 and all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased. The City of Dublin continues to encourage developers to provide affordable housing by awarding qualifying developments with additional market rate units. In 2006, the City initiated a First Time Homebuyer Loan Program (FTHLP) to assist lower and moderate income households with financing towards the purchase of a home. The City provides information on this program on the City website. The website is routinely updated to provide current information on various housing opportunities in Dublin and the region. Since 2007, the City has assisted a total of 54 households with first-time homebuyer loans. The City adopted an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance in 2002 to assure that housing development contributes to the attainment of the City's housing goals by increasing the production of residential units affordable by households of very low, low, and moderate income. In December 2008, the City Council approved an amendment to the Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance to eliminate the requirement to construct owner-occupied very low income units. This modification was in response to feedback the City was receiving from the development community on the feasibility of constructing owner- occupied very low income units. Since 2007, the City has issued 332 permits for the construction of affordable housing units. Furthermore, the City currently has a balance of$7,013,816 in its Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee fund. The City will continue to enforce the provisions of its Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance to further Housing Appendix C-31 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Element goals and policies related to meeting the housing needs of all income segments of the community. F. Affordable Housing Inventory Ten assisted rental housing developments in Dublin provide 982 affordable rental units (Table C-20). This inventory of assisted units includes a review of all multi-family rental units under federal, state, and/or local programs, including HUD programs, state and local bond programs, redevelopment programs, and local in-lieu fees (inclusionary, density bonus, or direct assistance programs). All of these projects are recent developments with the most recent being Emerald Vista. Emerald Vista, formally known as Arroyo Vista, has historically been supported by the Housing Choice Voucher Program. Emerald Vista was redeveloped in 2013 to include 378 units, of which 194 are reserved as affordable units (180 rental units and 14 for-sale units). The City worked with Eden Housing, KB Homes and the Dublin Housing Authority on the development of this project, which includes market rate units, affordable senior housing, affordable family housing, a child care center and a community building. The project was completed in May 2013; all 180 of the affordable rental units have been leased and all 14 affordable for-sale units have been sold. Generally, deed restrictions ensure the long-term affordability of below market rate units. No project is at risk of converting to market rate within the planning period (July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2023) due to expiration of deed restrictions or subsidy contracts. Appendix C-32 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-20: Inventory of Assisted Rental Housing Total Assisted Funding Earliest #Units Project Name Units Units Type Source Date of At Risk Conversion Iron Horse Trails 177 2 Senior/ Private 2032 0 Disabled Park Sierra 283 57 Senior Tax Credits 2055 0 Bonds Tax Credits Pine Groves/Cedar Groves 322 292 Senior Bonds 2062 0 City Loan Senior/ Tax Credits 2059 0 Wicklow Square 54 53 Disabled City Loan Tax Credits Oak Groves 304 243 Family Bonds 2061 0 City Loan HCD MHP Grant Senior/ Tax Credits Camellia Place 112 111 Disabled/ CaIHFA Bonds 2062 0 Family HOME Eclipse at Dublin Station 305 30 Family Private 2062 0 Carlow Court Senior Senior/ City Loan Apartments at Emerald 50 49 Disabled 2067 0 Vista Private Wexford Way Apartments Family/ City Loan at Emerald Vista 130 129 Disabled 2067 0 Private Total 1,867 982 0 Source: Alameda/Contra Costa Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Opportunities Guide, February 2013; California Housing Partnership Coalition,2008;City of Dublin,2014. Appendix C-33 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) G. Estimates of Housing Needs The Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) developed by the Census for HUD provides detailed information on housing needs by income level for different types of households in Dublin. Detailed CHAS data based on the 2006-2010 American Community Survey is displayed in Table C-21. Based on CHAS, housing problems in Dublin include: • Units with physical defects (lacking complete kitchen or bathroom); • Overcrowded conditions (housing units with more than one person per room); • Housing cost burden, including utilities, exceeding 30 percent of gross income; or • Severe housing cost burden, including utilities, exceeding 50 percent of gross income. The types of problems vary according to household income, type, and tenure. Some highlights include: • In general, owner-households were more likely to experience housing problems (48 percent) than renter-households (35 percent). • Large family renter-households, though, had the highest level of housing problems regardless of income level (71 percent). All very low and low income large family renter households experienced a housing problem between 2006 and 2010. • Very low income households were the most likely to be affected by a housing problem (84 percent). Extremely low (78 percent) and low income (82 percent) households were also significantly affected by these issues. • Of the 754 extremely low income Dublin households identified by the 2006-2010 ACS, approximately 77 percent spent more than 30 percent of their monthly income on housing and 65 percent spent more than 50 percent. Appendix C-34 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-21: Housing Assistance Needs Renters Owners Total Household by Type,Income& Elderly Small Large Total Elderly Large Total Hhlds Housing Problem Families Families Renters Families Owners Extremely Low 120 135 0 425 90 4 329 754 0-30% MR) •with any housing problem 92% 70% -- 85% 100% 100% 70% 78% •with cost burden >30% 92% 70% -- 85% 100% 100% 68% 77% •with cost burden>50% 42% 70% -- 68% 89% 100% 60% 65% Very Low 40 115 35 325 145 30 365 690 31-50%MR) •with any housing problem 100% 91%. 100% 97% 52% 100% 73% 84% •with cost burden>30% 100% 91% 100% 97% 52% 67% 70% 820 •with cost burden>50% 50% 78% 100% 83% 24% 67% 52% 67% Low 45 150 35 310 155 95 540 850 51-80% MR) •with any housing problem 100% 90% 100% 94% 32% 95% 75% 82% •with cost burden>30% 100% 87% 100% 92% 35% 95% 75% 81% •with cost burden >50% 100% 43% 29% 53% 19% 95% 55% 54% Moderate/Above Moderate 335 1,550 185 3,410 670 814 7,559 10,969 >80% MR) •with any housing problem 39% 15% 59% 17% 32% 36% 44% 35% •with cost burden >30% 37% 15% 16% 15% 32% 34% 1 43% 34% •with cost burden >50% 9% 1% 0% 1% 10% 12% 11% 8% Total Households 540 1,950 255 4,470 1,060 943 8,793 13,263 •with any housing problem 60% 29% 71% 35% 41% 44% 48% 43% •with cost burden >30% 59% 29% 39% 33% 41% 42% 47% 42% •with cost burden >50% 27% 13% 18% 17% 20% 22% 1 17% 17% Source: HUD Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy(CHAS),2006-2010 ACS data. Notes: Data presented in this table are based on special tabulations from sample Census data. The number of households in each category usually deviates slightly from the 100 percent count due to the need to extrapolate sample data out to total households. Interpretations of these data should focus on the proportion of households in need of assistance rather than on precise numbers. Appendix C-35 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 2. Housing Constraints Although the City of Dublin strives to ensure the provision of adequate and affordable housing to meet the needs of the community, many factors can constrain the development, maintenance, and improvement of housing. These include market mechanisms, government regulations, and physical as well as environmental constraints. This section addresses these potential constraints that affect the supply and cost of housing in Dublin. A. Market Constraints Several local and regional constraints hinder the ability to accommodate Dublin's demand for affordable housing. The high cost of land, rising development costs, and neighborhood opposition can make it expensive for developers to build affordable housing. These constraints may result in housing that is not affordable to lower and moderate income households, or may render some potential residential projects economically infeasible for developers. Land and Construction Costs High development costs in the region stifle potential affordable housing developments. An indicator of construction costs is Building Valuation Data compiled by the International Code Council (ICC). The unit costs compiled by the ICC include structural, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical work, in addition to interior finish and normal site preparation. The data is national and does not take into account regional differences, and does not include the price of the land upon which the building is built. The national average for development costs per square foot for apartments and single-family homes in August 2013 are as follows: ■ Type I or II, Multi-Family: $131.94 to $150.25 per sq. ft. ■ Type V Wood Frame, Multi-Family: $100.18 to $104.74 per sq. ft. ■ Type V Wood Frame, One and Two Family Dwelling: $110.29 to $117.71 per sq. ft. Because of higher land values in the Bay Area, however, overall development costs per square foot in Dublin may be higher. Furthermore, neighborhood resistance to projects can draw out the entitlement process and drive up costs. The difficulty of developing awkward infill sites can also add to the cost of housing. Reduction in amenities and the quality of building materials (above a minimum acceptability for health, safety, and adequate performance) could lower costs and associated sales prices or rents. In addition, prefabricated factory-built housing may provide for lower priced housing by reducing construction and labor costs. Another factor related to construction costs is the number of units built at one time. As the number of units increases, overall costs generally decrease due to economies of scale. The price of raw land and any necessary improvements is a key component of the total cost of housing. The diminishing supply of land available for residential construction combined with a fairly steady demand for housing has served to keep the cost of land high. High and rapidly increasing land costs have resulted in home builders developing increasingly expensive homes in order to capture profits. Information on land cost is limited due to the lack of vacant land for sale. Appendix C-36 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) A density bonus up to 35 percent over the otherwise maximum allowable residential density under the applicable zoning district is available to developers who provide affordable housing as part of their projects. Developers of affordable housing are also entitled to at least one concession or incentive as established in the Zoning Ordinance. Density bonuses, together with the incentives and/or concessions, result in a lower average cost of land per dwelling unit, thereby making the provision of affordable housing more feasible. The City regularly updates its Density Bonus Ordinance to reflect changes in State law. Availability of Mortgage and Rehabilitation Financing The availability of financing affects a person's ability to purchase or improve a home. Interest rates are determined by national policies and economic conditions, and there is little that local government can do to affect these rates. Jurisdictions can, however, offer interest rate write- downs to extend home purchasing opportunities to a broader economic segment of the population. In addition, government-insured loan programs may be available to reduce mortgage down payment requirements. Under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA), lending institutions are required to disclose information on the disposition of loan applications and the income, gender, and race of loan applicants. As shown in Table C-22, a total of 1,726 households applied for loans, either conventional or government-backed, to purchase homes in Dublin in 2012. Approval rates were higher for conventional home purchase loans with an approval rate of 78 percent, in comparison to 74 percent of government loan applications being approved. The approval rate for home improvement loans was 65 percent. Given the high rates of approval for home purchase and improvement loans, financing was generally available to Dublin residents. Overall, the majority of loan applications submitted in Dublin during 2012 were for home refinancing (4,142 applications), 76 percent of which were approved. Table C-22: Disposition of Home Purchase and Improvement Loan Applications-2012 Total Percent Percent Percent Loan Type Applications Approved Denied Other Government Backed Purchase 288 74% 13% 13% Loans Conventional Purchase Loans 1,438 78% 10% 12% Refinance 4,142 76% 10% 14% Home Improvement Loans 65 65% 28% 8% Total 5,933 76% 11% 13% Source:www.LendingPatterns.com , 2013. Notes: 1. Percent Approved includes loans approved by the lenders whether or not accepted by the applicant. 2. Percent Other includes loan applications that were either withdrawn or closed for incompleteness. Foreclosures Foreclosure may occur when households fall behind on one or more scheduled mortgage payments. The foreclosure process can be halted if the homeowner is able to bring mortgage payments current. If payments cannot be resumed or the debt cannot be resolved, the lender can legally use the foreclosure process to repossess (take over) the home. If the home is worth less than the total amount owed on the mortgage loan, a deficiency judgment could, under Appendix C-37 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) some circumstances, be pursued. The homeowner would lose their home and might also owe the home lender an additional amount. Homes can be in various stages of foreclosure. Typically, the foreclosure process begins with the issuance of a Notice of Default (NOD). An NOD serves as an official notification to a borrower that he or she is behind in their mortgage payments, and if the payments are not paid up, the lender may take title to the home. In California, lenders will not usually file an NOD until a borrower is at least 90 days behind in making payments. As of December 2013, 23 properties in Dublin were in this pre-foreclosure stage. Once an NOD has been filed, borrowers are given a specific time period, typically three months, in which they can bring their mortgage payments current. If payments are not made current at the end of this specified time period, a Notice of Trustee Sale (NTS) will be prepared and published in a newspaper. An NTS is a formal notification of the sale of a foreclosure property. In California, the NTS is filed 90 days following an NOD when a property owner has failed to make a property loan current. Once an NTS has been filed, a property can then be sold at public auction. According to foreclosure records, 20 properties in Dublin were in the auction stage of the foreclosure process as of December 2013. Construction Financing Prior to the recession of the early 1990s, and significant changes in lending practices following the savings and loan scandal of the late 1980s, developers could receive loans for 100 percent or more of a project's estimated future value. Now, construction and permanent loans are rarely available for over 75 percent of the future project value for multifamily developments. This means that developers must usually supply at least 25 percent of the project value. The financing of a residential project, particularly affordable housing is quite complex. No firm threshold determines an acceptable `return' on investment, nor the maximum equity contribution at which an otherwise feasible project becomes infeasible. Upfront cash commitment may not be problematic for some developers as long as the project can generate an acceptable net cash flow to meet the acceptable returns. Although financing costs impact project feasibility, these problems are generally equal across jurisdictions and thus are not a unique constraint to housing production in Dublin. B. Governmental Constraints City ordinances, policies, and other regulations can impact the price and availability of housing in Dublin. Land use controls, site improvement requirements, building codes, fees, and other local programs to improve the overall quality of housing may serve as constraints to housing development. The following public policies can affect overall housing availability, adequacy, and affordability. Land Use Controls The General Plan includes policies for all three of the City's Planning Areas: the Primary Planning Area, Eastern Extended Planning Area, and Western Extended Planning Area. The Primary Planning Area consists of the original 1982 City boundaries and those annexations occurring to the west between 1985 and 1991. This area encompasses roughly 3,100 acres. The Eastern Extended Planning Area is located east of the Primary Planning Area, while the Western Extended Planning Area is located west of the Primary Planning Area. Appendix C-38 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Primary Planning Area The General Plan Land Use Element and Downtown Dublin Specific Plan establish land use controls within the Primary Planning Area. General Plan Land Use Element: The majority of the Primary Planning Area has been developed since the 1960s: therefore, the Land Use Element of the General Plan focuses on the remaining uncommitted sites and on the potential for more intensive use of existing sites. Table C-23: General Plan Land Use Element Classification Density Dwelling Units Low Density Single Family 3.8 167 Single Family 6.0 5,411 Medium Density 14.0 2,668 Medium-High Density 25.0 1 1,960 Medium-High and Retail/Office 25.0 280 Mixed Use 25.0 382 Total 10,868 Downtown Dublin Specific Plan: This new Specific Plan was adopted in 2010 and combines the areas of the previous Downtown Core Specific Plan, Dublin Downtown Specific Plan, San Ramon Road Specific Plan, Village Parkway Specific Plan, and West Dublin BART Specific Plan into one comprehensive plan. Downtown Dublin is largely built out, which means that new development projects will primarily replace (or expand upon) existing developments and land uses. This Specific Plan allows for the future construction of approximately 1,300 residential dwelling units as follows: Table C-24: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan District Density Dwelling Units Retail 0.35 FAR 100 Transit-Oriented 85.0 du/acre 1,100 Village Parkway 15.0 du/acre 100 Total 1 1 1,300 As of April 2014, only 291 units are not entitled and developer interest in constructing additional residential units Downtown exceeds the number of units remaining to be built. As a result, theCity is in the process of amending the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan to increase residential development opportunities in the three districts (see also discussions under the Housing Resources section of this Technical Background Report.) Eastern Extended Planning Area The Eastern Extended Planning Area is located east of Dublin's older urbanized area and consists of 3,454 acres, of which 1,657 acres is designated for residential uses. Residential designations for this planning area are outlined in the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan. The Specific Plan includes seven land use classifications that allow for residential development: High Density (HDR), Medium-High Density (MHDR), Medium Density (MDR), Single Family (SF), Estate Appendix C-39 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Residential (ER), Rural Residential/Agricultural (RRA). Taken together, the Specific Plan projects a total of 14,619 housing units upon buildout at the following densities: Table C-25: Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Classification Density(du/acre) Dwelling Units Rural Residential/Agricultural 0.01 3 Estate Residential 0.80 24 Single Family 6.00 4,350 Medium Density 14.00 5,293 Medium High Density 25.00 3,302 High Density 25.10+ 1 1,647 Total 14,619 Western Extended Planning Area Located along the north side of 1-580, west of the City's older urbanized area, the Western Extended Planning Area covers approximately 3,255 acres. The Single-Family designation of the Primary Planning Area and the Rural Residential/Agriculture designation of the Eastern Extended Planning Area are applicable in the Western Extended Planning Area. An additional residential designation unique to this planning area is the Estate designation. The Estate designation is intended for typical ranchettes and estate homes at 0.01 to 0.8 units per gross acre. An Urban Limit Line was adopted by initiative on November 7, 2000 for the Western Extended Planning Area. The Urban Limit Line is located along the City limit line as of the initiative's effective date. Pursuant to the initiative, lands west of the Urban Limit Line are designated as Rural Residential/Agriculture on the General Plan Land Use Map and are within the City's Sphere of Influence. Approximately 2,647 acres lies west of the Urban Limit Line and has been designated Rural Residential/Agriculture. The Initiative is effective for a period of 30 years from the effective date of City Council Resolution 209-00 (November 7, 2000), and the Line's location may be changed only with voter approval during the effective period, and only following review and approval of a General Plan Amendment by the City Council. Any request to change the Urban Limit Line must be accompanied by a request to amend the land use designation to an urban designation. The Urban Limit Line is established to discourage urban sprawl. The City has adequate capacity within the Urban Limit Line to meet its housing needs and therefore, this Line does not present an actual constraint to housing development. Approximately 485 acres lie east of the Urban Limit Line, of which 365 acres are Open Space. The remainder of the Western Extended Planning Area is comprised of the Schaefer Ranch residential development which has been approved for up to 406 residential units. The following table sets forth the development potential of the Western Extended Planning Area. Appendix C-40 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-26:Western Extended Planning Area Classification Density(du/acre) Dwelling Units Rural Residential/Agricultural 0.01 26 Estate Residential 0.80 30 Single Family 6.00 400 Total 456 Livermore Airport Influence Area (AIA) The Livermore Municipal Airport is owned and operated by the City of Livermore. The Airport is a General Aviation Airport which serves private, business, and corporate tenants and customers. The airport is situated on 643 acres of land within the City of Livermore and is located adjacent to the Las Positas Golf Course and the Water Reclamation Plant. Parts of eastern Dublin fall within the Livermore Airport Influence Area and projects that propose to amend the General Plan and/or Eastern Dublin Specific Plan or propose to rezone property within this area are subject to review by the Alameda County Airport Land Use Commission for consistency with the Alameda County Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan (ALUCP). The Airport Land Use Commission has 60 days to review and issue a determination on a project. However, the City Council has the authority to override the Commission's determination with a two-thirds vote. Within the Livermore Airport Influence Area (AIA) is a more restrictive Airport Protection Area (APA). The APA prohibits the establishment of new residential uses or the intensification of existing residential uses. The City currently does not have any residential uses within the APA. The APA could be considered a constraint on housing development in Dublin as it prohibits residential uses along Dublin Boulevard where the City has historically planned higher density residential. However, in balancing the housing needs of the community with safety and exposure to excessive aircraft noise, the prohibition of residential uses within the APA is reasonable. Conclusion The City's residential land use designations facilitate and encourage the provision of a wide range of housing types including single-family dwellings, mobile homes, townhomes, condominiums, second dwelling units, and multi-family units at various densities. Therefore, Dublin's land use regulations are not a constraint to residential development. Residential Development Standards The City regulates the type, location, density, and scale of residential development primarily through the Zoning Ordinance. Zoning regulations are designed to protect and promote the health, safety, and general welfare of residents as well as implement the policies of the General Plan. The following zoning districts allow residential uses: • Agricultural (A): The A zoning district is intended, in part, to preserve and protect agricultural lands that are being used for the commercial production of agricultural commodities consistent with the General Plan and applicable Specific Plans and appropriate standards of public health, safety, welfare, and aesthetics. Agricultural Appendix C-41 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) housing, mobile homes and single-family homes on large rural lots are permitted in the A district. • Single-Family Residential (R-1): The R-1 district is intended to provide for and protect neighborhoods comprised of detached, single-family homes and residential use types compatible with a quiet, family-living environment. The district is consistent with the Low-Density Single-Family Residential, Single Family-Residential, and Medium Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-1 district is expressed as a suffix to the R-1 Zoning Map symbol (e.g., R-1-5,000, R-1- 10,000, etc.). • Two-Family Residential (R-2): The R-2 district is intended to provide for two-family dwellings that have characteristics similar to single-family neighborhoods, duplexes, and residential use types compatible with a quiet living environment. The R-2 district is consistent with the Medium Density Residential, and Medium-High Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-2 district is expressed as a suffix to the R-2 Zoning Map symbol. • Multi-Family Residential (R-M): The R-M district is intended to provide for and protect neighborhoods comprised of single family residences, two family residences, and multi- family residences that are clustered to provide generous open space areas for common use, and that are generally close to transit, shopping, and public facilities. The R-M district is consistent with the Medium Density Residential, Medium-High Density Residential, and High-Density Residential designations of the General Plan depending on the lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area. The lot square footage per dwelling unit of an area in the R-M district is expressed as a suffix to the R-M Zoning Map symbol. Dublin's Zoning Ordinance establishes residential development standards for each zone to ensure quality of development in the community (Table C-27). Characteristic standards applicable to residential development in the City include standards for lot area, lot width and frontage, lot coverage, setbacks, height limits, and parking. Developers of certain affordable and senior housing may request a variety of incentives, including concessions, modifications, or waivers of otherwise applicable development standards set forth in Chapter 8.36 of the Zoning Ordinance. Reduced setbacks, reduced parking, concentration of affordable units, and reduced bedroom sizes were granted in 2003 to facilitate the development of 596 affordable housing units at the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves projects within The Groves at Dublin Ranch (formerly known as Fairway Ranch). In 2009, the City approved the Emerald Vista project (formerly Arroyo Vista) and granted reduced parking requirements for the affordable units. Additionally, in 2013 the City approved an affordable housing project geared towards veterans and granted reduced parking requirements as well as relaxed design standards. For properties within Specific Plan areas, development standards are provided within the respective Specific Plan. In the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan area, development standards are further tailored to individual projects through the Planned Development Zoning and site plan review process. This provides developers with a basic set of development standards and guidelines as well as flexibility to enhance project feasibility and deviate from traditional Appendix C-42 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) development standards contained in the Zoning Ordinance. Flexible development standards include parking requirements, lot coverage, setbacks, and landscaping among other standards. Table C-27: Residential Development Standards Standard A R-1 R-2 R-M Lot Area Interior Lot 100 acres 4,000 sq.ft. 8,000 sq.ft. 5,000 sq.ft. Corner Lot 100 acres 5,000 sq. ft. 9,000 sq.ft. 6,000 sq.ft. 4,000 sq.ft. and 4,000 sq. ft. and Min. Lot Size NA larger as consistent larger as 750 sq. ft. and larger as w/General Plan consistent w/ consistent w/General Plan General Plan Lot Width and Frontage Interior Lot 300 ft. 50 ft. 80 ft. 50 ft. Corner Lot 300 ft. 60 ft. 90 ft. 60 ft. Lot Depth NA 100 ft. 100 ft. 100 ft. Residential Use 1 dwelling unit 1 dwelling unit 1 dwelling unit per full 750 sq. (Max. Per Lot) 1 Second Unit 1 Second Unit 2 dwelling units ft. and larger as consistent w/ General Plan Setbacks 20 ft. average 20 ft. average Front 50 ft. 18 ft. minimum to 18 ft. minimum 20 ft. garage 2 Side 30 ft. (3) 10 ft. 10 ft. (4) Street Side 50 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. 10 ft. Rear 50 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. 30 ft. Other Distance between 100 ft. 10 ft. 20 ft. 20 ft. Residences Max. Lot 40% 1 story, 40% 1 story, 40% 1 story, Coverage NA 35%2 stories 35%2 stories 35%2 stories Common Useable NA NA NA 30%of net site area Outdoor Space Accessory Storage 200 cubic feet Multi-Famil 6 NA NA min. per unit 200 cubic feet min. per unit Height Limits (1) (1) (1) (5) Source: City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance,2013. Notes: 1. West of Dougherty Road, 25 ft. and 2 stories; may be increased to 35 ft. and 2 stories pursuant to a Site Development Review approval by the Zoning Administrator. East of Dougherty Road, 35 ft. and 2 stories. 2. Living spaces may encroach to 15 ft. from Front Lot Line with Site Development Review on lots up to 6,000 sq. ft. in size. 3. Side Yard setbacks in the R-1 zoning district shall be a minimum of 5 ft. plus one foot for each full 10 ft. by which lot width exceeds minimum lot width up to a maximum of 10 ft. 4. Buildings with four or more residences in the R-M zoning district must have a 15-ft. Side Yard on one side. 5. 35 ft. if four or fewer dwelling units; 45 ft. if five or more dwelling units; 75 ft. if five or more dwelling units and lot coverage does not exceed 35 percent. 6. Multifamily accessory storage shall be provided for each unit in a multifamily project that has a private,enclosed garage attached or assigned to the unit. In addition to the R-2 and R-M Zoning Districts, multifamily accessory storage shall also be provided in comparable PD(Planned Development)Zoning Districts and the Downtown Dublin Zoning District. Appendix C-43 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City's height limits are set with respect to neighborhood character and allowable densities. Building height limits in the R-M zone are permitted up to 75-feet for projects with five or more dwelling units and therefore have not constrained residential development. Additionally, residential development in Planned Development Zoning Districts around the Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station is allowed to be constructed with up to five stories of residential uses over parking, recognizing the advantages of compact transit-oriented development in providing affordable housing opportunities. Similarly, residential development in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area around the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station is allowed to be constructed with up to eight stories and a maximum building height of 90 feet. Parking requirements for different types of residential uses in Dublin are summarized in Table C-28. Dublin's parking requirements for a prototypical 100-unit multi-family residential development are comparable to requirements of nearby cities (Table C-29). Additionally, the City has approved reduced parking standards through the Planned Development Zoning process for multi-family residential and mixed use developments adjacent to the Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station; residential uses adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station also benefit from reduced parking standards contained in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan. Appendix C-44 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-28: Dublin Parking Requirements for Residential Uses Residential Use Types Number of Parking Spaces Required Apartments Studio 1 Bedroom 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus 1 parking space for unreserved and guest parking. 2+Bedrooms Condominiums Studio 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus 1 guest parking space 1 Bedroom per dwelling which shall be marked as a guest parking space. 2+Bedrooms 2 covered or garaged spaces per dwelling plus 1 guest parking space per dwelling which shall be marked as a guest parking space. Single-Family/Duplex Lots<4,000 sq.ft. 2 in enclosed garage per dwelling*plus one on-street parking space per dwelling unit within 150 feet of that dwelling unit. Lots>4,000 sq.ft. 2 in enclosed garage per dwelling.* Other Parking Requirements Senior Citizen Housing 1 covered or garaged space per dwelling plus one guest parking space for every three dwelling units. Second Unit 1 parking space per unit. The space may be compact, uncovered, and in tandem with the required parking of the principal dwelling unit. Agricultural Housing Community Care Facility, 2 per dwelling Small Mobile Home Residential Use Secondary 2 per residence to Commercial Use Mobile Home Park 2 per dwelling, plus 1 guest space for every 2 dwellings 1 parking space for every 20 beds plus 1 parking space for each Emergency Shelter employee on the largest shift plus 1 parking space for each company vehicle Transitional Housing (Small) 2 per dwelling Supportive Housing (Small) Transitional Housing (Large) 1 per 3 employees on largest shift, plus 1 per 3 beds Supportive Housing (Large) Single Room Occupancy 1 per unit plus 1 guest parking space for every 3 units SRO Source:City of Dublin,Zoning Ordinance, 2014. Notes: *Except if two, full-size, unenclosed parking spaces are provided elsewhere on a lot for the purposes of converting a residential garage to living space. Appendix C-45 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-29: Comparison of Parking Requirements for Residential Uses Unit Type Dublin San Ramon Livermore Pleasanton Single-Family 2.0/unit 2.0-4.0/unit 1.0-2.0/unit 2.0/unit Multi-Family Studio unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.5-2.0/unit3 1-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.0/unit 1.5-2.0/unit3 2-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 1.5-2.0/unit3 3-Bedroom unit 1.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit 4-Bedroom+unit 1.0/unit 3.0/unit 2.0/unit 2.0/unit Guest Spaces Variesz 25% 25% 14% Prototypical Multi- Family Rental 200 spaces 200 spaces 200 spaces 181 spaces Project' Sources: City of Dublin Municipal Code, 2014; City of San Ramon Municipal Code, 2014; City of Livermore Municipal Code, 2014; and City of Pleasanton Municipal Code, 2008. Notes: 1. Prototypical project assumes: 25% 1-bedroom units; 50% 2-bedroom units; and 25% 3- bedroom units 2. Requirement ranges from 33% for senior projects to 100% for condominium projects and for apartments. 3. Requirement for first 4 units; 1.5 spaces per unit required for each unit thereafter. Although the provision of off-street parking can increase the cost of housing, Dublin's standards are reasonable as requirements for multi-family developments are less than requirements for single-family detached dwellings and comparable to or lower than parking requirements of nearby jurisdictions. Guest space requirements for multi-family developments are also reasonable because these types of developments do not have private driveways for each unit to accommodate parking for guests as is required for new single-family homes on lots larger than 4,000 square feet. Nevertheless, because the increased cost of off-street parking can impact the financing of housing affordability, reduced parking and other incentives, concessions, or waivers and modifications of development standards are available for affordable projects that are eligible for a density bonus pursuant to Chapter 8.52 of the Zoning Ordinance. Additionally, as mentioned previously, the City has granted reduced parking standards for numerous affordable housing projects including Wicklow Square, The Groves at Dublin Ranch, Emerald Vista and the veterans housing project in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area. Reduced parking standards are also available for transit-oriented development projects that are proposed adjacent to both BART stations in the City. Provision for a Variety of Housing State Housing Element law specifies that jurisdictions identify adequate sites to be made available through appropriate zoning and development standards to encourage the development of various types of housing for all economic segments of the population. This includes single-family housing, multi-family housing, mobile homes, agricultural housing, emergency shelters, and transitional housing, among others. Table C-30 summarizes the various housing types permitted and conditionally permitted under the Zoning Ordinance. Appendix C-46 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-30: Residential Uses by District Uses A R-1 R-2 RM C-O C-N C-1 C-2 M-P M-1 M-2 Single-family Residence P P P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Agricultural Housing C/ZA -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Second Unit -- P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Mobile Home P P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Mobile Home Parks -- C/PC C/PC -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Multifamily Dwellings -- -- P P -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Community Care p P P P Facility, Small Community Care C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC Facility, Large Transitional Housing P P P P Small Transitional Housing C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC (Large) Supportive Housing P P P P Small Supportive Housing C/PC C/PC C/PC -- -- C/PC C/PC C/PC C/PC (Large) Emergency Shelters -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- P -- Single Room C/PC -- Occupancy Unit -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Mixed Use* -- C/PC -- -- -- -- C/PC -- -- -- -- Source: City of Dublin Zoning Ordinance, 2014. Notes: P — Permitted Use; C/ZA — Conditional Use Permit/Zoning Administrator; C/PC Conditional Use Permit Planning Commission;--Not Permitted; *"Residential Use Secondary to Commercial Use" is defined as a residence located above the ground floor commercial uses and is referred to herein as"Mixed Use." Single-Family Residence The term "Single-Family Residence" is defined in the Zoning Ordinance as a building designed for and/or occupied exclusively by one family. The definition also includes factory-built housing, modular housing, manufactured housing, mobile homes, and the rental of bedrooms within a single-family dwelling to no more than four borders. Single-family residences are permitted in all residential zoning districts. Agricultural Housing Agricultural housing is defined as dwellings and/or living quarters for farm laborers, or other types of dwellings determined to be substantially similar to the above by the Director of Community Development. Agricultural Housing shall not be in addition to a Caretaker Residence or a Farm Mobile Home. The 2007-2011 found that only 47 Dublin residents (less than one percent of the City's residents) were employed the in agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining industry. Despite the limited number of agricultural workers in the City, Agricultural Housing is permitted in the A district with approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Zoning Administrator. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The Zoning Administrator must make the following findings established in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance prior to approval of a CUP for agricultural housing: Appendix C-47 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • The proposed use and related structures is compatible with other land uses, transportation and service facilities in the vicinity. • It will not adversely affect the health or safety of persons residing or working in the vicinity, or be detrimental to the public health, safety and welfare. • It will not be injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood. • There are adequate provisions for public access, water, sanitation, and public utilities and services to ensure that the proposed use and related structures would not be detrimental to the public health, safety, and welfare. • The subject site is physically suitable for the type, density and intensity of the use and related structures being proposed. • It will not be contrary to the specific intent clauses, development regulations, or performance standards established for the zoning district in which it is located. • It is consistent with the Dublin General Plan and with any applicable Specific Plans. However, pursuant to the State Employee Housing Act (Section 17000 of the Health and Safety Code), employee housing for agricultural workers consisting of no more than 36 beds in a group quarters or 12 units or spaces designed for use by a single family or household is permitted by right in an agricultural land use designation. Therefore, for properties that permit agricultural uses by right, a local jurisdiction may not treat employee housing that meets the above criteria any differently than an agricultural use. Furthermore, any employee housing providing accommodations for six or fewer employees shall be deemed a single-family structure with a residential land use designation, according to the Employee Housing Act. Employee housing for six or fewer persons is permitted where a single-family residence is permitted. No conditional or special use permit or variance is required. The City requires a CUP for all agricultural uses. Similarly, employee housing on agriculturally designated land requires the approval of a CUP. Second Units A Second Unit is a residential unit with separate kitchen, sleeping, and bathroom facilities that is a part of, an extension to, or detached from, a detached single-family residence, and is subordinate to the principal residence. Second units may be an alternative source of affordable housing for lower income households and seniors. California law requires local jurisdictions to adopt ordinances that establish the conditions under which second dwelling units are permitted (Government Code, Section 65852.2). A jurisdiction cannot adopt an ordinance that precludes the development of second units unless findings are made acknowledging that allowing second units may limit the housing opportunities of the region and result in adverse impacts on public health, safety, and welfare. An amendment to the State's second unit law in September 2002 requires local governments to use a ministerial, rather than discretionary process for approving second units (i.e. second units otherwise compliant with local zoning standards can be approved without conditions or a public hearing). Appendix C-48 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) The City adopted a Second Unit Ordinance in 2003 to allow second dwelling units in the R-1 zoning district with a ministerial permit. The Community Development Department will issue a building permit for a second unit if all building permit submittal requirements are met, and if it conforms to the specific standards contained in Section 8.80.040 of the Zoning Ordinance, including but not limited to: • The lot is occupied by a legal existing, detached single-family unit. • The total floor area is not less than 275 square feet or more than 1,000 square feet. In no case shall a second unit exceed 35 percent of the total floor area of the existing single-family residence. • The second unit shall conform to the development standards of the R-1 district. • One off-street parking space is required but may be uncovered and in tandem with the parking of the principal unit. • The principal residence and the second unit combined shall not cover more than 60 percent of the lot. These development standards are typical and consistent with State law. Since adoption of the Ordinance in 2003, 89 second units have been constructed. Nearly all of these second units (88 units) were constructed during the last Housing Element planning period. An additional 44 second units are expected to be constructed during the current Housing Element planning period. Multi-Family Housing Multi-Family housing includes duplexes, apartments, condominiums, or townhomes. As of 2013, multi-family housing units constituted approximately 33 percent of Dublin's housing stock. The Zoning Ordinance provides for multi-family developments by-right in the R-2 and R-M zoning districts. The R-2 zoning district is consistent with the Medium Density and Medium- High Density Residential land use designations of the General Plan which allow for 6.1 — 25.0 dwelling units per acre. The R-M zoning district is consistent with the Medium, Medium-High and High Density Residential land use designations of the General Plan which allow for 6.1 — 25.0+ dwelling units per acre. The General Plan does not place an upper limit on High Density Residential land uses. Furthermore, the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan allows for the development of High Density Residential at 25 units per acre or greater, while the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan allows for Transit Oriented Development at a density of 85 units per acre. Mobile Homes and Mobile Home Parks Mobile homes offer an affordable housing option to many lower and moderate income households. The City permits mobile homes constructed after September 15, 1971 and issued an insignia of approval by the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and permanently located on a permanent foundation system by right in the A, R-1, and R-2 districts. Mobile Home Parks require approval of a CUP by the Planning Commission within the R-1 and R-2 zoning districts. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The required findings for approval of a CUP are stated in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance and are the same as described above for agricultural housing. Community Care Facilities Community care facilities are defined as residential facilities that provide 24-hour care for individuals, including the elderly, persons in an alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility, persons in a facility for mentally disordered, handicapped persons or dependent and Appendix C-49 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) neglected children, persons in an intermediate care facility/developmentally disabled- habilitative, intermediate care facility/ developmentally disabled-nursing, and congregate living health facilities. A community care facility may be located in any type of residence. Consistent with the State Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act, small community care facilities serving six or fewer persons are permitted within all residential zones. Large community care facilities serving seven or more persons require approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Planning Commission within the R-1, R-2, R-M, C-1, C-2, M-P, and M-1 zoning districts. Potential conditions for approval may include hours of operation, security, loading requirements, and management. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to constrain the development of such facilities. The required findings for approval of a CUP are stated in Section 8.100.060 of the Zoning Ordinance and are the same as described above for agricultural housing. As of January 2013, a number of community care facilities are operating in the City of Dublin:15 • Six adult residential facilities with a total capacity of 34 beds; • Two group homes for children with a total capacity of 12 beds; and • Nine residential care facilities for the elderly with a total capacity of 54 beds. Transitional Housing Transitional Housing units or facilities provide a residence for homeless individuals or families for an extended period of time, usually six months or longer, which also offers other social services and counseling to assist residents in achieving self-sufficiency. Transitional Housing may be accessory to a public or civic type use. The City amended the Zoning Ordinance in 2004, and again in 2011, to facilitate and encourage the provision of transitional housing. Transitional housing that operates as group housing is subject to the same permitting requirements as community care facilities consistent with the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act. Transitional housing that is regular housing is permitted where similar housing is otherwise permitted. Emergency Shelters The term "Emergency Shelter" means a housing facility that provides temporary, short-term housing, with minimal supportive services, for homeless individuals or families, provided that no facility shall be used as temporary, short-term housing by any individual or family for more than 30 consecutive days. The City amended the Municipal Code to permit emergency shelters in the M-1 (Light Industrial) Zoning District and similar PD (Planned Development) Zoning Districts, if the project site has an Industrial Park or Business Park/Industrial General Plan land use designation. Applicable development and performance standards are set forth in Section 8.45 of the Municipal Code and are as follows: • Off Street Parking: 1 parking space for every 20 beds plus 1 parking space for each employee on the largest shift plus 1 parking space for each company vehicle. • On-Site Management and Security: On-site management and on-site security shall be provided during the hours when the Emergency Shelter is in operation. 'S State Department of Social Services, Licensing Division. http:i.i4,,vhw.ccid.ca.aev/does /ccld search/ccld search.aspx. Appendix C-50 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • External Lighting: The Emergency Shelter shall provide external lighting in accordance with building security requirements contained in Chapter 7.32 to maintain a safe and secure environment. • Emergency Shelter Management Plan: The operator of an Emergency Shelter shall prepare and submit a management plan to the Community Development Director. • Length of Stay: No individual or family shall reside in an Emergency Shelter for more than 30 consecutive days. • Proximity to Public Transit and Services: An Emergency Shelter shall be located near public transportation, supportive services and/or commercial services to meet the daily needs of shelter residents. If necessary, an Emergency Shelter shall ensure a means of transportation for shelter residents to travel to and from related supportive services provided off-site. • Noise/Nuisances: All activities associated with an Emergency Shelter shall be conducted entirely within the building. Noise shall be limited so as not to create an adverse impact on surrounding uses. No loudspeakers or amplified sound shall be placed or project outside of the shelter. • City, County and State Requirements: An Emergency Shelter shall obtain and maintain in good standing all required licenses, permits, and approvals from City, County and State agencies or departments. An Emergency Shelter shall comply with all County and State health and safety requirements for food, medical and other supportive services provided on-site. Mixed Use Residential uses located above the ground floor of a commercial use are conditionally permitted in the R-1 and C-1 zoning districts and require approval of a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) by the Planning Commission. The City has had much success in promoting and attracting new mixed use development throughout the City, particularly in recent years. These mixed-use projects include: • AMB/Prologis: 308 multi-family apartment units and 150,000 square feet of office space adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station • Tralee Village: 233 multi-family units include 130 apartment units over 33,500 square feet of ground floor commercial and 103 townhouse units • Eclipse at Dublin Station: formerly Avalon at Dublin Station, 305 multi-family apartment units over 15,000 square feet of ground floor commercial • Essex/Connolly Station: 309 multi-family apartment units adjacent to the West Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station; future phases include 150-room hotel and 7,500 square feet of commercial • Crown Chevy Redevelopment Site: 314 multi-family apartment units over 17,000 square feet of ground floor commercial and 72 affordable rental units for veterans Single Room Occupancy Units (SROs) SRO units are one-room units intended for occupancy by a single individual. It is distinct from a studio or efficiency unit, in that a studio is a one-room unit that must contain a kitchen and bathroom. Although SRO units are not required to have a kitchen or bathroom, many SROs have one or the other. In April 2011, the Dublin Municipal Code was amended to conditionally permit SROs in the C-2 district, or comparable PD Zoning District, as long as the following development standards and regulations are met: • All required findings in Chapter 8.100 (Conditional Use Permit) can be made. Appendix C-51 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Common bathroom facilities are provided on-site if individual units do not contain a bathroom. • Common kitchen facilities are provided on-site if individual units do not contain a kitchen. • Individual Single Room Occupancy Units may contain either kitchen or bathroom facilities, but shall not contain both. • Off-street parking is provided in accordance with Chapter 8.76 (Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations). • All new construction or conversion of existing structures complies with Chapter 8.104 (Site Development Review). • All other applicable provisions of the Zoning Ordinance are met. Supportive Housing California Government Code Section 65582 (f) defines "supportive housing" as housing with no limit on length of stay, that is occupied by the target population, and that is linked to an onsite or offsite service that assists the supportive housing resident in retaining the housing, improving his or her health status, and maximizing his or her ability to live and, when possible, work in the community. Government Code Section 65582 (g) further defines "target population" as persons with low incomes who have one or more disabilities, including mental illness, HIV or AIDS, substance abuse, or other chronic health condition, or individuals eligible for services provided pursuant to the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code) and may include, among other populations, adults, emancipated minors, families with children, elderly persons, young adults aging out of the foster care system, individuals exiting from institutional settings, veterans, and homeless people. The City amended the Zoning Ordinance in 2011 to facilitate and encourage the provision of supportive housing. Supportive housing that operates as group housing is subject to the same permitting requirements as community care facilities consistent with the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act. Supportive housing that is regular housing is permitted where similar housing is otherwise permitted. Site Improvements, Exactions, and Development Fees Site Improvements For large subdivisions, the City requires the construction of reasonable on- and off-site improvements pursuant to the Subdivision Map Act. The minimum improvements required of the developer include: • Grading and improvement of public and private streets including surfacing, curbs, gutters, cross gutters, sidewalks, ornamental street lighting, street name signs and necessary barricades and safety devices; • Storm drainage and flood control facilities within and outside of when necessary the subdivision sufficient to carry storm runoff both tributary to and originating within the subdivision; • Debris basins and erosion and siltation control measures to control erosion and siltation; • A sewage system that meets public sewer system standards; • A water distribution system providing an adequate supply of potable water to each lot and fire hydrant within the subdivision; • Fire hydrants and connections shall be of the type and at locations specified by the fire marshal; and Appendix C-52 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) • Public utility distribution facilities including gas, electric, telephone and cable television necessary to serve each lot in the subdivision. The City also requires dedication of land intended for public use. Dedicated streets, easements, rights-of-way, etc., must be designed, developed, and improved according to City of Dublin Public Works standards. Street design criteria are summarized in Table C-31. Table C-31: Street Design Criteria Minimum Service Right of Curb to and Design Criteria Way Curb Curve Landscape Radius Easement Arterials 4-lane 104' 80' 1,200' 107side 6-lane 128' 104' 1,200' 10'/side 8-lane 152' 128' 1,200' 10'/side Collectors Class 1 92' 76' 1,100' 107side Class II 68' 52' 450' 10'/side Residential 56' 40' 450' 57side Residential 46' 36' 1 200' 1 5'/side Cul-de-Sacs 46' 36' 200[ 5'/side Source: City of Dublin,2014. Residential development projects with more than 20 residential units must comply with the City's Public Art Program pursuant to Chapter 8.58 of the Zoning Ordinance. Under the Program, developers are required to acquire and install a public art project on or in the vicinity of the development site, or make a monetary contribution in-lieu. The value of the public art project or in- lieu monetary contribution shall equal or exceed 0.5 percent of the development project's building valuation (excluding land). The purpose of the City's Public Art Program is, in part, to promote the public interest and general welfare through the acquisition and installation of public art works. Participation in the program by residential projects with more than 20 units is not an undue constraint on housing development in the City because: 1) the requirement applies to single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartments alike; and 2) housing projects that set-aside 100 percent of units for lower income households are exempt from the public art requirement. The City often requires dedication of bicycle paths for the use and safety of residents of large residential subdivisions. Schools, fire stations, libraries, or other public facilities may also be required. Park dedication or fee in-lieu of dedication required according to the standard of five acres per one thousand persons, consistent with the Quimby Act. This ratio amounts to 740.5 square feet per single-family unit, 675.2 square feet per multi-family unit, and 370.3 square feet per mobile home unit proposed. Specific standards for design and improvements of subdivisions must be in accordance with the applicable sections of the Zoning Ordinance, the General Plan, the Subdivision Ordinance, any specific plans adopted by the City, and requirements established by the City Engineer. Improvement and dedication requirements are important to maintaining the quality of life in Dublin and to ensuring public health and safety. These standards are typical in the region. Appendix C-53 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Development Fees and Exactions In addition to improvements and dedication of public land, land developers are subject to a variety of fees and exactions to cover the cost of processing permits and providing necessary services and facilities. In general, these fees can be a constraint on housing development and compromise project feasibility because the additional cost borne by developers contributes to overall increased housing unit cost. However, the fees are necessary to maintain adequate planning services and other public services and facilities in the City. The City's Planning Division fee schedule is summarized in Table C-32 and current development impact fees are provided in Table C-33. Reduced, waived, or reimbursed fees are possible incentives that can be requested under the City's Density Bonus Ordinance. The City has demonstrated a commitment to providing concessions that facilitate the construction of affordable housing by waiving future commercial linkage fees on commercially-zoned property within the Dublin Ranch community as an incentive for a developer to provide additional affordable units as part of the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves apartment communities. A total of 626 rental units have been constructed within the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves communities of which 535 units are affordable to very low, low and moderate income households, for both families and seniors. Table C-32: Planning Division Fee Schedule Services Performed Fee Typical Deposit* Residential CUP $1,939 N/A Time Extension Request(PC) $1,125 N/A Time Extension Request(Admin) $225 N/A Zoning Clearance $50 N/A Residential Variance T&M Varies Site Development Review T&M Varies Planned Development T&M $10,000 Tentative Subdivision Map T&M $10,000 Tentative Parcel Map T&M $10,000 CEQA Initial Study and Negative Declaration T&M $25,000+ CEQA Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration T&M $25,000+ CEQA Initial Study and Environmental Impact Report T&M $50,000+ General Plan Amendment T&M $10,000 Specific Plan Amendment T&M $10,000 Rezone T&M $10,000 Source: City of Dublin,2014. Note: *Deposits are based on the City Planner's estimate of hours necessary to complete review of the project. Additional deposits may be required at a later date. Any remaining funds are refunded after the completion of the project. Appendix C-54 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-33: Development Impact Fees Fee Type Amount Fee Type Amount Water System Connection Fee Freeway Interchange Reimbursement Traffic Impact Fees Single Family $11,931/du Low/Medium Densitya $333.72/du Multi-Family Varies' Medium/High Density5 $233.60/du Water Meter Assembly Fee High Density6 $200.22/du Single Family $587/du Tri-Valley Transportation Development Fee Multi-Family I Varies' Attached Units $2,313/du Regional Sewer Connection Fee Detached Units $1,472/du Single Family $14,383/du Downtown Traffic Impact Fee Multi-Family Apt: $9,479/du Low/Medium Densitya $2,378 Condo: $10,788/du Local Sewer Connection Fee Medium/High Density5 $1,666 Single Family $1,74 /du High Density6 $1,426 Multi-Family Apt: $1,151/du Noise Mitigation Fee(East Dublin Only) Condo: $1,309/du Public Facilities Fee Single-Family/ $4.74/du Medium Density Single Family $22,070/du2 Medium High Density $3.32/du Multi-Family $13,794/du2 High Density $2.85/du School Impact Fees Eastern Dublin Traffic Impact Fees3 Citywide $4.97/sf Low/Medium Densitya $8,686-$9,476/du Fire Impact Fee Medium/High Density-' $6,081 -$6,634/du Single-Family $870/du High Density6 $3,954-$5,685/du Multi-Family $544/du Drainage Fee All Units $1.00/sf13 Source:City of Dublin, January 1,2014. Notes: 'Varies,depending on size of the water meter. a<14 units per acre. 3Additional fees for East Dublin and Schaefer Ranch 514 to 25 units per acre. Varies by category and location inside or outside of 6,25 units per acre. Transit Center Area. Total fees average about $68,418 per single family unit and about $41,398 per multi family unit. These figures include school, water, and sewer fees that are imposed by outside agencies over which the City has no control. According to the Building Official, the valuation of a typical single-family unit is $371,467 and that of a typical multi-family unit is $239,048. Overall, development impact fees represent slightly more than 18 percent of the development costs of a single-family unit, excluding land costs. For a typical multi-family unit, development impact fees represent just over 17 percent of the development costs, excluding land costs. Land cost is a significant component of the overall development costs. When land costs are factored into the equation, development impact fees represent an even smaller portion of the total development costs. Nevertheless, the City recognizes the impact of fees on affordable housing development. Therefore, the City offers deferment or amortization of fees for senior housing and housing for lower income households. Appendix C-55 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) In addition to deferment or amortization of fees, and as noted above, the City has demonstrated a commitment to providing concessions that facilitate the construction of affordable housing by waiving commercial linkage fees on commercially-zoned property within the Dublin Ranch community in order to facilitate the development of affordable housing within the Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves apartment communities Inclusionary Housing The City adopted an Inclusionary Housing Ordinance in 2002. Under the Regulations, all new residential development projects of 20 units or more designed and intended for permanent occupancy must construct 12.5 percent of the total number of dwelling units within the development as affordable units. Of the affordable rental units, 30 percent must be set aside for very low income households, 20 percent for low income households, and 50 percent for moderate income households; of the owner occupied affordable units, 40 percent must be set aside for low income households and 60 percent for moderate income households. (The City amended the Ordinance in December 2008 to remove the requirement of very low income units for for-sale housing to recognize that requirement's cost impact on feasibility.) The City will continue to work with stakeholders to review and consider modifications to the Inclusionary Zoning Regulations to enhance their feasibility. The Ordinance provides for five exceptions to the 12.5 percent affordability requirement (Section 8.68.040): • Payment of in-lieu fees; • Off-site projects; • Land dedication; • Credit transfers; and • Waiver of requirements. Pursuant to the Ordinance, developers can pay as an in-lieu fee up to five percent of the inclusionary housing requirement, with the remaining 7.5 percent of the requirement as must- build units. Any request for payment of in-lieu fee above the five percent requires City Council approval. The amount of in-lieu fee is adjusted annually based on real estate indicators. Therefore, the fee is sensitive to the fluctuation in market conditions. Currently, the in-lieu fee is set at$96,000 per affordable unit required. The fee has remained fairly level during the last two years. The last exception, waiver of requirements, gives the City Council flexibility to make exceptions to the Ordinance. Also, Section 8.68.070 provides incentives to make the construction of affordable units more feasible, including: • Fee Deferral— processing and impact fees • Design Modifications- - Reduced lot size - Reduced setback requirements - Reduced open space requirements - Reduced landscaping requirements - Reduced interior or exterior amenities - Reduction in parking requirements - Height restriction waivers Appendix C-56 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) For example, the Positano project is a single-family detached residential product that is subject to the Inclusionary Ordinance. In order to assist the developer in making the provision of affordable housing more feasible, the City Council granted the developer's request that a portion of the affordable units be provided off-site or through the payment of in-lieu fees. The City has also granted the developer's request to provide affordable housing in the form of second dwelling units. Since adoption of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance in 2002, the City has approved more than 8,000 housing units by private developers. Given the flexibility and incentives offered by the City's Inclusionary Housing program, and as demonstrated by the significant housing development entitled after the adoption of the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance, the City's affordable housing requirements are not constraining residential development. Furthermore, the City's High Density Residential zone offers a density of over 25 units per acre. Since there is no established maximum density and the City offers flexibility through its PD process, a project can be tailored to ensure feasibility. Development Permit Procedures Development review and permit procedures are necessary steps to ensure that residential construction proceeds in an orderly manner. The following discussion outlines the level of review required for various permits and timelines associated with those reviews. The timelines provided are estimates; actual processing time may vary due to the volume of applications and the size and complexity of the projects. Single-Family All new single family dwellings are subject to Site Development Review approval by either the Director of Community Development or the Planning Commission. The Building and Safety Division of the Community Development Department also reviews building permit applications for conformity to adopted building codes. Approval of a building permit for a single-family dwelling is ministerial and processing time is highly dependent on the quality of the initial submittal. Multi-Family Housing All multi-family housing projects are subject to Site Development Review by the Planning Commission. If the multi-family housing is proposed as a condominium, the approval process also includes a subdivision map. The tentative subdivision map and Site Development Review are processed concurrently. The application procedure is established in Chapter 8.104 of the Zoning Ordinance. The purpose of the review is to: A. To preserve the architectural character and scale of neighborhoods and the community. B. To ensure that development is well designed in relation to surrounding properties, including that the design, character, height, facade length, roof forms, colors, materials, roof mounted equipment and architectural details of a proposed structure or remodeled structure are compatible with the design, character, height, fagade length, roof form, colors, materials and architectural details of structures in the vicinity. C. To ensure that projects enhance their sites and are harmonious with high standards of improvements in the surrounding area. Appendix C-57 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) D. To enhance the residential and business property values within the City. E. To ensure compliance with development regulations and the requirements of zoning districts, including but not limited to, setbacks, height, parking, landscaping, public art, fences, accessory structures and signage. F. To ensure that each project is designed to comply with the intent and purpose of the zoning district in which it is located and with the General Plan and applicable Specific Plan. G. To promote the health, safety and general welfare. H. To ensure that projects provide adequate circulation for automobiles as well as pedestrians and bicyclists to create a pedestrian friendly environment. The following findings must be made prior to the approval of a Site Development Review application: A. The proposal is consistent with the purposes of this Chapter, with the General Plan and with any applicable Specific Plans and design guidelines. B. The proposal is consistent with the provisions of Title 8, Zoning Ordinance. C. The design of the project is appropriate to the City, the vicinity, surrounding properties and the lot in which the project is proposed. D. The subject site is physically suitable for the type and intensity of the approved development. E. Impacts to existing slopes and topographic features are addressed. F. Architectural considerations including the character, scale and quality of the design, site layout, the architectural relationship with the site and other buildings, screening of unsightly uses, lighting, building materials and colors and similar elements result in a project that is harmonious with its surroundings and compatible with other development in the vicinity. G. Landscape considerations, including the location, type, size, color, texture and coverage of plant materials, and similar elements have been incorporated into the project to ensure visual relief, adequate screening and an attractive environment for the public. H. The site has been adequately designed to ensure proper circulation for bicyclists, pedestrians and automobiles. As the Site Development Review is required for residential and non-residential uses alike and the findings are the same for all uses subject to the requirement, the Site Development Review process is not a constraint on the provision of multi-family housing in Dublin. Appendix C-58 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Processing Timeframes Processing time frames for single-family and multi-family subdivisions vary depending on a number of factors, including size, location, environmental constraints, and developer responsiveness. Much of the newer residential development (single-family and multi-family) is located within the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan Area and is governed by the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and associated Environmental Impact Report. The Specific Plan establishes land use designations for all property within the Specific Plan area and contains development standards such as dwelling units per acre and floor area ratio. The Specific Plan also includes design guidelines and resource management. These standards and guidelines coupled with the Planned Development Zoning process provide the developer with a framework for development as well as flexibility to design a project without being limited by traditional setbacks and lot coverage restrictions. Planned Development Zoning is processed concurrently with site plan review and therefore does not increase the processing timeline. Additionally, the certification of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Specific Plan area reduces the processing timelines for development projects that are consistent with the Specific Plan. For example, all of the high-density residential projects at the Dublin Transit Center as well as the Dublin Ranch communities of Oak Groves and Pine Groves/Cedar Groves were deemed categorically exempt from further environmental review because they were consistent with the Specific Plan. The one factor that contributes to increased processing timelines is the lack of responsiveness by developers to public agency comments. This lack of response often results in additional review time that increases the processing timeline and costs associated with the project. However, since adoption of the Eastern Dublin Specific Plan and Planned Development Zoning in 1994 the City has been able to work successfully with the development community resulting in the approval of over 13,000 residential units. Building Codes and Enforcement The City of Dublin currently uses the following Codes: 2012 Edition of the International Building Code (2013 CA Building Code); 2012 Edition of the International Fire Code (2013 CA Fire Code); 2012 Edition of the Uniform Mechanical Code (2013 CA Mechanical Code); 2012 Edition of the Uniform Plumbing Code (2013 CA Plumbing Code); 2012 Edition of the National Electrical Code (2013 CA Electrical Code); and 1997 Uniform Housing Code. The Planning and Building Divisions of the Community Development Department carry out code enforcement and inspection activities as a means to preserve and maintain the livability and quality of neighborhoods. City staff investigates violations of property maintenance standards as defined in the Municipal Code as well as other complaints. When violations are identified or cited, staff encourages property owners to seek assistance through available housing rehabilitation programs. Although current building codes may be a barrier to the rehabilitation of older properties that are required to be brought up to current code standards, the intent of the codes is to provide structurally sound, safe, and energy-efficient housing. The City of Dublin proactively enforces property maintenance, graffiti and substandard housing ordinances throughout the City. Between 2007 and 2012, Code Enforcement officials documented 3,104 residential code violations. When code violations are unable to be resolved through voluntary compliance or through the nuisance abatement procedure, the City refers such cases to the City Attorney for prosecution. The City Attorney's office may seek injunctions, receivership and civil lawsuits to achieve compliance with City codes. Since 2007, no residential building-related cases were referred to the City Attorney's office. The City will Appendix C-59 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) continue to enforce property maintenance standards and abate substandard structures through Code Enforcement. Housing for Persons with Disabilities Both the federal Fair Housing Amendment Act (FHAA) and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act direct local governments to make reasonable accommodations (i.e. modifications or exceptions) in their zoning laws and other land use regulations when such accommodations may be necessary to afford disabled persons an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling. The City assessed its zoning ordinance, permitting procedures, development standards, and building codes to identify potential constraints for housing for persons with disabilities. The City's policies and regulations regarding housing for persons with disabilities are described below. Zoning and Land Use Under State Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (aka Lanterman Act), small community care facilities for six or fewer persons must be treated as regular residential uses and be permitted by right in all residential districts; Dublin is compliant with the Lanterman Act. Large community care facilities for more than six persons are conditionally permitted within the R-1, R-2, R-M, C-1, C-2, M-P, and M-1 zoning districts. Potential conditions for approval may include hours of operation, security, loading requirements, and management. Conditions would be similar to those for other similar uses in the same zones and would not serve to unduly constrain the development of residential care facilities for more than six persons. The City has not adopted a spacing requirement for community care facilities. The Land Use Element and Zoning Ordinance provide for the development of multi-family housing in the R-2 and R-M zoning districts. Regular multi-family housing for persons with special needs, such as apartments for seniors and the disabled are considered regular residential uses permitted by right in these zones. The Zoning Ordinance has a provision to allow exceptions to development standards for accessory structures (Section 8.40.020.F.2.a). Similarly, the Development Regulations section of the Zoning Ordinance has provisions that allow for encroachments into required setbacks (Section 8.36.050.8.2 & 3). These exceptions/encroachments are allowed citywide and could accommodate a wide range of needs for persons with disabilities. However, circumstances may arise when it would be reasonable to accommodate requests from persons with disabilities to waive a setback requirement or another standard of the Zoning Ordinance to ensure that homes are accessible for the mobility impaired. Whether a particular modification is reasonable depends on the circumstances, and must be decided on a case-by- case basis. In April 2011, the City adopted a formal ministerial process for persons with disabilities to seek relief from the strict or literal application of development standards to enable them to enjoy their dwellings like other residents in Dublin. The City has not established any special distance requirements for the housing for persons with disabilities. Therefore, the State distance standard of 300 feet applies. In order to facilitate housing for persons with disabilities, the City offers fee deferment or amortization for senior housing (which often includes accessible units and is occupied by many seniors with disabilities.) Appendix C-60 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Building Codes The City enforces Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations that regulates the access and adaptability of buildings to accommodate persons with disabilities. In 2007, the City adopted a Universal Design Ordinance that requires new single-family home developers to install base Universal Design features in all single-family developments of 20 or more homes. The Universal Design Ordinance is substantially the same as the Model Universal Design Local Ordinance adopted by the California Department of Housing and Community Development. The City developed a brochure on the Universal Design Ordinance after its adoption in December 2007 and has updated it periodically to ensure that current information regarding the Ordinance is distributed. The brochure and other related information regarding the Ordinance has been posted to the City's website and is also available at the public counter. In 2010, there was an update to the Ordinance to meet the current building code and which took effect January 1, 2011. The City will continue to enforce the provisions of this ordinance. Government Code Section 12955.1 requires that 10 percent of the total dwelling units in multi- family buildings without elevators consisting of three or more rental units or four or more condominium units be subject to the following building standards for persons with disabilities: • The primary entry to the dwelling unit shall be on an accessible route unless exempted by site impracticality tests. • At least one powder room or bathroom shall be located on the primary entry level served by an accessible route. • All rooms or spaces located on the primary entry level shall be served by an accessible route. Rooms and spaces located on the primary entry level and subject to this chapter may include but are not limited to kitchens, powder rooms, bathrooms, living rooms, bedrooms, or hallways. • Common use areas shall be accessible. • If common tenant parking is provided, accessible parking spaces is required. No unique Building Code restrictions are in place that would constrain the development of housing for persons with disabilities. Compliance with provisions of the City's Municipal Code, California Code of Regulations, California Building Standards Code, and federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is assessed and enforced by the Building and Safety Division of the Community Development Department as a part of the building permit submittal. Definition of Family Local governments may restrict access to housing for households failing to qualify as a "family" by the definition specified in the Zoning Ordinance. Specifically, a restrictive definition of "family" that limits the number of and differentiates between related and unrelated individuals living together may impermissibly limit the development and siting of group homes for persons with disabilities but not for housing families that are similarly sized or situated.16 16 California court cases (City of Santa Barbara v. Adamson, 1980 and City of Chula Vista v. Pagard, 1981, etc.) have ruled an ordinance as invalid if it defines a "family" as(a) an individual; (b)two or more persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption; or(c)a group of not more than a specific number of unrelated persons as a single housekeeping unit. These cases have explained that defining a family in a manner that distinguishes between blood-related and non-blood related individuals does not serve any legitimate or useful objective or purpose recognized under the zoning and land use planning powers of a municipality, and therefore violates rights of privacy under the California Constitution. Appendix C-61 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) In April 2011, the City of Dublin amended its definition of "family." The Zoning Ordinance now defines a "family" as one or more persons occupying a dwelling and living as a single, non-profit housekeeping unit, including any servants. This is distinguished from a group occupying a boarding house, community care facility, supportive or transitional housing when configured as group housing, hotel or motel, club, fraternity or sorority house. Conclusion After the extensive Zoning Ordinance revisions completed in 2011, there are no longer any City policies or regulations that serve to constrain housing for persons with disabilities. However, the City will continue to monitor the Zoning Ordinance for potential constraints and make amendments as needed. C. Public Policy Constraints State and Federal requirements may act as a barrier to the development or rehabilitation of housing, and affordable housing in particular. These include State prevailing wage requirements, Article 34 of the State Constitution and environmental review requirements. State Prevailing Wage Requirements The State Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) expanded the kinds of projects that require the payment of prevailing wages. Labor Code Section 1720, which applies prevailing wage rates to public works of over $1,000, now defines public works to mean construction, alteration, installation, demolition, or repair work done under contract and paid for in whole or in part out of public funds. For example, public transfer of an asset for less than fair market value, such as a land write-down, would now be construed to be paid for, in part, out of public funds and trigger prevailing wage requirements. While the cost differential in prevailing and standard wages varies based on the skill level of the occupation, prevailing wages tend to add to the overall cost of development. In the case of affordable housing projects, prevailing wage requirements could effectively reduce the number of affordable units that can be achieved with public subsidies. The following types of projects are exempt from the prevailing wage requirement: • Residential projects financed through issuance of bonds that receive an allocation through the State; or • Single-family projects financed through issuance of qualified mortgage revenue bonds or mortgage credit certificates. Article 34 of the California Constitution Article 34 of the State Constitution requires a majority vote of the electorate to approve the development, construction, or acquisition by a public body of any "low rent housing project' within that jurisdiction. In other words, for any projects to be built and/or operated by a public agency where at least 50 percent of the occupants are low income and rents are restricted to affordable levels, the jurisdiction must seek voter approval known as "Article 34 authority" to authorize that number of units. Dublin has not sought voter approval to grant "Article 34 authority." In the past, Article 34 may have prevented certain projects from being built. In practice, most public agencies have learned Appendix C-62 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) how to structure projects to avoid triggering Article 34, such as limiting public assistance to 49 percent of the units in the project. Furthermore, the State legislature has enacted Sections 37001, 37001.3, and 37001.5 of the Health and Safety Code to clarify ambiguities relating to the scope of the applicability of Article 34. Although Dublin does not have Article 34 authority, the City does not view this as a significant constraint to the development of affordable housing since the City does not typically function as a developer. Environmental Protection State and federal regulations require environmental review of proposed discretionary projects (e.g., subdivision maps, development review permits, etc.). Costs resulting from the environmental review process are also added to the cost of housing and are passed on to the consumer to the extent that the market can bear. These costs include fees charged by local government and private consultants needed to complete the environmental analysis, and from delays caused by the mandated public review periods. However, the presence of these regulations helps preserve the environment and ensure environmental safety to Dublin residents. D. Utility and Public Service Constraints The provision of utilities such as water and sewer as well as public services including police, fire, and schools is costly to local governments and special districts providing municipal services. New development must pay for much of these costs thereby increasing the overall cost of housing. This section provides an overview of potential utility and public service constraints in Dublin. Water Supply and Distribution Dublin's water is distributed by Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD), which purchases water from Zone 7 of the Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, which, in turn, imports it from three sources: State water project, local runoff from the Arroyo Del Valle watershed (stored in Lake Del Valle) and from natural recharge of the groundwater basin. A recent United States District Court decision mandated a 35 percent reduction in pumping from the Sacramento Delta to protect the endangered Delta Smelt. As a result of this mandated reduction, alternative measures to conserve existing and secure additional water supply will be necessary. The largest categorical consumer of water is residential users, and more specifically, single-family residential users. Although the total water demand over the past 10 years has increased for the single-family residential category, the total number of single-family households has increased at a greater rate than the total water demand rate. Therefore, the average annual consumption of a single family household has decreased from 140,700 gallons per year in 2002 to 117,200 gallons per year in 2012, according to the DSRSD. This 16-percent decrease in the average household consumption is due to many factors, including a greater use of water efficient features, installation of more water-efficient landscapes, and greater public education regarding the importance of water conservation. DSRSD has a comprehensive Water Conservation Program in place that includes both supply- and demand-side measures, including audits, incentives, optimal management practices, enforcing wastewater and landscape regulations, education programs, support activities, Appendix C-63 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) metering, and pipe replacement. The City of Dublin also currently utilizes several means to promote water conservation and efficiency in new development: • Implementation of Chapter 8.88 of the Municipal Code (Water Efficient Landscape Regulations) which requires that development projects of a certain size and scope be designed with landscape materials and maintenance that is sensitive to reducing water use. Chapter 8.88 conforms to the state mandate to either have a local Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance or require that new projects conform to the statewide Water Efficient Landscape requirements. • Implementation of Chapter 7.94 of the Municipal Code (Dublin Green Building Code), with the purpose of enhancing the design and construction of buildings and encouraging sustainable construction practices in several categories including water efficiency and conservation. • Participation and collaboration with outside organizations and agencies on programs to educate the public and provide hands-on assistance to increase water conservation efforts. Senate Bill 1087 (enacted 2006) requires that water providers develop written policies that grant priority to proposed development that includes housing affordable to lower-income households. The legislation also prohibits water providers from denying or conditioning the approval of development that includes housing affordable to lower income households, unless specific written findings are made. The City will provide a copy of the adopted 2015-2023 Housing Element to DSRSD within 30 days of adoption. The City will also continue to coordinate with the DSRSD to ensure affordable housing developments receive priority water service provision. Sewage Collection and Treatment The Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) is the purveyor of wastewater collection and treatment services in the City of Dublin. The wastewater collection system includes over 170 miles of sanitary sewers ranging from six to forty-two inches in diameter that are from five to over forty years old. Disposal of treated wastewater is under the jurisdiction of the Livermore- Amador Valley Water Management Authority (LAVWMA). Wastewater collected from the DSRSD service area travels by gravity to the DSRSD wastewater treatment plant which is located in the City of Pleasanton. The plant has a rated dry-weather capacity of 17.0 million gallons per day (mgd). Disposal of treated effluent from the treatment plant in Pleasanton is provided by the Livermore-Amador Valley Water Management Agency (LAVWMA) who exports secondary treated wastewater to the East Bay Dischargers Authority interceptor pipeline for ultimate discharge to the San Francisco Bay via a deep-water outfall. LAVWMA facilities are designed to export a maximum flow of 41.2 mgd during wet weather events. Senate Bill 1087 described above also mandates priority sewage collection and treatment service to housing developments providing units affordable to lower income households. The City will continue to coordinate with DSRSD to ensure priority service provision to affordable housing developments. Fire Protection The Alameda County Fire Department (ACFD) serves as the fire department for the City of Dublin and provides all fire prevention, fire protection and First Responder Emergency Medical Services, including advanced life support (paramedics), within the City. The ACFD has Appendix C-64 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) identified the need to modernize its fleet and make staffing adjustments to adequately serve future development while maintaining current service levels to existing development. Schools The Dublin Unified School District (DUSD) provides public education in the City of Dublin. DUSD currently operates elementary, middle and high schools in the Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas. At build-out of the General Plan, which is expected to occur in 2035, DUSD estimates a student enrollment of 9,755 students. E. Environmental Constraints A community's environmental setting affects the feasibility and cost of developing housing. Environmental issues range from the conservation of biological resources to the suitability of land for development due to potential exposure to seismic, flooding, wildfire and other hazards. This section summarizes these potential constraints in Dublin. (Refer to the Conservation Element, Seismic Safety and Safety Element, and the Schools, Public Lands, and Utilities Element of the General Plan for more detailed analyses and mitigating policies that address environmental issues or hazards within the Dublin planning area.) Biological Resources Dublin's Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas are located within Livermore Drainage Unit which is one of two major drainage basins in the Alameda Creek Watershed. Of the many streams in the Livermore Drainage Unit, two flow through Dublin's Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas — Alamo Creek and Tassajara Creek, respectively. Portions of these creeks have been channelized and remaining sections are being improved as a result of subdivision developments. The Western Extended Planning Area lies within the San Lorenzo Creek Watershed and includes the Palomares Creek and Dublin Creek sub-watersheds. Several significant streams traverse the Western Extended Planning Area including Hollis Canyon and Martin Canyon Creeks in the western hills. Extensive areas of riparian vegetation are located along stream courses in the Western Extended Planning Area. This riparian woodland has importance to wildlife in the area. Considerable damage to riparian areas has resulted from intensive grazing. Oak woodland is another sensitive habitat community located in Dublin. Most of the oak woodland that can be found in Dublin is concentrated in the Western Extended Planning Area. In addition to California live oaks, other species such as bay, laurel and California buckeye are a vital part of this plant community. The City emphasizes preservation of oak woodland in the Western Extended Planning Area. Development should be clustered in grassland areas wherever possible to protect existing trees. However, as part of comprehensive planning for development in this area, some oak woodland may need to be removed. Removal of oaks is allowed only after all feasible site planning efforts have been made to preserve trees. Heritage Tree Preservation Heritage trees, defined as any oak, bay, cypress, maple, redwood, buckeye, and sycamore tree having a trunk or main stem of 24 inches or more in diameter or any other tree required to be preserved as part of a discretionary entitlement, are protected by City ordinance. Removal of heritage trees requires a permit upon finding that the tree presents a public safety risk, removal Appendix C-65 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) is necessary for reasonable development of property, does not increase erosion or stream water flow potential, or would not otherwise affect neighborhood aesthetics. Seismic Hazards The Calaveras Fault is the major active fault in the planning area with rupture potential and runs parallel to and just west of San Ramon Road. The Pleasanton Fault, located near the west edge of Camp Parks, is difficult to locate precisely. The State has established Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones along both faults, requiring detailed studies of rupture hazards prior to construction. Few potential building sites within the City of Dublin or the extended planning area are without geologic impact or hazard. The hazard may be actual, such as an active landslide or proximity to an active fault, or potential, such as a proposed cut that might activate a landslide. Mitigation of hazards may increase construction cost, but will reduce long-term costs to both property owners and the City. Fire Hazards Steep, inaccessible slopes and brush create a high fire hazard in the western hills. Additionally, areas within the Extended Planning Areas that are adjacent to open space are susceptible to fire hazards. For projects that are constructed outside a fire station service area (greater than 1.5 miles from the nearest fire station) and/or interface with open space, certain built-in fire protection measures will be necessary. For example, sprinklers are required for all habitable structures beyond five minutes response time from a station. A fire protection buffer zone may also be required around the perimeter of residential development situated adjacent to undeveloped open space land. Furthermore, the City enforces its Fire Safe Roof and Spark Arrestor ordinances for development proposed near high fire hazard areas. These measures may increase the cost of new housing in vulnerable areas; however, the added protection is necessary to ensure public health, safety, and welfare. Flooding Both 100 and 500 year flood zones have been identified in portions of the Primary and Eastern Extended Planning Areas; no100 year or 500 year flood zones have been identified in the Western Extended Planning Area. Most of the areas in the 100 year flood plain have been built upon. Any new construction in flood prone areas must comply with Chapter 7.24 (Flood Control) of Title 7 of the Dublin Municipal Code including constructing the first floor above the floodplain level. A number of channel improvements have been implemented since the early 1990's as a result of local developments partnering with Zone 7 and/or the City of Dublin, and Caltrans transportation projects. Channel improvements have been made along Tassajara Creek (Line K), Alamo Creek (Line F), and Big Canyon Creek (Line J-1). In addition to the major creeks in Dublin, several tributaries have undergone improvements as well, including the undergrounding of Line G-3 and the channel wall-raising of Line G-5. While no major flood improvement projects have clearly been identified in the City of Dublin for the future, Zone 7 is presently working on an update to their Stream Management Master Plan (SMMP), which will consider new, innovative approaches to providing regional flood protection, including options that may include the use of enhanced floodplains and vegetated stormwater Appendix C-66 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) channels. Areas along Chabot Canal located in Camp Parks and upland areas along Tassajara Creek will likely present partnering opportunities for Zone 7 and the City of Dublin. Appendix C-67 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) 3. Housing Resources This section evaluates the resources available in Dublin for the development and preservation of housing. A. Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) State law (California Government Code Section 65584) provides for councils of governments to prepare regional housing allocation plans that assign a share of a region's housing construction need to each city and county. In the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) is the council of governments authorized under State law to identify existing and future housing needs for the region. ABAG adopted a new regional housing allocation plan on July 18, 2013. This "Regional Housing Needs Assessment" (RHNA) covers the planning period from January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022. Existing need is evaluated based on overpayment (30 percent or more of income), overcrowding by lower income households, and the need to raise vacancy rates in the jurisdiction to a level at which the market would operate freely. The housing assessment also includes an impaction correction to reduce the further concentration of lower income households in jurisdictions that already have more than the regional average of such households. ABAG's methodology is based on the regional growth estimates developed by the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). These are "planning goals" and are not meant to match, and often exceed, anticipated housing production. The planning goals developed by HCD are provided to ABAG in the form of regional housing goals, divided into income categories. ABAG is responsible for allocating the RHNA goals to cities and counties in the Bay Area. The RHNA is a minimum needs number—jurisdictions are free to plan for, and accommodate, a larger number of dwelling units than the allocation. The jurisdiction must, however, identify adequate sites at appropriate zoning and development standards to accommodate its RHNA. While the jurisdiction must also show how it will facilitate and encourage the development of these units, it is not obligated to build any of the units itself or finance their construction. According to the RHNA, the City of Dublin has a total housing construction need of 2,285 units. Table C-34 shows Dublin's 2014-2022 planning period allocation. The City must accommodate these units either through production of units or provision of adequate sites that can accommodate these units. Specifically, for facilitating the development of lower income units, the State has established a default density of 30 units per acre. Appendix C-68 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-34: Regional Housing Needs Assessment (2014-2022) Income Level Dwelling Units % of Total Extremely Low/Very Low-Income' 796 34.8% Low-Income 446 19.5% Moderate-Income 425 18.6% Above-Moderate-Income 618 27.0% Total 2,285 100.0% Source:ABAG Regional Housing Needs Assessment Note 1:AB 2634 amending the Housing Element law requires local jurisdictions project its future housing needs for extremely low income households(0-30 percent AMI). Specifically, State law provides two methodologies for estimating the extremely low income needs —either by splitting the very low income category evenly between extremely low(0-30 percent AMI)and very low(31-50 percent AMI)incomes;or to apportion the very low income category based on Census data. The 796 very low income RHNA units can be split into 398 extremely low(50 percent)and 398 very low(50 percent)income units. B. Credits against the RHNA Approved Projects As the RHNA is for the planning period of January 1, 2014 through October 31, 2022, housing units approved but not yet constructed as of January 1, 2014 can be credited toward the RHNA. As of February 2014, seven projects have been approved in the City but not yet constructed. These recent development activities in the City have been primarily lower and medium density developments, and most opted to pay a fee in-lieu of including affordable units on site. One project — the Crown Chevy redevelopment site (formerly known as the Kingsmill project) - fulfills its affordable housing requirement by providing a 1.37-acre parcel to Eden Housing to develop up to 76- apartments for low income households. At least 38 units will be reserved for returning veterans who have been severely injured. The remaining 38 units will be set aside for low income families with a preference for families of veterans. Project Very Low Low Moderate Above Total Moderate Crown Chevy/Kingsmill 0 0 0 314 314 Veteran Housing 0 76 0 0 76 AMB/Prologis 0 0 1 0 310 310 Nielsen 0 0 0 36 36 Transit Center E-1 0 0 0 105 105 Moller Ranch 0 0 0 370 370 Dublin Ranch North 0 0 0 4 4 Total 0 76_1 0 1,139 1 1,215 Appendix C-69 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Remaining RHNA Based on units approved, the City has already met a portion of its RHNA obligations. Specifically, the City has met its requirement for the above moderate income RHNA, with a remaining RHNA of 1,591 lower and moderate income units (see Table C-35). Table C-35: Remaining RHNA Extremely/ Low Moderate Above Total Very Low Moderate RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Units Approved 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Remaining RHNA 796 370 425 0 1,591 C. Future Development Potential Vacant Sites Vacant residential properties in the City can accommodate a maximum of 1,620 units based on maximum permitted densities (Table C-36). However, based on the recent trend of development proposals averaging closer toward the mid-point densities, the more realistic estimate of development potential is 965 units. Appendix C-70 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-36:Vacant Sites Dens!t units/Acre No. Project Min. Max. Potential Potential GP Land Use EDSP Land APN Lot Size Zoning Existing Units Units Units Affordability Use (Acres) Min. Max. Pot'I Use 905-0002- Above Single 002 (1) Croak 104 692 346 Moderate Low Density Family 905-0002- 115.4 PD 0.9 6.0 3.0 Vacant 001-01 (2) Righetti 59 134 77 Above Medium Medium 905-0001- 9.6 PD 6.1 14.0 8.0 Vacant Moderate Density Density 005-02 (3) Branaugh 59 136 78 Above Medium Medium 905-0001- 9.7 PD 6.1 14.0 8.0 Vacant Moderate Density Density 004-04 Rural (4) Kobold 12 28 16 Above Medium Medium 985-0072- 2.0 PD 6.1 14.0 8.0 Homesite Moderate Density Density 002 Medium Medium 986-0028- Single (5) McCabe 6 14 10 Moderate Density Density 002 1.0 PD 6.1 14.0 10.0 Family Home Medium Medium 905-0002- (6) Croak 63 146 104 Moderate Density Density 001-01 10.4 PD 6.1 14.0 10.0 Vacant Tipper 50 115 82 Moderate Medium Medium 986-0004- 8.2 PD 6.1 14.0 10.0 Agricultur (7) Ti pp Density Density 01 al (8) Anderson 99 175 108 Moderate Medium- Medium- 7.0 PD 14.1 25.0 15.4 Vacant High Density High Density. Beltran/ Medium- Medium- (9) Sperfslag 45 80 64 Moderate High Density High Density 3.2 PD 14.1 25.0 20.0 Vacant e (10) Chen 56 100 80 Moderate Medium- Medium- 985-0027- 4.0 PD 14.1 25.0 20.0 Vacant High Density High Density 002 Total: 1 553 1,620 965 170.5 Note: 1. A rural homesite is a land use description used by the County Assessors Office. It is largely a vacant lot,previously zoned for agricultural uses,and is currently occupied by a single-family home and accessory structures. Appendix C-71 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-8:Vacant Residential Sites `4 City of Dublin Vacant Residential Sites to ma' s 3 >q° w#R�ypa..r- �♦ s , y kt s M% GY.FA'i�,3w i?43vf q�"�, <4 3' a t �n '.7LL'7T�'3T32n..�'AFSa =! ol[ylr1�9e9n,£•rAA.2r e_ Appendix C-72 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan The Downtown Dublin Specific Plan combined the area of the former Downtown Core Specific Plan, Dublin Downtown Specific Plan, San Ramon Road Specific Plan, Village Parkway Specific Plan, and West Dublin BART Specific Plan into one comprehensive plan (Figure C-9). This plan was approved by the Dublin City Council on February 1, 2011. Existing uses in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area are characterized by commercial and office uses with large surface parking spaces. Existing vacancies and underutilization of land are evident throughout the Specific Plan area. Within the Specific Plan, three districts have been identified to establish unique development standards and guidelines: • Retail District: Comprised of mostly regional serving large-format retailers bounded by Amador Valley Boulevard, 1-680, Dublin Boulevard and San Ramon Road. The Specific Plan allow for up to 100 residential units in the Retail District. • Transit-Oriented District: Comprised of land south of Dublin Boulevard and within walking distance to the West Dublin BART Station. The Specific Plan allows for up to 1,100 residential units in the Transit-Oriented District; to date, 1,009 units have been entitled, with a remaining cap of 91 units only. • Village Parkway District: Comprised of retail and service-oriented businesses along both sides of Village Parkway. The Specific Plan allows for up to 100 residential units in the Village Parkway District. As previously discussed (Table C-24), multi-family and mixed use developments are permitted in the three districts, with an established cap of 1,300 residential units in the Specific Plan area. Appendix C-73 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Figure C-9: Downtown Dublin Specific Plan ` jLEGEND QS�,'t: Plan:rvdar Spesi}ic Plan Dmfricts Pood T.a.il.!henle9_..icl A.. .,.i. s.Ci'16-i 7, if•.D' The City is in the process of amending the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan to increase residential development opportunities in the area and distribute potential development across three districts. Once amended the Specific Plan would allow for 300 additional units in the Retail District (400 units total), 800 additional units in the Transit-Oriented District (1,900 units total), and 100 additional units in the Village Parkway District (200 units total). With the amendment, a total of 2,500 residential units would be permitted in the Specific Plan area. However, about 1,009 of the 1,900 units in the Transit-Oriented district have been entitled already, leaving a capacity of 891 additional units in that district. Table C-37: Amendment to Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Existing Proposed District Density Dwelling Unit Dwelling Unit Density Ca Ca Retail 0.35 FAR 100 22.0 du/ac (min) 400 Transit-Oriented 85.0 du/acre 1,100 30.0 du/ac(min) 1,900 Village Parkway 15.0 du/acre 100 15.0 du/ac(max) 200 Total 1,300 2,500 Appendix C-74 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) As part of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan amendment and this Housing Element update, City staff conducted a parcel-specific vacant and underutilized sites analysis to identify properties with near-term development potential within the three districts. Factors considered included: • Developer interest • Existing vacancies and availability of space for lease • Properties available for sale • Age of existing structures • Deferred maintenance • Existing Floor Area Ratio (FAR) compared to allowable FAR • Size of property and lot consolidation potential If these properties were to be redeveloped according to the proposed allowable densities, up to 408 units may be achieved in the Retail District, 1,679 units in the TOD District, and 488 units in the Village Parkway District, for a total capacity of 2,679 units. However, given the dwelling unit cap established in each district, only about half of the capacity is used to fulfill the RHNA. (A detailed sites inventory is included in Appendix D.) Density and Affordability State Housing Element law establishes a default density of 30 units per acre for communities in Alameda County with a population over 25,000 as being adequate to facilitate and encourage the development of lower income housing. However, this default density is not a mandate and local jurisdictions can use alternative density thresholds to measure feasibility for lower income housing based on a demonstrated history. City staff researched recent affordable housing projects in the Greater Tri-Valley region and concluded that affordable housing for lower income households can be achieved at a density between 20 and 25 units per acre (Table C-38). The City had also previously contacted EAH, developer of Camellia Place at the Dublin Transit Center. The representative of EAH commented that affordable housing can be achieved in Dublin at a density of around 22 units per acre. At this density, it is feasible to develop two-three story walkup apartments at a reasonable level of subsidies. Based on the affordable housing projects in the Greater Tri-Valley area, this Housing Element uses 22 units per acre as a density threshold for measuring feasibility for lower income housing. Specifically because once amended, the majority of the Retail District of the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan would require a minimum density of 22 units per acre, 75 percent of the development cap in this district is credited toward the lower income RHNA. Development potential in the TOD District, with a minimum density of 30 units per acre, defaults to the lower income level of affordability. Appendix C-75 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Table C-38: Greater Tri-Valley Affordable Housing Projects Total Affordable Density Project Name City Units Units Affordability Level Unit Type (d /ac) Anderson Dublin 108 88 Lower and Moderate Apartment 15.4 Wicklow Square Dublin 57 57 Very Low Apartment 19.4 Emerald Vista Dublin 180 178 Lower Apartment/Senior 17 Kingsmill Dublin 76 76 Lower Apartment/ 53 Veteran Quail Ridge Danville 13 7 Very Low Apartment 21 Valley Vista San Ramon 105 105 Lower Apartment/Senior 22 Seville San Ramon 165 165 Lower Apartment 25 Highland Point San Ramon 293 293 Lower and Moderate I Apartment 25 Valencia San Ramon 186 186 Lower and Moderate Apartment 24 Carmen Avenue Livermore 30 29 Very Low Apartment 29 For projects to be developed in the Medium Density (6.1-14.0 units per acre) and Medium- High Density (14.1-25.0 units per acre) categories, the City evaluated the affordability level on a site-by-site basis. For sites that are most likely to be developed as single-family homes, these sites are credited toward meeting the City's above moderate income RHNA. For sites that are most likely to be developed as attached multi-family development (such as condominiums and townhomes), these sites are used to fulfill the City's moderate income RHNA. Adequacy of Sites Inventory The City's remaining residential sites and sites in the Downtown Dublin Specific Plan area, along with approved projects, have the potential to accommodate up to 3,671 units. Overall, the available sites/approved units total 1,367 lower income units, 448 moderate income units, and 1,856 above moderate income units (see Table C-39), adequate to meet the City's RHNA for the planning period. Table C-39: Summary of Sites Inventory and Remaining RHNA Extremely Above Low/ Low Moderate Moderate Total Very Low RHNA 796 446 425 618 2,285 Units Approved 0 76 0 1,139 1,215 Sites Capacity Vacant Residential Sites 0 448 517 965 Downtown Dublin SP Retail 400 0 0 400 TOD' 891 0 0 891 Village Parkway 0 0 200 200 Surplus/(Shortfall) +125 +23 +1,238 +1,386 Note 1: Represents 891 units in remaining building cap in this district. Appendix C-76 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Infrastructure Capacity According to the Dublin San Ramon Services District Water Master Plan (2005), the Dublin San Ramon Services District (DSRSD) currently serves the Central Dublin, Eastern Dublin, and Camp Parks area. The District's service area will encompass approximately 27 square miles and is projected to include build out of the existing service areas plus the Western Dublin and Dougherty Valley planning areas. Build out is estimated at 78,260 residents by 2020. Due to the recent economic recession and depressed housing market, buildout of the service area has delayed. For example, current (2012 American Community Survey) population in Dublin is estimated at 45,800, well below the projected 2015 population of 50,320, or 10,320 residents below the projected population by 2020. The City has a RHNA of 2,285 units through 2023. Prorating this RHNA for the planning period of the master plan yields an additional 1,430 units. At an average household size of 2.7 persons per household, the additional units would yield 3,860 additional residents in Dublin, well below the projected buildout provided for in the water plan. Therefore, projected water services capacity is adequate to accommodate the City's RHNA. The Dublin San Ramon Service District also provides wastewater collection and treatment services to the City of Dublin in Alameda County and portions of the City of San Ramon in Contra Costa County. The District's wastewater service area is smaller than the water service area (wastewater service to the northern portion of San Ramon and to the Dougherty Valley is provided by the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District). The DSRSD wastewater collection system includes over 107 miles of sanitary sewers from 6 to 42 inches in diameter. The ages of the sewers range from less than 5 to over 40 years old. The DSRSD Wastewater Collection System Master Plan Update (February 2000) states that there are eight improvement projects recommend providing the required capacity in the District's wastewater collection system. All necessary capital improvements were completed by 2003 to serve future growth. D. Financial Resources Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee As a small city, the City of Dublin has very limited access to financial resources for affordable housing. The significant resource for the City is the Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee. The City adopted an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance in 2002 to assure that housing development contributes to the attainment of the City's housing goals by increasing the production of residential units affordable by households of very low, low, and moderate incomes. Upon request, the City Council can allow the applicant to pay a fee in-lieu of constructing the affordable units that the developer would otherwise be required to construct. In-lieu fees are placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. The In-Lieu Fee is primarily used to support the construction of affordable housing units. The City also approved a Commercial Linkage Fee on May 3, 2005. Fees are charged to non-residential developments, based on the square footage and type of commercial building space and placed into an Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund. Appendix C-77 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) As of April 2014, the City's Inclusionary Zoning In-Lieu Fee Fund has a balance of $7,013,816. The funds are to be used for the following activities: • Affordable housing construction loans; • First Time Homebuyer Loan Program; • Homeownership training and foreclosure prevention services; • Rental assistance programs; • Housing Division's administrative costs; and • Alameda County Homeless Management Information System. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) CDBG is the largest federal housing-related program for affordable housing. It is a "pass- through" program that allows local governments to use federal funds to alleviate poverty and blight. Cities with populations of over 50,000 receive CDBG funds directly from HUD, while smaller cities usually use county-administered CDBG funds. HUD makes allocations based on a formula that takes population, poverty, and housing distress into account. CDBG funds are used for a variety of housing efforts including activities aimed at reducing costs for private development (helping fund site acquisition, improvement, and other soft costs); housing acquisition and rehabilitation through short and long-term loans, grants or loan guarantees; direct payment of rent or mortgage and housing counseling services; and fair housing activities. CDBG funds are best used in combination with other subsidy sources or to provide pre-development funding to initiate housing development. As a small city, the City of Dublin does not qualify to receive CDBG funds directly from HUD. However, it participates in the County of Alameda CDBG program. The County offers the Home Improvement Program for Dublin residents using CDBG funds. E. Administrative Resources The Bay Area is fortunate to have a large number of successful non-profit and for-profit housing developers who have produced thousands of high-quality, well-managed affordable housing projects for lower and moderate income households. Collectively, they have produced multi-family developments, single-family developments, rental and ownership opportunities, sweat-equity developments, mixed income projects, mixed use developments, and housing that is specifically designed to meet the needs of seniors, disabled persons, farm workers, female-headed households, people with substance abuse problems, and/or homeless persons. Active affordable housing developers in the region include Resources for Community Development, Satellite Housing, East Bay Habitat for Humanity, Eden Housing, East Bay Housing Organizations, ECHO Housing, and BRIDGE Housing Corporation, among others. The City of Dublin also achieves affordable housing through its Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance. Appendix C-78 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Appendix D: Vacant and Underutilized Sites in Downtown Dublin Specific Plan Downtown Dublin Specific Plan-Transit Oriented Develo ment(TOD)District roperty ndition Assessor Building Year Age of FAR FAR Developer of Parcel Number Address Descri tion of Parcel Acres S .Ft. Built Structure (existing) DDSP Units Interest 941-1500-042-06 6701 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Stoneridge Chrysler 4.07 23,856 2000 13 0.135 0.5 122 Yes 4 941-1500-051-02 6665 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Fountainhead Montessori 1.15 20,604 1983 30 0.412 0.5 34 Yes 2.3c. 941-1500-053-00 6670 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Fountainhead Montessori 2.41 20,604 1983 30 0.196 0.5 72 Yes 2.3c. 941-1500-052-00 6690 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Fountainhead Montessori 0.99 20,604 1982 31 0.476 0.5 30 Yes 2.3c. 941-1500-049-05 6694 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Mai Plaza,por.(Golf 2.41 26,886 1992 21 0.256 0.5 72 2.3a. 941-1500-049-07 6698 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Enea Plaza,por. 0.85 5,120 1992 21 0.139 0.5 25 941-1500-048-02 6770 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Enea Plaza,por.(Big 5) 1.84 20,196 1988 25 0.252 0.5 55 bld s 941-1500-038-03 7350 AMADOR PLAZA ROAD Enea Plaza,por.(3 3.90 46,096 0.271 0.5 117 941-1500-033-00 6511 GOLDEN GATE DRIVE Randalls Food and 1.89 33,438 1980 33 0.406 0.5 57 2.3a.4. Dru s 941-1500-046-04 Vacant 3.74 n/a n/a n/a 0.5 112 941-1500-015-24 7600 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Chase Bank 3.10 66,695 1986 27 0.493 0.5 93 2.3unk. 941-1500-015-19 7704 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Mancini's 1.98 15,868 1987 26 0.184 0.5 59 2.3a. 941-1500-044-02 7884 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Dublin Retail Center 10.51 147,807 1971 42 0.323 0.5 315 941-1500-030-00 6513 REGIONAL STREET Willow Tree 1.17 C5,0651 42 0.5 35 Yes 941-1500-031-00 6513 REGIONAL STREET Parking Lot-Regional 0.49 n/a 0.5 15 Yes 3a. St.Property 941-1500-025-00 6543 REGIONAL STREET Libby building 1.33 31 0.259 0.5 40 Yes 3a. 941-1500-054-00 6680 REGIONAL STREET Holiday Inn 4.65 39 0.597 0.5 140 Yes 941-1500-029-02 6750 REGIONAL STREET Ead Anthony's 3.54 36 0.231 0.5 106 Yes 941-1500-036-02 7944 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Hooters 0.80 33 0.146 0.5 24 Yes Appendix D-1 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan-Transit Oriented Development(TOD)District Condition Assessor Building Year Age of FAR FAR Developer of Parcel Number Address Description of Parcel Acres S .Ft. Built Structure (existing) (DDSP) Units Interest Property 941-1500-028-02 7922 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Furniture Store 1.46 19,200 1980 33 0.302 0.5 44 941-1500-037-00 7950 DUBLIN BOULEVARD Corrie Center 3.72 78,516 1979 34 0.484 0.5 112 Yes 3unk. Total 56.01 1,679 Condition of buildings: 1=For-Sale sign posted 2=For-Lease sign posted 3=Existing vacancies a=1-3 vacancies b=4-6 vacancies c=7 or more vacancies 4=Deferred maintenance Appendix D-2 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan-Retail District Condition Assessor Parcel Building Year Age of FAR FAR Units Developer of Number Address Description of Parcel Acres Sq.Ft. Built Structure (existing) (DDSP) Interest Property 941-0173-006-01 7991 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Big Lots 2.90 22,206 1960 53 0.176 0.5 41 4.5. 941-0173-004-05 7723 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Shamrock Village,por. 0.85 9,200 1960 53 0.250 0.5 12 3a. (left of GS H) 941-0173-003-00 7667 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Urgent Care 0.41 1,590 2000 13 0.090 0.5 6 4 941-0173-001-09 7601 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Erik's 0.98 3,880 1966 47 0.091 0.5 14 4 941-0305-004-01 7990 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Big and Tall 1.32 14,500 1969 44 0.253 0.5 29 3a.2. 941-0305-023-00 7180 REGIONAL ST Almond Plaza 4.50 4,235 1979 34 0.022 0.5 99 3c.2. 941-0305-024-00 7144 REGIONAL ST Horizon 2.72 8,640 1976 37 0.073 0.5 60 Yes 4.5. 941-0305-034-02 7080 SAN RAMON RD See's lot 1.20 n/a n/a 0.000 0.5 26 1 941-0305-014-02 7337 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Ranch 99 2.00 28,080 1971 42 0.323 0.5 44 2.3a. 941-0305-044-00 7575 DUBLIN BLVD Bassett 1.48 17,789 2006 7 0.275 0.5 33 2.3a. 941-0174-002-02 7567 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD Office Building 0.98 38,760 1985 28 0.908 0.5 3 Sunk.2. 941-0305-032-00 7123 AMADOR PLAZA RD Amador Center 1.38 19,300 1980 33 0.322 0.5 30 3a. Total 20.72 408 Condition of buildings: 1=For-Sale sign posted 2=For-Lease sign posted 3=Existing vacancies a=1-3 vacancies b=4-6 vacancies c=7 or more vacancies 4=Deferred maintenance Appendix D-3 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin Specific Plan-Villa a Parkway District Assessor Description of Parcel Address Acres Building Year Age of', FAR FAR Units Parcel Number Sq Ft Built Structure (existing) (DDSP) 941-0175-021-05 Yu-Yu 7465 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD 0.25 1,280 1968 45 0.12 0.5 4 941-0175-021-06 Valley Center,por. 7435 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD 0.55 6,320 1966 47 0.26 0.5 8 941-0175-021-08 Valley Center,por. 7381 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD 0.57 7,720 1966 47 0.31 0.5 9 941-0175-021-07 Dentist 7252 VILLAGE PKWY STE B 0.12 1,581 1966 47 0.29 0.5 2 941-0197-079-05 Fitness 2000,por. 7479 VILLAGE PKWY 0.49 4,750 0.22 0.5 7 941-0197-079-06 Fitness 2000,por. 7447 VILLAGE PKWY 0.06 2,400 0.99 0.5 1 941-0197-079-07 Fitness 2000,por. 7395 VILLAGE PKWY 0.12 5,000 1970 43 0.99 0.5 2 941-0197-079-08 Fitness 2000,por. 7373 VILLAGE PKWY 0.60 23,200 1970 43 0.89 0.5 9 941-0197-079-09 Fitness 2000,por. 7311 VILLAGE PKWY 0.14 6,750 1.09 0.5 2 941-0197-079-10 Fitness 2000,por. 7303 VILLAGE PKWY 0.28 12,285 1.00 0.5 4 941-0197-079-11 Fitness 2000,por. 7293 VILLAGE PKWY 0.08 3,600 1.00 0.5 1 941-0197-079-12 Copper Skillet 7281 VILLAGE PKWY 0.47 2,520 1977 36 0.12 0.5 7 941-0197-079-14 Fitness 2000 Parking Lot 7293 VILLAGE PKWY 3.93 523 1976 37 0.00 0.5 59 941-0210-001-05 7410 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD 0.81 1 6,258 1968 45 0.18 0.5 12 941-0210-001-04 Vacant 7400 AMADOR VALLEY BLVD 0.26 0.00 0.5 4 941-0210-002-02 Parkway Center,por. 7150 VILLAGE PKWY 0.99 6,379 1968 45 0.15 0.5 15 941-0210-005-04 Parkway Center,por. 7114 VILLAGE PKWY 2.01 13,021 1968 45 0.15 0.5 30 941-0210-005-05 Parkway Center,por. 7080 VILLAGE PKWY 0.73 12,750 0.40 0.5 11 941-0210-005-03 Parkway Center,por. 7032 VILLAGE PKWY 0.56 0.00 0.5 8 941-0210-006-00 7000 VILLAGE PKWY 1.10 7,076 1975 38 0.15 0.5 17 941-0210-007-01 Office Building 6966 VILLAGE PKWY 0.93 9,600 1971 42 0.24 0.5 14 941-0210-008-00 6900 VILLAGE PKWY 1.10 12,456 0.26 0.5 17 941-0210-009-00 6894 VILLAGE PKWY 1.10 23,770 0.50 0.5 17 941-0210-010-01 6842 VILLAGE PKWY 0.56 8,685 1975 38 0.35 0.5 8 941-0210-010-02 6830 VILLAGE PKWY 0.35 1,498 1971 42 0.10 0.5 5 941-1401-019-00 Dublin Auto Wash 7240 VILLAGE PKWY 0.62 2,347 1974 39 0.09 0.5 9 Appendix D-4 City of Dublin Housing Element(2015-2023) Downtown Dublin S ' ,&Plan-Villa a Parkwa`District Assessor Building. Year Age of FAR FAR Descnptiort Of Panel Address "Acres Aces Uhas .Parcel Mumber BvEft= Strycture (esbr�gl (ObSP) 941-1401-021-01 Shangrila 6558 VILLAGE PKWY 1.07 3,824 1978 35 0.08 0.5 16 941-0210-030-00 Hostess 6841 VILLAGE PKWY 0.71 6,200 0.20 0.5 11 941-0210-029-00 Parkway Vet 6851 VILLAGE PKWY 0.37 2,215 1971 42 0.14 0.5 6 941-0210-019-00 6891 VILLAGE PKWY 1.00 15,701 1970 43 0.36 0.5 15 941-0210-018-00 Post Office 6937 VILLAGE PKWY 1.00 5,712 1969 44 0.13 0.5 15 941-0210-032-00 Speedee 6955 VILLAGE PKWY 0.46 5,031 0.25 0.5 7 941-0210-031-00 Corwood 6973 VILLAGE PKWY 0.53 2,800 0.12 0.5 8 941-0210-016-02 7033 VILLAGE PKWY 1.02 21,298 1972 41 0.48 0.5 15 941-0210-015-00 Village Green 7065 VILLAGE PKWY 1.05 12,260 0.27 0.5 16 941-0210-014-00 Vacant/Rahma Market&Taco Bell 7111 VILLAGE PKWY 1.05 6,059 1975 38 0.13 0.5 16 Total 27.07 407 Appendix D-5 RESOLUTION NO. 14-XX A RESOLUTION OF THE PLANNING COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN RECOMMENDING THAT THE CITY COUNCIL DIRECT STAFF TO SUBMIT THE DRAFT 2015-2023 HOUSING ELEMENT TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOR REVIEW CITY-WIDE PLPA-2013-00031 WHEREAS, the State of California requires that Cities and Counties adopt a comprehensive, long-term General Plan for the physical development of the City; and WHEREAS, the Housing Element is one of seven mandated elements of the General Plan and must address the existing and projected housing needs for all economic segments of the community; and WHEREAS, the State law currently requires that Housing Elements be updated and certified by January 31, 2015; and WHEREAS, the City of Dublin has contracted with Veronica Tam & Associates to assist Staff in preparing the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element includes Goals and Policies that will accomplish the following: o Ensure that a broad range of housing types are provided to meet the needs of existing and future residents; o Encourage and facilitate the development of lower and moderate income housing; o Maintain and enhance the quality of residential neighborhoods in Dublin; • Promote equal opportunity for all residents to reside in housing of their choice; and, • Increase energy efficiency and conservation in residential developments. And; WHEREAS, the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element also includes specific Housing Programs that will implement the Goals and Policies outlined above; and WHEREAS, the Housing Programs are grouped into the following six categories: 1. Conservation of the Existing Supply of Housing; 2. Production of Housing; 3. Provision of Adequate Housing Sites; 4. Removal of Governmental Constraints; 5. Promotion of Equal Housing Opportunity; and 6. Green Building Programs. ATTACHMENT 2 WHEREAS, on February 25, 2014 a public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to provide an overview of the Housing Element update process including the statutory requirements of what the Housing Element must address; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2014 a second public meeting was held with the Planning Commission to review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), together with State Guidelines and City Environmental Regulations require that certain projects be reviewed for environmental impacts and that environmental documents be prepared; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the CEQA, the project is found to be Categorically Exempt under Section 15306, Class 6 (Information Collection) of the State of California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines; and WHEREAS, a Staff Report was submitted recommending that the Planning Commission review the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element and adopt a Resolution recommending that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review; and, WHEREAS, the Planning Commission did hear and consider all said reports, recommendations and testimony herein above set forth and used its independent judgment to evaluate the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the foregoing recitals are true and correct and made a part of this Resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Dublin Planning Commission does hereby recommend that the City Council direct Staff to submit the draft 2015-2023 Housing Element to the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development for review. PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 13th day of May 2014 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: ATTEST: Planning Commission Chair Assistant Community Development Director 2 of 2